Wood as Cultural Heritage Material—Volume II

A special issue of Forests (ISSN 1999-4907). This special issue belongs to the section "Wood Science and Forest Products".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 14 December 2024 | Viewed by 600

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
National Research Council of Italy, Institute of BioEconomy (CNR-IBE), Sesto Fiorentino, Italy
Interests: wood science; archaeology; heritage conservation
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
National Research Council of Italy, Institute of BioEconomy (CNR-IBE), Sesto Fiorentino, Italy
Interests: wood aging; archaeological wood; waterlogged archaeological wood; wooden/table paintings; wooden statues; historic timber structures; historic wood dating
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of Agriculture, Food, Environment and Forestry (DAGRI), University of Florence, Via San Bonaventura 13, 50145 Florence, Italy
Interests: hygro-mechanical behavior of wood and wooden artefacts; physical and mechanical characterization of wood

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Guest Editor
Department of Agriculture, Food, Environment and Forestry (DAGRI), University of Florence, Via San Bonaventura 13, 50145 Florence, Italy
Interests: wood science application to cultural heritage conservation; hygro-mechanical behavior of wood and wooden artefacts; numerical analysis of wooden cultural heritage and timber structures

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Guest Editor
China Academy of Cultural Heritage, Beijing 100029, China
Interests: conservation; cultural heritage; wood object; waterlogged wood; archaeological wood; polymer

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

For thousands of years, humans have used wood as a raw material. We now consider as cultural heritage wooden-made constructions, structures, tools, and other artefacts. The preservation of such objects is of great importance today because they show the skills and knowledge of our past generations, together with their aesthetics. Several are the categories of wooden cultural heritage to be preserved, from buildings to painted panels, musical instruments, statues, furniture, buildings, boats, and archaeological wood, among others. The conservation of these objects is a complex task because of the biodegradable nature of wood and the various as well as different materials used to build them. In some cases, such as, for instance, musical instruments or buildings, preservation also involves the unique aspect of keeping their functionality. Additionally, the advancements in numerical modeling and finite element analysis have become feasible and effective tools in the structural analysis of wooden artifacts. Another crucial aspect of preserving wooden cultural heritage is the dating of wood, which provides useful information to conservators and restorers with which to better analyze objects.

Dr. Nicola Macchioni
Dr. Elisa Pecoraro
Dr. Paola Mazzanti
Dr. Lorenzo Riparbelli
Dr. Dawa Shen
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • wood aging
  • archaeological wood
  • waterlogged archaeological wood
  • painted panels
  • wooden statues
  • historical music instruments
  • historic furniture
  • historic timber structures
  • historic wood dating
  • historic wood numerical modeling
  • historic wood simulation

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

41 pages, 80924 KiB  
Review
The Pivotal Role of Microscopy in Unravelling the Nature of Microbial Deterioration of Waterlogged Wood: A Review
by Adya P. Singh, Jong Sik Kim, Ralf Möller, Ramesh R. Chavan and Yoon Soo Kim
Forests 2024, 15(5), 889; https://doi.org/10.3390/f15050889 - 20 May 2024
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Abstract
This review focuses on the pivotal role microscopy has played in diagnosing the type(s) of microbial attacks present in waterlogged ancient wooden objects, and to understand the nature and extent of deterioration of such objects. The microscopic journey began with the application of [...] Read more.
This review focuses on the pivotal role microscopy has played in diagnosing the type(s) of microbial attacks present in waterlogged ancient wooden objects, and to understand the nature and extent of deterioration of such objects. The microscopic journey began with the application of light microscopy (LM) to examine the deterioration of waterlogged woods, notably foundation piles supporting historic buildings, progressing into the use of high-resolution imaging tools (SEM and TEM) and techniques. Although bacteria were implicated in the deterioration of foundation piles, confirmation that bacteria can indeed degrade wood in its native state came when decaying wood from natural environments was examined using electron microscopy, particularly TEM, which enabled bacterial association with cell wall regions undergoing degradation to be clearly resolved. The information base has been a catalyst, stimulating numerous studies in the past three decades or so to understand the nature of microbial degradation of waterlogged archaeological wood more precisely, combining LM, SEM, and TEM with high-resolution chemical analytical methods, including chemical microscopy. The emerging information is aiding targeted developments towards a more effective conservation of ancient wooden objects as they begin to be uncovered from burial and waterlogging environments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wood as Cultural Heritage Material—Volume II)
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