Periodontal and Peri-Implant Diseases: Etiopathogenesis and Management

A special issue of Dentistry Journal (ISSN 2304-6767).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2022) | Viewed by 14427

Special Issue Editor

School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Rochester Medical Center, 601 Elmwood Ave, Box 683, Rochester, NY 14642, USA
Interests: periodontology; implant dentistry; oral-systemic interactions
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear authors,

It is my sincere pleasure to invite you to submit your valuable manuscript to the forthcoming Special Issue, “Periodontal and Peri-Implant Diseases: Etiopathogenesis and Management” in the journal Dentistry . It is well known that the accumulation of bacterial biofilm is primarily associated with the etiopathogenesis of periodontal- (periodontitis) and peri-implant diseases (peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis). Poor routine oral hygiene maintenance is the most common risk-factor of periodontal and peri-implant diseases; however, habits such as tobacco smoking, use of electronic nicotine delivery systems, and chewing smokeless tobacco products have been linked with the etiopathogenesis of periodontal and peri-implant diseases. From a systemic perspective, diseases such as acquired immune deficiency syndrome, poorly controlled diabetes mellitus, and cardiovascular diseases may contribute towards the development and/or progression of periodontal and peri-implant diseases. 

Conventionally, the mechanical curettage of supra- and sub-gingival teeth (or scaling and root planing (SRP)) and implant surfaces is performed for the management of peri-implant diseases. However, adjunct therapies such as antibiotic and probiotic therapy, photobiomodulation, and photodynamic therapy have been reported to augment the overall anti-inflammatory effect of SRP and mechanical debridement which are traditionally performed for the management of periodontal and peri-implant diseases, respectively. Irrespectively of the type of therapeutic regimens adopted for the management of periodontal and peri-implant diseases, patient education with particular emphasis on routine oral hygiene maintenance, routine visits to oral healthcare providers and the beneficial effects of systemic health status should not be overlooked.

Potential original and review articles that may be considered to undergo peer-review in this Special Issue include but are not limited to those related to the following topics:

  1. Contribution of proinflammatory cytokines towards the etiopathogenesis of periodontal and peri-implant diseases;
  2. Role of anti-inflammatory proteins towards the progression of periodontal and peri-implant diseases;
  3. Role of herbal medications in the management of periodontal and peri-implant diseases;
  4. Role of essential oil-based formulations in the management of periodontal and peri-implant diseases;
  5. Alveolar bone grafting around periodontal and peri-implant defects;
  6. Role of viruses and fungi in the etiopathogenesis of periodontal and peri-implant diseases;
  7. Growth factors in periodontology and implant dentistry;
  8. Impact of patient education in relation to the long-term success of periodontal and peri-implant treatments.

The editorial board welcomes authors to submit their research proposals (basic science and clinical) and will be pleased to consider the proposed topics after discussion with the other board members.

The editorial board is looking forward to receiving your valuable research work. 

Prof. Dr. Fawad Javed
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Dentistry Journal is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • periodontitis
  • peri-implant diseases
  • etiopathogenesis
  • treatment

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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10 pages, 933 KiB  
Article
Adjunctive Effect of Green Tea Mouthwash Prepared at Different Steeping Temperatures on Gingivitis: A Triple-Blind Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial
Dent. J. 2021, 9(12), 139; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj9120139 - 30 Nov 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2540
Abstract
Purpose: To compare the effect of green tea mouthwashes prepared at different steeping temperatures as adjuncts to mechanical plaque control on gingivitis. Methods: Forty-five women with gingivitis participated in this 4-week randomized controlled clinical trial. They received professional mechanical plaque control and rinsed [...] Read more.
Purpose: To compare the effect of green tea mouthwashes prepared at different steeping temperatures as adjuncts to mechanical plaque control on gingivitis. Methods: Forty-five women with gingivitis participated in this 4-week randomized controlled clinical trial. They received professional mechanical plaque control and rinsed daily with either warm green tea, hot–cold green tea or placebo. Dental plaque control record (PCR) and gingival bleeding indices (GBI) were recorded at baseline and 7, 14 and 28 days after. Results: Participants’ mean age was 20.7 ± 2 years. The mean scores for the PCR and GBI at baseline were 82.4 ± 19 and 85.8 ± 7, respectively. All groups showed significant reduction in PCR and GBI between Days 0 and 28 (p < 0.01). No significant differences in PCR were observed between the groups at any of the examinations (p > 0.01). The warm green tea group demonstrated significantly lower GBI at all examinations compared to the hot–cold group (p < 0.01). Conclusions: Within study limits, green tea-made mouthwashes significantly reduced plaque and gingivitis when used as adjuncts to mechanical plaque control. The green tea mouthwash prepared in warm water demonstrated significantly higher efficacy in lowering gingivitis compared to that prepared in hot water followed by ice. Full article
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Review

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15 pages, 432 KiB  
Review
Periodontal and Peri-Implant Diseases and Systemically Administered Statins: A Systematic Review
Dent. J. 2021, 9(9), 100; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj9090100 - 04 Sep 2021
Cited by 31 | Viewed by 3529
Abstract
Hyperlipidemia is a well-recognized risk factor for cardiovascular disease, which, in turn, acts as a contributory factor in periodontitis development. Periodontitis has been associated with benign tumors and cancers and withseveral disorders, including hyperlipidemia. Correspondingly, periodontal treatment may exert a positive effect on [...] Read more.
Hyperlipidemia is a well-recognized risk factor for cardiovascular disease, which, in turn, acts as a contributory factor in periodontitis development. Periodontitis has been associated with benign tumors and cancers and withseveral disorders, including hyperlipidemia. Correspondingly, periodontal treatment may exert a positive effect on lipid metabolism, although opposite evidence has also been reported. As a counterpart, the therapy for hyperlipidemia, conventionally based on statins, has been proposed to positively affect periodontal conditions, mainly due to statin pleiotropic effects, reducing periodontal inflammation and promoting osseointegration. Therefore, the present systematic review aimed to evaluate, in subjects with untreated periodontitis and peri-implant disease (Population), the effect of routine systemically administered statins (Intervention), compared to non-statin use (Comparison), on periodontal parameters around natural teeth and implants (Outcome). Discordant results were found in periodontal parameters, and the current lack of such data related to peri-implant tissues and to alveolar bone loss highlights the need for further studies on the topic, potentially paving the way for a more comprehensive approach to periodontitis and peri-implantitis management. Indeed, the validation of the beneficial effect provided by systemically delivered statins on periodontal and peri-implant tissues may direct recall scheduling, predict response to therapy and, therefore, guide treatment strategies of periodontal and peri-implant treatments in statin users. Full article
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8 pages, 556 KiB  
Review
Association between Periodontitis and Genetic Polymorphisms in Interleukins among Patients with Diabetes Mellitus
Dent. J. 2021, 9(4), 45; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj9040045 - 18 Apr 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2300
Abstract
There is a perplexity in the association between interleukin (IL) polymorphisms and periodontitis among patients with and without diabetes mellitus (DM). The aim of the present study was to evaluate indexed data regarding the association between periodontitis and genetic polymorphisms in interleukins among [...] Read more.
There is a perplexity in the association between interleukin (IL) polymorphisms and periodontitis among patients with and without diabetes mellitus (DM). The aim of the present study was to evaluate indexed data regarding the association between periodontitis and genetic polymorphisms in interleukins among patients with and without DM. The addressed question was “Is there an association between periodontitis and polymorphisms in interleukins among patients with and without DM?” Original studies were included. Indexed databases were searched, and the pattern of the present literature review was customized to summaries’ the pertinent information. Eight studies were included and processed for data extraction. Two studies showed that polymorphisms in IL-1B genes aggravate periodontitis in patients with type-2 DM, and two studies showed that IL-1B genes either do not or are less likely to contribute towards the progression of periodontitis in patients with type-2 DM. Two studies reported that IL genes do not show cross-susceptibility with periodontitis and type-2 DM. One study reported that the primary factor that governs the occurrence and progression of periodontitis in patients with and without type-2 DM is poor routine oral hygiene maintenance. Seven studies had a high risk of bias. The role of IL gene polymorphisms in the development and progression of periodontitis in patients with and without DM remains controversial. Full article
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Other

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12 pages, 836 KiB  
Systematic Review
Does Ultraviolet Radiation Exhibit Antimicrobial Effect against Oral Pathogens Attached on Various Dental Implant Surfaces? A Systematic Review
Dent. J. 2022, 10(6), 93; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj10060093 - 31 May 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2057
Abstract
Background: Dental implant therapy is currently identified as the most effective treatment for edentulous patient. However, peri-implant inflammations were found to be one of the most common complications that leads to the loss and failure of dental implantation. Ultraviolet (UV) radiation has [...] Read more.
Background: Dental implant therapy is currently identified as the most effective treatment for edentulous patient. However, peri-implant inflammations were found to be one of the most common complications that leads to the loss and failure of dental implantation. Ultraviolet (UV) radiation has been proposed to enhance bone integration and reduce bacterial attachment. In this study, we aimed to systematically review the current evidence regarding the antimicrobial effect of UV on different dental implant surfaces. Methods: Five databases including PubMed, Scopus, Web of science, VHL, and Cochran Library were searched to retrieve relevant articles. All original reports that examined the effect of the application of UV radiation on dental implants were included in our study. Results: A total of 16 in vitro studies were included in this systematic review. Polymethyl methacrylate UV radiation has induced a significant decrease in bacterial survival in PMMA materials, with an increased effect by modification with 2.5% and 5% TiO2 nanotubes. UV-C showed a superior effect to UV-A in reducing bacterial attachment and accumulation. UV wavelength of 265 and 285 nm showed powerful bactericidal effects. UV of 365 nm for 24 h had the highest inhibition of bacterial growth in ZnO coated magnesium alloys. In UV-irradiated commercially pure titanium surfaces treated with plasma electrolytic oxidation, silver ion application, heat or alkali had shown significant higher bactericidal effect vs non-irradiated treated surfaces than the treatment with any of them alone. UVC and gamma-ray irradiation increased the hydrophilicity of zirconia surface, compared to the dry heat. Conclusion: UV radiation on Ti surfaces exhibited significant antibacterial effects demonstrated through the reduction in bacterial attachment and biofilm formation with suppression of bacterial cells growth. Combination of UV and treated surfaces with alkali, plasma electrolytic oxidation, silver ion application or heat enhance the overall photocatalytic antimicrobial effect. Full article
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23 pages, 2159 KiB  
Systematic Review
Success Rates and Complications Associated with Single Immediate Implants: A Systematic Review
Dent. J. 2022, 10(2), 31; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj10020031 - 21 Feb 2022
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2993
Abstract
This study examined the success rates of single immediate implants and their associated biological, hardware and aesthetic complications. Using a developed search strategy, randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on single-unit immediate implants with at least six human participants, a minimum follow-up time of 12 [...] Read more.
This study examined the success rates of single immediate implants and their associated biological, hardware and aesthetic complications. Using a developed search strategy, randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on single-unit immediate implants with at least six human participants, a minimum follow-up time of 12 months and published between January 1999 and January 2021 were identified. Data was extracted independently using pre-designed data extraction forms. Information on success rates and associated biological, hardware and aesthetic complications were obtained and assessed. Out of 191 potentially eligible studies, 26 RCTs assessing 1270 patients with a total of 1326 single implants were included and further evaluated. In this review, success rate was reported to be 96.7–100% over a total of 9 studies. However, there was a lack of consensus on a universal success criterion between authors emphasizing the need for agreement. The average follow up was 29 months and most reported complications were aesthetic (63 cases, 4.7%), whilst there were relatively fewer biological, (20 cases, 1.5%), and hardware complications (24 cases, 1.8%). Success rate is an uncommon clinical outcome with 9 out of 26 of the selected RCTs reporting it. In these studies, single immediate implants showed a high success rate with low numbers of biological and hardware complications, and high patient satisfaction with aesthetics were reported in the short-term follow-up of one year. Full article
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