Esthetic Dentistry: Current Perspectives and Future Prospects

A special issue of Dentistry Journal (ISSN 2304-6767).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2024 | Viewed by 2860

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Restorative Dentistry, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Western University, London, ON N6A 5C1, Canada
Interests: implant dentistry; esthetic dentistry dental prosthesis; fixed prosthodontics; dental materials; aesthetic dentistry; clinical dentistry; restorative dentistry; veneers; dental education

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are pleased to announce a Special Issue on esthetic dentistry and invite you to submit your work for consideration. This issue will showcase the latest developments, methods, and trends in the field of esthetic dentistry. We are looking for original research papers, clinical case reports, review articles, and novel approaches that cover various aspects of esthetic dentistry, such as smile design, tooth restoration, orthodontics, prosthodontics, and cosmetic procedures.

We welcome papers that address the topics mentioned above, as well as other topics related to materials, technologies, patient satisfaction, psychological factors, and emerging concepts. We hope that you will join us in sharing your knowledge and experience as this will contribute to advancements in the field of esthetic dentistry.

Dr. Gildo Santos
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Dentistry Journal is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • esthetic dentistry
  • ceramics
  • composite layering
  • veneers
  • crowns
  • dental implants
  • CAD/CAM dentistry
  • digital dentistry
  • minimally invasive dentistry
  • crown lengthening

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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16 pages, 1025 KiB  
Article
Comparing Zirconium Crown Marginal Adaptation in Preparations with Two Different Occlusal Reductions
by Ali Khekan and Bernd Kordaß
Dent. J. 2024, 12(3), 77; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj12030077 - 19 Mar 2024
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Abstract
This study aimed to assess and contrast the effects on the vertical marginal fit of full contour CAD/CAM-generated monolithic zirconia crowns at pre- and post-cementation levels with various occlusal reduction schemes (planar and flat) and cements. Forty sound human maxillary first premolars were [...] Read more.
This study aimed to assess and contrast the effects on the vertical marginal fit of full contour CAD/CAM-generated monolithic zirconia crowns at pre- and post-cementation levels with various occlusal reduction schemes (planar and flat) and cements. Forty sound human maxillary first premolars were sampled for this study. The samples were divided into two main groups with twenty samples in each group according to the occlusal reduction scheme as follows: Group A included a chamfer finishing line design with a planar occlusal reduction scheme and Group B included a chamfer finishing line design with a flat occlusal reduction scheme. Each group was sampled into two subgroups (n = 10) based on the type of cement as follows: resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Fuji Plus) for subgroups A1 and B1, and a universal adhesive system (Duo Estecem II) for subgroups A2 and B2. Marginal gaps were tested in four indentations using a Dino light stereomicroscope (230×). Paired T-tests and Student’s t-tests were used to analyze the data. Before cementation, subgroup A1 scored the lowest mean of vertical marginal gap values, while subgroup B2 scored the highest mean; following cementation, subgroup A1 scored the lowest mean of vertical marginal gap values, and subgroup B2 scored the highest mean of vertical marginal gap values. A chamfer finishing line design with a planar occlusal reduction scheme could be a preferable occlusal reduction scheme. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Esthetic Dentistry: Current Perspectives and Future Prospects)
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22 pages, 2500 KiB  
Systematic Review
A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Comparing Surgical and Nonsurgical Treatments for Excessive Gingival Display
by Mahdis Maleki, Bo Huang, Vanessa C. Mendes, Marco F. Caminiti and Yoav Finer
Dent. J. 2024, 12(6), 154; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj12060154 - 22 May 2024
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Abstract
Excessive gingival display (EGD) is defined as more than 2 mm of gingiva display above the maxillary incisors at maximum smile. Various skeletal, dental, and soft tissue etiological factors for EGD have been suggested. This study assessed the effectiveness and stability of surgical [...] Read more.
Excessive gingival display (EGD) is defined as more than 2 mm of gingiva display above the maxillary incisors at maximum smile. Various skeletal, dental, and soft tissue etiological factors for EGD have been suggested. This study assessed the effectiveness and stability of surgical (SX) and nonsurgical (NSX) interventions for correction of EGD through a systematic review and meta-analysis following PRISMA 2020 guidelines. An electronic search of Ovid MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL, Scopus, Web of Science, and LILACS was conducted (2010–2023). Results were expressed as mean change in gingival display using the random-effects model at 1, 3, 6, and 12-month follow-up. At 1 month, SX and NSX treatments yielded a comparable mean reduction of 3.50 mm (2.13–4.86) and 3.43 mm (2.67–4.19) in gingival display, respectively. However, by 6 months, NSX treatments showed a reduction of 0.51 mm compared to 2.86 mm with SX treatments. SX outcomes remained stable past 6 months, while NSX outcomes partially relapsed at 6 months and returned to baseline levels at 12 months. Notably, NSX treatments were more effective in cases with mild initial EGD, while SX treatments showed a better outcome in severe cases. To draw more robust conclusions regarding the treatment outcomes, future primary studies of greater rigor are required. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Esthetic Dentistry: Current Perspectives and Future Prospects)
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17 pages, 5460 KiB  
Systematic Review
Is a White Diet Necessary for Tooth Bleaching Procedures? A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
by Louis Hardan, Rim Bourgi, Abigailt Flores-Ledesma, Walter Devoto, Emma Devoto, Miguel Ángel Fernández-Barrera, Naji Kharouf and Carlos Enrique Cuevas-Suárez
Dent. J. 2024, 12(4), 118; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj12040118 - 22 Apr 2024
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Abstract
The aim of this investigation was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis to determine the necessity of a white diet during or following a bleaching procedure. This systematic review and meta-analysis followed the PRISMA guidelines meticulously. The research question was: Is a [...] Read more.
The aim of this investigation was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis to determine the necessity of a white diet during or following a bleaching procedure. This systematic review and meta-analysis followed the PRISMA guidelines meticulously. The research question was: Is a white diet necessary during and/or after a bleaching treatment? In vitro studies or clinical trials reporting the color change in bleached enamel after the use of a free-staining diet were considered for full-text review. For the analyses, a random-effects model was employed. Statistical significance was defined as a p-value < 0.05. A total of 17 documents were eligible for qualitative analysis: 5 clinical trials and 12 in vitro studies. Only data from the clinical trials were included in the meta-analysis. For at-home bleaching, differences in the color among the subjects were not statistically significant during the first (p = 0.64), second (p = 0.26) or third (p = 0.43) weeks of treatment. Also, the color difference one month after finishing the bleaching treatment were not statistically significant (p = 0.27). The color difference one month after finishing an in-office treatment showed that the restrictions on diet did not significantly improve the bleaching outcomes (p = 0.90). According to the findings of this review, dietary restrictions are not necessary during or after bleaching procedures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Esthetic Dentistry: Current Perspectives and Future Prospects)
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