A Commemorative Issue of the Work of Prof. Dr. Ruth Freeman

A special issue of Dentistry Journal (ISSN 2304-6767).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2024 | Viewed by 5987

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Health Psychology, School of Medicine, University of St. Andrews, St. Andrews, UK
Interests: assessment of dental anxiety; psychometrics; frequent psychological evaluation; sequential analysis; patient-centred care; health care communication; emotional expression; clinical responsiveness
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Guest Editor
Department of Community Dentistry, University of Turku, 20014 Turku, Finland
Interests: dental fear and anxiety; oral health-related quality of life; oral health promotion

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Guest Editor
Unit of Oral Health, Dentistry and Society, School of Clinical Dentistry, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK
Interests: sociology of the mouth; interaction of clinical staff and patients; quality of life

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Guest Editor
Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, UK
Interests: dental public health; community dentistry; inclusion oral health

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Guest Editor
Dundee Dental Hospital and School, University of Dundee, Park Place, Dundee DD1 4HN, UK
Interests: paediatric dentistry; RCTs; evidence-based medicine; intervention design and testing

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

At the untimely death of Professor Ruth Freeman on the 23rd September 2021, the internationally known dental public health specialist and academic had just entered her retirement from full-time work with the University of Dundee. Although the status of her retirement might have indicated a stepping back, she had many projects still being prosecuted indicating a continued active legacy. Her interests were extensive, and arguably a unique combination of both a psychological and physical focus.  She spear-headed the excluded individual, the status of their health— oral or general— and how services, health behaviour and environment could be altered systematically to improve their quality of life. The Dentistry Journal wishes to honour this remarkable scholar by supporting a Special Issue dedicated to her work. The Issue offers authors the opportunity to submit articles that acknowledge Ruth Freeman’s work (single perspective or across various fields). Authors might include reference to the many specific areas that her research touched and influenced. They include, but not exclusively, minority groups: the homeless, prisoners, dental phobics, chronic facial pain sufferers, young dental patient attendees, disability and burn out of dental staff.  In addition, she was interested in the psychological makeup of the individual from an in-depth perspective.  She drew on her undoubted skill as a trained and practising psychoanalytical psychotherapist.  This in-depth work revealed underlying features. These, she believed, needed to be translated into active study, channelled into theory, and targeted as possible factors to introduce into effective intervention in service development or individual behaviour change. There are many examples in her research to demonstrate this process.  Articles are invited, therefore, that adopt an area of Ruth Freeman’s published work and indicate how her particular interest has influenced the authorship and preferably how their current research is reflecting and extending some of the tenets of her public health philosophy.

The Editor of the Special Issue is Professor Emeritus Gerry Humphris (Ruth’s spouse and oral health researcher) from the University of St Andrews.

In her final years, she wrote a series of policy papers with other key academics to advance the principles of intersectionality, inclusion oral health and vulnerability. Dr Janine Doughty is one member of the writing group (also including Muirhead and MacDonald) and is one of the Issue’s Sub-Editors. Additional Sub-Editors include Professor Satu Lahti from University of Turku, Finland and Professor Barry Gibson (University of Sheffield). Both are prestigious and influential researchers with an extensive collaborative history of working with Ruth Freeman in the fields of dental anxiety and qualitative methodology applied to oral health, respectively. Finally, Professor Jan Clarkson of the University of Dundee was Ruth Freeman’s Co-Director of the Dental Health Services Research Unit responsible for world-class oral health research. Prof Clarkson is probably best known for her ground-breaking trials of dental service development and interventions, and the two Co-Director academics together proved to present a formidable profile of expertise in the paediatric and public health arenas.

The Journal looks forward to receipt of original work to celebrate a sorely missed inspirational colleague and collaborator, a truly unique leader of a major set of branches of dental public health. The Special Issue will provide a marker of the substantial body of work that Freeman conducted and demonstrate her influence in years ahead.

Prof. Dr. Gerry M. Humphris
Prof. Dr. Satu Lahti
Prof. Dr. Barry Gibson
Dr. Janine Doughty
Prof. Dr. Jan Clarkson
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Dentistry Journal is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • dental public health
  • minority groups
  • health care communication
  • health education
  • staff support
  • burnout and occupational stress
  • dental fear

Published Papers (3 papers)

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13 pages, 1144 KiB  
Article
Two-Year Trajectories of Dental Anxiety in Parents and Their Association with Parents’ and Children’s Oral Healthcare Procedures in FinnBrain Birth Cohort Study
by Satu Lahti, Eeva-Leena Kataja, Auli Suominen, Katri Palo, Mika Ogawa, Anu Kallio, Outi Räikkönen, Vesa Pohjola, Kari Rantavuori, Linnea Karlsson and Hasse Karlsson
Dent. J. 2024, 12(3), 72; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj12030072 - 7 Mar 2024
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Abstract
We aimed to identify parents’ dental anxiety trajectories and the association of the trajectories with the number of parents’ and their children’s oral healthcare procedures in the FinnBrain Birth Cohort Study. Dental anxiety was measured with the Modified Dental Anxiety Scale at gestational [...] Read more.
We aimed to identify parents’ dental anxiety trajectories and the association of the trajectories with the number of parents’ and their children’s oral healthcare procedures in the FinnBrain Birth Cohort Study. Dental anxiety was measured with the Modified Dental Anxiety Scale at gestational weeks (gw) 14 and 34, as well as 3 and 24 months (mo) after childbirth. Oral healthcare procedures from gw14 to 24 mo were obtained from the national patient data register and categorized as preventive and treatment. Trajectories were identified with latent growth mixture modelling for 2068 fathers and 3201 mothers. Associations between trajectories and procedures adjusted for education were analyzed using unordered multinomial logit models. Fathers’ trajectories were stable low (80.1%), stable high (3.4%), stable moderate (11.0%), moderate increasing (3.9%) and high decreasing (1.6%). Mothers’ trajectories were stable low (80.7%), stable high (11.2%), moderate increasing (5.3%) and high decreasing (2.8%). Mothers with decreasing dental anxiety had a higher number of preventive and treatment procedures. Fathers with decreasing dental anxiety had a higher number of preventive and treatment procedures, while fathers with increasing dental anxiety had fewer procedures. Children of mothers with stable low dental anxiety had higher number of preventive procedures. There seems to be a two-way association between dental anxiety trajectories and oral healthcare procedures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue A Commemorative Issue of the Work of Prof. Dr. Ruth Freeman)
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Review

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19 pages, 904 KiB  
Review
A Scoping Review of the Oral Health Status, Oral Health Behaviours and Interventions to Improve the Oral Health of Children and Young People in Care and Care Leavers
by Joelle Booth, Jo Erwin, Lorna Burns, Nick Axford, Jane Horrell, Hannah Wheat, Robert Witton, Jill Shawe, Janine Doughty, Sarah Kaddour, Skye Boswell, Urshla Devalia, Abigail Nelder and Martha Paisi
Dent. J. 2024, 12(2), 38; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj12020038 - 9 Feb 2024
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Abstract
Background: Children and young people (CYP) in care experience poorer physical health and overall wellbeing in comparison to their peers. Despite this, relatively little is known about what their oral health needs and behaviours are. The aim of this scoping review was to [...] Read more.
Background: Children and young people (CYP) in care experience poorer physical health and overall wellbeing in comparison to their peers. Despite this, relatively little is known about what their oral health needs and behaviours are. The aim of this scoping review was to provide a global perspective on the oral health status and behaviours of CYP in care and care leavers. It also aimed to synthesise interventions that have been trialled in this population to improve oral health. Methods: Five databases were searched, Ovid Embase, Ovid MEDLINE, CINAHL (EBSCOhost), SocINDEX (EBSCOhost) and Dentistry and Oral Sciences Source (EBSCOhost), alongside grey literature sources up to January 2023. Eligibility criteria were studies that (i) reported on children and adolescents aged 25 years or younger who are currently in formal/informal foster or residential care and care leavers, (ii) pertained to oral health profile, behaviours or oral health promotion interventions (iii) and were published in the English language. Thematic analysis was used to develop the domains for oral health behaviours and interventions. Results: Seventy-one papers were included. Most papers were published from very high or medium Human Development Index countries. CYP in care were found to experience high levels of decay, dental trauma, periodontal disease and poorer oral health-related quality of life. Oral health behaviours included limited oral health self-care behaviours and a lack of oral health-based knowledge. The trialled interventions involved oral health education, supervised brushing and treatment or preventative dental care. Conclusions: This scoping review reveals that CYP in care experience poorer oral health in comparison to their peers. They are also less likely to carry out oral health self-care behaviours. This review highlights a scarcity of interventions to improve the oral health of this population and a paucity of evidence surrounding the oral health needs of care leavers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue A Commemorative Issue of the Work of Prof. Dr. Ruth Freeman)
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18 pages, 471 KiB  
Review
Access to Dental Care for Children and Young People in Care and Care Leavers: A Global Scoping Review
by Jo Erwin, Jane Horrell, Hannah Wheat, Nick Axford, Lorna Burns, Joelle Booth, Robert Witton, Jill Shawe, Janine Doughty, Sarah Kaddour, Skye Boswell, Urshla Devalia, Abigail Nelder and Martha Paisi
Dent. J. 2024, 12(2), 37; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj12020037 - 8 Feb 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1890
Abstract
Aims: This scoping review aimed to explore three research questions: 1. What is the dental care access for children and young people (CYP) in care and care leavers? 2. What factors influence CYP in care and care leavers’ access to dental care? 3. [...] Read more.
Aims: This scoping review aimed to explore three research questions: 1. What is the dental care access for children and young people (CYP) in care and care leavers? 2. What factors influence CYP in care and care leavers’ access to dental care? 3. What pathways have been developed to improve access to oral health care for CYP in care and care leavers? Methods: Five databases (Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid Embase, CINAHL, SocINDEX and Dentistry and Oral Sciences Source) and grey literature sources were systematically searched. Articles relating to CYP in care or care leavers aged 0–25 years old, published up to January 2023 were included. Abstracts, posters and publications not in the English language were excluded. The data relating to dental care access were analysed using thematic analysis. Results: The search identified 942 articles, of which 247 were excluded as duplicates. A review of the titles and abstracts yielded 149 studies. Thirty-eight were eligible for inclusion in the review: thirty-three peer-reviewed articles, one PhD thesis and four grey literature sources. All papers were published from very high or medium Human Development Index countries. The studies indicate that despite having higher treatment needs, CYP in care and care leavers experience greater difficulty in accessing dental services than those not care-experienced. Organisational, psycho-social and logistical factors influence their access to dental care. Their experience of dental care may be impacted by adverse childhood events. Pathways to dental care have been developed, but little is known of their impact on access. There are very few studies that include care leavers. The voices of care-experienced CYP are missing from dental access research. Conclusions: care-experienced CYP are disadvantaged in their access to dental care, and there are significant barriers to their treatment needs being met. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue A Commemorative Issue of the Work of Prof. Dr. Ruth Freeman)
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