Advancements in Thoracic Surgical Oncology

A special issue of Current Oncology (ISSN 1718-7729). This special issue belongs to the section "Surgical Oncology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2023) | Viewed by 6916

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Head of the of Thoracic Surgery and Pulmonary Transplant Unit of the Umberto, Policlinic Hospital in Rome, Rome, Italy
Interests: lung cancer surgery; video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) uniportal VATS; tracheal surgery; mediastinal and thymus surgery; pleural and esophageal surgery

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Guest Editor
Thoracic Surgeon, Gleneagles Hong Kong Hospital, International Medical Centre, OT&P Healthcare, Hong Kong
Interests: lung cancer surgery; video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) uniportal VATS; mediastinal and thymus surgery

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Guest Editor
Head of the of Thoracic Surgery and Pulmonary Transplant Unit of the Umberto, Policlinic Hospital in Rome, Rome, Italy
Interests: lung cancer surgery; video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) uniportal VATS; tracheal surgery; mediastinal and thymus surgery; pleural and esophageal surgery

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Guest Editor
Robotic and Minimally Invasive Thoracic Surgery, Robotic Multispeciality Center for Surgery, University Hospital of Pisa, Pisa, Italy
Interests: lung cancer surgery; robotic surgery mediastinal and thymus surgery; pleural surgery
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
1. Department of Medical-Surgical Science and Translational Medicine, "Sapienza" University of Rome, Rome, Italy
2. Department of Surgery, Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA
Interests: locally advanced lung cancer; tracheal reconstruction; bronco-vascular reconstruction; thoracic mini invasive surgery (robotic and uniportal vats); chest wall surgery and mediastinal diseases

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The latest advancements in clinical practice and surgical oncology have revolutionized the current concept of care provided to patients.

With the advancement of technologies available, healthcare is undergoing a cultural transformation where these aiding advancements are becoming ever more indispensable to provide the “best practice” possible. “Surgery” is one of the areas that has benefited the most from these advancements, as high technology has greatly aided in performing the increasingly complex procedures with the best outcomes possible.

Lung cancer represents the most diagnosed malignancy and the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the world.

The substantial advances in screening methods, early diagnosis, and breakthroughs in treatments have increased survival rates among patients with lung cancer.

These are just some of the key elements of the ongoing revolution, which in association with "advanced imaging", "machine learning", "big data", "virtual simulation" and "tissue analysis" integrated with the most modern robotic platforms, constitute what is now called "digital surgery".

Thanks to novel therapies such as immunotherapy, new intra-operative imaging techniques, and new real-time diagnostic methodologies, we are advancing to obtain patient’s tailored therapies for lung cancer patients.

With this Special Issue, we aim at obtaining an overview of the latest advancements available in the field of lung cancer and mediastinal lesions. These advancements have drastically improved patients’ conditions and are allowing a progressive achievement of patient-tailored treatments with better prognosis and quality of life for oncologic patients.

In this Special Issue, original research articles, reviews, perspectives, communications, and opinion manuscripts are welcome.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Prof. Franca M.A. Melfi
Prof. Alan Sihoe
Prof. Federico Venuta
Dr. Carmelina C. Zirafa
Prof. Dr. Mohsen Ibrahim
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Current Oncology is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • surgical oncology
  • lung cancer
  • immuno-oncology
  • translational research
  • advanced technology
  • multi-disciplinary approach
  • immunotherapy
  • targeted therapies

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

15 pages, 1180 KiB  
Article
Are Extensive Open Lung Resections for Elderly Patients with Lung Cancer Justified?
by Nikolaos Panagopoulos, Konstantinos Grapatsas, Vasileios Leivaditis, Michail Galanis and Dimitrios Dougenis
Curr. Oncol. 2023, 30(6), 5470-5484; https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol30060414 - 5 Jun 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1587
Abstract
Background: Older patients with malignancies are more comorbid than younger ones and are usually undertreated only because of their age. The aim of this study is to investigate the safety of open anatomical lung resections for lung cancer in elderly patients. Methods: We [...] Read more.
Background: Older patients with malignancies are more comorbid than younger ones and are usually undertreated only because of their age. The aim of this study is to investigate the safety of open anatomical lung resections for lung cancer in elderly patients. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed all patients who underwent lung resection for lung cancer in our institution and categorized them into two groups: the elderly group (≥70 years old) and the control (<70). Results: In total, 135 patients were included in the elderly group and 375 in the control. Elderly patients were more frequently diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma (59.3% vs. 51.5%, p = 0.037), higher differentiated tumors (12.6% vs. 6.4%, p = 0.014), and at an earlier stage (stage I: 55.6% for elderly vs. 36.6%, p = 0.002). Elderly patients were more vulnerable to postoperative pneumonia (3.7% vs. 0.8%, p = 0.034), lung atelectasis (7.4% vs. 2.9%, p = 0.040), and pleural empyema (3.2% vs. 0%, p = 0.042), however, with no increased 30-day-mortality (5.2% for elderly vs. 2.7%, p = 0.168). Survival was comparable in both groups (43.4 vs. 45.3 months, p = 0.579). Conclusions: Elderly patients should not be excluded from open major lung resections as the survival benefit is not reduced in selected patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advancements in Thoracic Surgical Oncology)
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9 pages, 544 KiB  
Article
Coaxial Drainage versus Standard Chest Tube after Pulmonary Lobectomy: A Randomized Controlled Study
by Massimiliano Bassi, Emilia Mottola, Sara Mantovani, Davide Amore, Andreina Pagini, Daniele Diso, Jacopo Vannucci, Camilla Poggi, Tiziano De Giacomo, Erino Angelo Rendina, Federico Venuta and Marco Anile
Curr. Oncol. 2022, 29(7), 4455-4463; https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol29070354 - 22 Jun 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1915
Abstract
Chest tubes are routinely inserted after thoracic surgery procedures in different sizes and numbers. The aim of this study is to assess the efficacy of Smart Drain Coaxial drainage compared with two standard chest tubes in patients undergoing thoracotomy for pulmonary lobectomy. Ninety-eight [...] Read more.
Chest tubes are routinely inserted after thoracic surgery procedures in different sizes and numbers. The aim of this study is to assess the efficacy of Smart Drain Coaxial drainage compared with two standard chest tubes in patients undergoing thoracotomy for pulmonary lobectomy. Ninety-eight patients (57 males and 41 females, mean age 68.3 ± 7.4 years) with lung cancer undergoing open pulmonary lobectomy were randomized in two groups: 50 received one upper 28-Fr and one lower 32-Fr standard chest tube (ST group) and 48 received one 28-Fr Smart Drain Coaxial tube (SDC group). Hospitalization, quantity of fluid output, air leaks, radiograph findings, pain control and costs were assessed. SDC group showed shorter hospitalization (7.3 vs. 6.1 days, p = 0.02), lower pain in postoperative day-1 (p = 0.02) and a lower use of analgesic drugs (p = 0.04). Pleural effusion drainage was lower in SDC group in the first postoperative day (median 400.0 ± 200.0 mL vs. 450.0 ± 193.8 mL, p = 0.04) and as a mean of first three PODs (median 325.0 ± 137.5 mL vs. 362.5 ± 96.7 mL, p = 0.01). No difference in terms of fluid retention, residual pleural space, subcutaneous emphysema and complications after chest tubes removal was found. In conclusion, Smart Drain Coaxial chest tube seems a feasible option after thoracotomy for pulmonary lobectomy. The SDC group showed a shorter hospitalization and decreased analgesic drugs use and, thus, a reduction of costs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advancements in Thoracic Surgical Oncology)
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8 pages, 510 KiB  
Article
Inflammatory Indexes as Predictive Biomarkers of Postoperative Complications in Oncological Thoracic Surgery
by Giorgio Carlo Ginesu, Panagiotis Paliogiannis, Claudio F. Feo, Maria Laura Cossu, Antonio Mario Scanu, Alessandro Fancellu, Alessandro Giuseppe Fois, Angelo Zinellu, Teresa Perra, Simone Veneroni and Alberto Porcu
Curr. Oncol. 2022, 29(5), 3425-3432; https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol29050276 - 8 May 2022
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2402
Abstract
The role of inflammatory responses in predicting outcomes in oncological thoracic surgery is still unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate a series of blood count inflammation indexes as predicting factors for postoperative complications. We retrospectively studied 249 patients undergoing elective [...] Read more.
The role of inflammatory responses in predicting outcomes in oncological thoracic surgery is still unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate a series of blood count inflammation indexes as predicting factors for postoperative complications. We retrospectively studied 249 patients undergoing elective thoracic surgery in our institution between 2008 and 2020. A total of 184 patients underwent open surgery, and 65 underwent VATS. The neutrophil-to-lymphocyte (NLR), monocyte-to-lymphocyte (MLR), and platelet-to-lymphocyte (PLR) ratios, Systemic Inflammation Response Index (SIRI) were calculated preoperatively and on the first and fourth postoperative days, as well as a new derivative index, the Aggregate Inflammation Systemic Index (AISI). Univariate correlations evidenced a statistically significant association between the NLR at the fourth postoperative day and the occurrence of surgical complications in the global cohort (rho = 0.15, p = 0.03). A similar significant association with MLR on the fourth postoperative day is found in the open group (rho = −0.15, p = 0.048). NLR and LMR on the fourth postoperative day are associated with postoperative complications in the whole and open groups, respectively. Simple, easy-to-perform and inexpensive, blood cell count indexes may be useful in predicting complications in oncological thoracic surgery. A greater number of broader, prospective, randomized studies are necessary to confirm these findings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advancements in Thoracic Surgical Oncology)
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