Effects of Collective Trauma in the Modern Society

A special issue of European Journal of Investigation in Health, Psychology and Education (ISSN 2254-9625).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2024 | Viewed by 1321

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Assistant Professor, Faculty of Croatian Studies, University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia
Interests: clinical psychology and neuroscience; cognitive psychology; biopsychology; neuropsychology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Associate Professor in Clinical Psychology, Faculty of Croatian Studies, University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia
Interests: psychology; public health; clinical psychology; biopsychology; palliative psychology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In an era of uncertainty, it is expected to experience changes in everyday functioning. Crises, such as war, natural disasters, or other catastrophes that are out of our control and influence, can easily form collective traumatic experiences. Collective trauma refers to the effect of a traumatic experience that impacts and involves entire communities, societies, or groups of people. Since collective traumas can be passed down to future generations and form transgenerational trauma, it is important to detect these experiences and implement appropriate tools necessary for rehabilitation, post-traumatic growth, and resilience.

This Special Issue calls for the submission of manuscripts related to the effects of various collective traumas on everyday functioning in the modern world and appropriate coping skills needed to reduce the impact of symptoms in the aftermath of a traumatic experience.

Dr. Vanja Kopilaš
Dr. Lovorka Brajković
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. European Journal of Investigation in Health, Psychology and Education is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • trauma
  • resilience
  • PTSD
  • post-traumatic growth
  • coping skills

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

17 pages, 925 KiB  
Article
Psychological Distress and Behavioral Vigilance in Response to Minority Stress and Threat among Members of the Asian American and Pacific Islander Community during the COVID-19 Pandemic
by Andrew S. Franks, Rin Nguyen, Y. Jenny Xiao and Dena M. Abbott
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2024, 14(3), 488-504; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe14030033 - 26 Feb 2024
Viewed by 869
Abstract
Stigmatization, hostility, and violence towards the Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) community have increased sharply during the COVID-19 pandemic. It is important to conduct research to promote understanding of the effects of such stigmatization on the AAPI community. Accordingly, the present study [...] Read more.
Stigmatization, hostility, and violence towards the Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) community have increased sharply during the COVID-19 pandemic. It is important to conduct research to promote understanding of the effects of such stigmatization on the AAPI community. Accordingly, the present study used a combined minority stress and integrated threat framework to examine whether factors related to AAPI identity would moderate the relationship between stigmatization/threat associated with AAPI identity and increased psychological distress and behavioral vigilance. AAPI individuals were recruited online from both Turk Prime and Reddit and completed measures of perceived stigmatization; integrated threat; depression, anxiety, and stress; and behavioral vigilance. Perceptions of stigmatization and threat predicted relevant outcomes both as individual predictors and in multivariate analyses. However, factors relating to the strength of AAPI identification did not moderate the effects of stigmatization and threat on psychological distress and behavioral vigilance, which is a result that failed to support this aspect of the broader conceptual model on which this project was based. Instead, these proposed moderators were themselves predicted by stigmatization and threat variables. The implications of these findings for effective interventions to alleviate the negative consequences of anti-Asian stigmatization are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effects of Collective Trauma in the Modern Society)
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