Oral Health and Dysbiosis

A special issue of Dentistry Journal (ISSN 2304-6767).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2025 | Viewed by 1269

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Periodontics, School of Dentistry, Louisiana State University Health Science Centre, New Orleans, LA 70119, USA
Interests: oral microbiology; oral health; dentistry; periodontology; periodontal microbiology; periodontal systemic inter-relationship; diabetes

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Guest Editor
Department of Periodontics, School of Dentistry, Louisiana State University Health Science Centre, New Orleans, LA 70119, USA
Interests: periodontics; implant dentistry

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Guest Editor
School of Health Sciences, College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, The University of Newcastle, Ourimbah, NSW 2258, Australia
Interests: biomaterials; stem cells; tissue engineering; dental implants; periodontal disease; oral cancer
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Oral health is in a dynamic equilibrium maintained by complex interactions interplaying between the host and the oral microbiome, comprising approximately 700 species of various bacteria, fungi, protozoa, virus and archaea. The inter-species interaction and the immune response of the host can cause a shift in this equilibrium, resulting in a dysbiotic state, and trigger the onset of oral diseases.

The oral microbial interaction and dysbiosis can affect the host immune response through the activation of pro-inflammatory pathways via complex cascades involving cytokines, immune receptors, antibodies and cell-mediated immunity. The extent of the host response is infuenced by the host’s autoimmunity, genetic and environmental factors along with systemic diseases, such as diabetes, atherosclerosis, Alzheimer’s disease and malignancies of head and neck. This complex oral microbial interaction and dysbiosis is also known to affect host immune response via the activation and dysregulation of cytokines, autoantigens, immune modulation and activation of immune receptors. Currently, this field is abundant with advances in research seeking to understand oral health and dysbiosis with evidence not just from preclinical and clinical studies but also with data from metagenomic and OMICS studies.

We feel it is the need to the hour to gather more evidence to further explore oral health, dysbiosis and novel techniques to modulate bacteria, host response and prevent disease. In this Special Issue, we invite papers which include clinical trials, cross-sectional examinations, and longitudinal studies, along with scoping, narrative and systematic reviews dealing with oral health and dysbiosis.

Dr. Vinayak Joshi
Dr. Eswar Kandaswamy
Prof. Dr. Dileep Sharma
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Dentistry Journal is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • oral health
  • oral dysbiosis
  • host–microbe interactions
  • oral microbiome
  • oral biofilm
  • periodontitis

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

11 pages, 621 KiB  
Article
Association of F. alocis and D. pneumosintes with Periodontitis Disease Severity and Red Complex Bacteria
by Hawaabi F. M. Shaikh, Pratima U. Oswal, Manohar Suresh Kugaji, Sandeep S. Katti, Kishore Gajanan Bhat, Eswar Kandaswamy and Vinayak M. Joshi
Dent. J. 2024, 12(4), 105; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj12040105 - 12 Apr 2024
Viewed by 884
Abstract
Oral biofilms are considered the principal etiological agent in the development of periodontitis. Novel species that may contribute to periodontitis and dysbiosis have been identified recently. The study aims to evaluate the presence of F. alocis and D. pneumosintes in healthy and diseased [...] Read more.
Oral biofilms are considered the principal etiological agent in the development of periodontitis. Novel species that may contribute to periodontitis and dysbiosis have been identified recently. The study aims to evaluate the presence of F. alocis and D. pneumosintes in healthy and diseased patients and their association with clinical parameters and with red complex bacteria. The study included 60 subjects, with 30 patients each in the healthy and periodontitis groups. The clinical parameters were noted, and samples were subjected to DNA extraction followed by a polymerase chain reaction. Statistical analysis was performed using the Graph Pad Prism software. Results: F. alocis and D. pneumosintes were detected at a significantly higher percentage in the periodontitis group compared to the healthy group (p < 0.05). D. pneumosintes was significantly associated with T. forsythia in the periodontitis group (p < 0.05). Both of these organisms were present in sites with higher clinical attachment loss (p < 0.05). This study demonstrated that both F. alocis and D. pneumosintes were detected at a significantly higher percentage in periodontitis subjects and were detected more frequently in sites with a greater clinical attachment loss. It was also evident that both F. alocis and D. pneumosintes can be present independently of other putative periodontal pathogens. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oral Health and Dysbiosis)
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