Effect of Mangrove Ecosystems on Coastal Ecology and Climate Change

A special issue of Forests (ISSN 1999-4907). This special issue belongs to the section "Forest Hydrology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2024 | Viewed by 723

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
School of Life Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200438, China
Interests: blue carbon; coastal ecosystem protection; remote sensing monitoring; climate change; ecological modeling
Department of Marine Science, Ocean College, Zhejiang University, Zhoushan 316000, China
Interests: spatiotemporal data analysis; remote sensing; spatiotemporal geostatistics; artificial intelligence; blue carbon
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Department of Geography, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong 999077, China
Interests: sustainable ocean/coastal development; marine ecology; spatiotemporal modeling; environmental pollution; risk assessment
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Mangrove forests are highly productive and biologically significant ecosystems that provide a wide range of goods and services to society. Compared with other ecosystems, mangrove ecosystems have a much higher capacity for carbon sequestration and storage. Climate change, primarily driven by human activities, is occurring globally and poses significant threats to both humans and natural ecosystems. The carbon captured by mangrove ecosystems can help mitigate anthropocentric CO2 emissions, making them crucial in addressing climate change and achieving sustainable development goals (SDGs). However, widespread deforestation and degradation have severely impacted mangroves. Since the 1980s, around 50% of the world’s mangrove forests have been lost, putting them at great risk.  Therefore, urgent action is needed to protect and restore mangroves globally. This Special Issue aims to explore the impacts of mangrove ecosystems on coastal ecology and climate change, providing scientific support for conservation efforts and the future development of coastal areas.

Potential topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Monitoring of mangrove ecosystems;
  • Ecological values associated with mangrove ecosystems;
  • Conservation strategies for mangrove ecosystems;
  • Assessing the role of mangroves in blue carbon;
  • Understanding the significance of mangroves in coastal zones;
  • Examining the contribution of mangroves to climate change;
  • Future management for coastal ecosystems.

Dr. Yuhan Zheng
Dr. Junyu He
Dr. Qutu Jiang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • mangrove conservation
  • ecological value
  • blue carbon
  • remote sensing
  • sustainable development
  • spatiotemporal modeling

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

16 pages, 3971 KiB  
Article
Population Status of the Endangered Semi-Mangrove Dolichandrone spathacea on Hainan Island, China
by Mi Tian, Xinran Ke, Ming Li, Kaixuan Deng, Yong Yang, Zanshan Fang, Cairong Zhong, Shen Li, Zhengjie Zhu, Nora Fung-Yee Tam, Tao Lang and Haichao Zhou
Forests 2024, 15(5), 865; https://doi.org/10.3390/f15050865 - 15 May 2024
Viewed by 353
Abstract
In China, Dolichandrone spathacea is a rare and endangered semi-mangrove plant species with an extremely small population, naturally distributed only in Zhanjiang City and the east coast of Hainan Island. Despite conservation concerns, the population status of D. spathacea has received little scientific attention. In [...] Read more.
In China, Dolichandrone spathacea is a rare and endangered semi-mangrove plant species with an extremely small population, naturally distributed only in Zhanjiang City and the east coast of Hainan Island. Despite conservation concerns, the population status of D. spathacea has received little scientific attention. In this study, we evaluated the current status of D. spathacea on Hainan Island, China, in order to propose sustainable conservation strategies for future ecological restoration of its natural population. D. spathacea on Hainan Island can be divided into four populations. All the D. spathacea populations present a state of overall dispersion, local concentration, and occasionally sporadic existence, and they exist in geographical isolation. The young, middle, and old D. spathacea plants account for 20.42%, 66.20%, and 13.38%, respectively, indicating that the D. spathacea population on Hainan Island is declining. Furthermore, instead of temporal structure, we used diameter at breast height (DBH) to establish a static life table, draw a population survival curve, and quantify the future development trend through population dynamic analysis and time-series prediction. These results suggest that the D. spathacea population in the Bamen Gulf (Wenchang) and Qingmei Harbor (Sanya) on Hainan Island is sensitive to external disturbances and possesses two main increases in mortality rate—namely, in its juvenile and mature stages—due to competition and anthropogenic interferences, which might be the most important reasons for its endangered status. Depending on the current conditions of the D. spathacea population, we should conserve and expand mature trees in situ, preserve their germplasm resources, rehabilitate their habitats to promote provenance restoration, and conduct artificial cultivation and spreading planting in order to realize the sustainable conservation and management of D. spathacea. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effect of Mangrove Ecosystems on Coastal Ecology and Climate Change)
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