Oral Hygiene and Public Health

A special issue of Dentistry Journal (ISSN 2304-6767). This special issue belongs to the section "Oral Hygiene, Periodontology and Peri-implant Diseases".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 6 September 2024 | Viewed by 4504

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Rutgers School of Dental Medicine, Newark, NJ, USA
Interests: dental hard tissues; caries; tooth wear; tooth sensitivity; periodontal disease; microbiome and the dental tissues; dental product formulation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In this Special Issue we will focus on professional education as a driving force in spreading modern, evidence-based concepts of the microbiome–host interaction, which is critical to improving health. We know that many factors influence the composition of the microbiome and that these factors are critical in health and disease. With the tremendous growth of scientific knowledge, the educator plays an important role as the impartial agent of knowledge transfer between the laboratory and the practice setting.

Topics to be covered:

  • Oral hygiene and dysbiosis
    Dental diseases are generally chronic and a product of dysbiosis as opposed to infection alone. Interestingly, when plaque thickens the environment changes, leading to dysbiosis. The potential of oral hygiene measures in reversing disease-promoting dysbiosis will be described for several dental diseases.  This section will include the status of evidence concerning methods to control the biofilm.
  • The lifestyle–microbiome connection
    Contemporary research has clearly implied diet and nutrition as important factors in dysbiosis. The changes these factors can produce will be discussed. This section will include an overview of experimental and clinical studies.

Dr. Kenneth Markowitz
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Dentistry Journal is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • plaque
  • dysbiosis
  • demineralization
  • virulence factors
  • host response

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

13 pages, 975 KiB  
Article
Periodontal Health Status in Adults Exposed to Tobacco Heating System Aerosol and Cigarette Smoke vs. Non-Smokers: A Cross-Sectional Study
by Ivana Mišković, Davor Kuiš, Stjepan Špalj, Aleksandar Pupovac and Jelena Prpić
Dent. J. 2024, 12(2), 26; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj12020026 - 29 Jan 2024
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Abstract
Tobacco heating systems (THS) are new products on the market, advertised as a less harmful alternative for smokers, in which tobacco is heated and not burned like in conventional cigarettes. This research explored the effect on periodontal tissues in contact with heating and [...] Read more.
Tobacco heating systems (THS) are new products on the market, advertised as a less harmful alternative for smokers, in which tobacco is heated and not burned like in conventional cigarettes. This research explored the effect on periodontal tissues in contact with heating and burning tobacco residual products (smoke and tobacco). Methods: The sample included 66 subjects, patients of the Clinic of Dentistry in Rijeka, Croatia, aged 26–56 (median 38), 64% females. Three age- and gender-matched groups were formed (each N = 22): non-smokers, classic cigarettes smokers and THS smokers. Probing depth (PD) and clinical attachment loss (CAL) were primary research parameters. Results: Three groups differed in average PD and CAL (p ≤ 0.002), with cigarette smokers having the highest and non-smokers the lowest values (p ≤ 0.002). THS consumers generally had lower values of periodontal indices than smokers, but only CAL differed significantly (p = 0.011). Periodontal indices CAL and PD were worse in THS consumers than non-smokers, but they did not reach a level of statistical significance. Cigarette smoking was the only predictor of periodontitis (average CAL ≥ 4 mm) in logistic regression models, with an odds ratio of 4.7 (95% confidence interval 1.2–18.3; p = 0.027). Conclusions: Exposure to nicotine-containing aerosol of THS in adults has a less harmful effect on periodontal tissues, measurable through periodontal indices (PD and CAL), compared to burning tobacco of conventional cigarettes. THS, presented as an alternative product to classic cigarettes, also has a detrimental effect on the periodontium. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oral Hygiene and Public Health)
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10 pages, 1439 KiB  
Article
Design and Initial Evaluation of a Novel Oral Hygiene Technology for a Special Needs Population: A New Way to Clean
by Maxine Strickland, Steven Mills, Bhargavi Dasari, Kenneth Markowitz and Carla Cugini
Dent. J. 2023, 11(9), 224; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj11090224 - 20 Sep 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1412
Abstract
9.4 million People have swallowing problems in the US. In special needs populations, routine oral hygiene procedures such as tooth brushing can result in aspiration of microbial laden fluids leading to a significant systemic challenge. Aspiration may lead to pneumonia in susceptible populations. [...] Read more.
9.4 million People have swallowing problems in the US. In special needs populations, routine oral hygiene procedures such as tooth brushing can result in aspiration of microbial laden fluids leading to a significant systemic challenge. Aspiration may lead to pneumonia in susceptible populations. These circumstances indicate the need for innovative approaches to oral hygiene for special needs, convalescent, the elderly populations, and young children learning to brush who can ingest excess fluoride which causes mottled enamel. Methods include describing some of the design considerations of the new prototype fabrication and microbiological evaluation of this new device, as well a comparison study of the versions 2 and 3 of the oral care device. Results concluded that version 3.0 regarding patient ease of use was better in comparison to version 2, which was the major difference, and 90% in both groups said they would recommend the new toothbrush. In the microbiological evaluation no growth was seen on any plates containing samples from either the experimental or the control after 48 h of incubation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oral Hygiene and Public Health)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Iron Deficiency Anemia and Its Impact on Oral Health: A Comprehensive Review
Authors: Kabilan Velliyagounder; Krupa Chavan; Kenneth Markowitz
Affiliation: Department of Oral Biology, Rutgers School of Dental Medicine
Abstract: Abstract: Oral disease interventions primarily focus on behavioral changes like dietary improvements and better oral hygiene. However, recognizing the influence of biological factors, including genetics and early-life nutrition, is crucial. Iron deficiency (ID) and its advanced form, iron deficiency anemia (IDA), affect nearly two billion people globally, especially children and pregnant women. This review synthesizes data from human and animal studies to illuminate IDA's role in oral disease development. Our review utilized PubMed and EBSCO to conduct a thorough literature search, using keywords like "iron deficiency anemia," "iron deficiency," "oral diseases," "oral manifestations," "periodontal diseases," "dental caries," and "oral candidiasis." IDA prevalence is notably high among pregnant women and young children. Both IDA and early childhood caries (ECC) disproportionately affect impoverished populations, highlighting the socioeconomic dimension of this issue. IDA presents with various oral mucosal changes and is closely linked to candidiasis. Additionally, IDA can hinder tooth development and weaken the immune response. Multiple population surveys reveal a significant association between ECC and IDA. While some studies have explored the IDA-periodontal disease link, the current evidence is relatively limited in robustness. In conclusion, more comprehensive longitudinal studies are essential to deepen our understanding of the IDA-oral disease connection. Investigating the under-lying biological mechanisms is critical to developing effective interventions, particularly for vulnerable populations affected by IDA.

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