Interventions Impacting the Natural History of Chronic Plaque Psoriasis

A special issue of Dermato (ISSN 2673-6179).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2024 | Viewed by 931

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Medicine, University of Verona, Verona, Italy
Interests: psoriasis; clinical dermatology; atopic eczema/dermatitis; venereology

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Guest Editor
Associate Professor, Section of Dermatology and Venereology, Department of Medicine, University of Verona, Verona, Italy
Interests: psoriasis; psoriatic arthritis; atopic dermatitis; metabolic syndrome; vitamin D; alopecia areata; autoimmune bullous diseases; hidradenitis suppurativa; biologic therapy; urticaria
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Chronic plaque psoriasis is not only a cutaneous disease, but a systemic disorder. There is a growing body of epidemiological evidence supporting the associations between psoriasis and cardiometabolic, gastrointestinal, renal, malignancies and mood disorders. The pathogenesis of the intersection of psoriasis and comorbidities is not fully understood. Psoriatic skin produces a broad range of inflammatory cytokines that are released into the systemic circulation and fuel systemic inflammation. Other non-cutaneous sites, including adipose tissue, may contribute to this inflammatory state. Elevated systemic levels of cytokines support asymptomatic inflammation that can cause tissue damage over time. In addition, the natural clinical course of psoriasis has been poorly characterized. The risk of progression from mild to moderate–severe psoriasis is unclear. Identifying prognostic factors that negatively affect the clinical course of psoriasis may provide an important advantage, enabling early therapeutic intervention of patients at risk of worsening disease.

Drawing on experience with other immune-mediated diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and Crohn's disease, it has been hypothesized that timely systemic treatment targeting pathogenic cytokines may not only improve skin symptoms but also systemic inflammation. The objective of the Special issue is to collect evidence the impact of interventions on the natural history of plaque psoriasis.

Experimental and observational studies, systematic reviews and meta-analyses and narrative reviews are welcome.

Dr. Francesco Bellinato
Dr. Paolo Gisondi
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • psoriasis
  • biologics
  • disease course
  • systemic inflammation
  • comorbidities

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

12 pages, 1045 KiB  
Article
Eosinophil-Count-Derived Inflammatory Markers and Psoriasis Severity: Exploring the Link
by Oana Mirela Tiucă, Silviu Horia Morariu, Claudia Raluca Mariean, Robert Aurelian Tiucă, Alin Codrut Nicolescu and Ovidiu Simion Cotoi
Dermato 2024, 4(2), 25-36; https://doi.org/10.3390/dermato4020004 - 15 Apr 2024
Viewed by 467
Abstract
Psoriasis is an immune-mediated disease, with various triggering factors, genetic predisposition, and an altered immune response concurring in the development of this disease. The eosinophil is a cell with an important role in various kinds of inflammatory processes. Scarce data are available regarding [...] Read more.
Psoriasis is an immune-mediated disease, with various triggering factors, genetic predisposition, and an altered immune response concurring in the development of this disease. The eosinophil is a cell with an important role in various kinds of inflammatory processes. Scarce data are available regarding the role of the eosinophil in psoriasis. This study aims to address the overall relationship between eosinophil-count-derived inflammatory markers and psoriasis severity. There were 366 patients fulfilling the inclusion criteria included in this retrospective study and they were divided based on the body surface area (BSA) scale in mild and moderate-to-severe psoriasis. White blood cell (WBC), neutrophil, lymphocyte, monocyte, and eosinophil count, along with eosinophil-to-monocyte ratio (EMR) and eosinophil-to-neutrophil ratio (ENR) differed significantly between the two study groups. Eosinophil count, EMR, and ENR negatively correlated with disease severity. ENR is the most reliable eosinophil-count-derived marker in assessing psoriasis severity with an AUC of 0.627 and a cut-off value of 0.03. Eosinophil-count-derived inflammatory markers’ usefulness in appreciating disease severity was assessed for the first time in the literature in this study and proved to be reliable for the eosinophil count, EMR, and ENR. Full article
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