Quality of Life and Satisfaction with Outcome among Cancer Survivors

A special issue of Current Oncology (ISSN 1718-7729). This special issue belongs to the section "Palliative and Supportive Care".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2023) | Viewed by 1448

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Surgical Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montréal, QC H4A 3J1, Canada
Interests: cancer care improvement; Improving access and quality of cancer care; retroperitoneal sarcoma; HIPEC; melanoma

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

With an improvement in the efficacy of cancer treatments and increase in patient survival, there is a rising interest and focus on long-term quality of life and patient satisfaction with outcomes among cancer survivors. Exciting avenues of research in this arena have shown the impact that a cancer diagnosis and treatments can have on patients and their families. As survivorship improves, we are starting to see the long-term effects of cancer treatments whether they be radiotherapy, surgery, chemotherapy, immunotherapy, or targeted therapy. Understating the impact on quality of life and the real-life consequences to our patients is paramount in providing adequate support, decreasing distress, and improving outcomes.

In this Special Issue, original research articles and reviews are welcome. Research areas may include (but are not limited to) the following:

  1. Long-term side effects of cancer treatments (especially new therapies)
  2. Designing a successful survivorship program
  3. Patient satisfaction 
  4. Incorporating quality of life concerns in consent to cancer treatments
  5. Addressing distress in cancer patients
  6. Barriers in return to the workforce after a cancer diagnosis
  7. Fertility preservation and outcomes
  8. Long-term financial toxicity of cancer treatments
  9. Survivorship care plan
  10. Tools for improving quality of life and satisfaction with treatment outcomes among cancer survivors

I look forward to receiving your contributions.

Dr. Sinziana Dumitra
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • quality of life
  • cancer care
  • outcome among cancer survivors
  • cancer survivorship

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

15 pages, 1295 KiB  
Article
Head and Neck Cancer: A Study on the Complex Relationship between QoL and Swallowing Function
by Daniel Strüder, Johanna Ebert, Friederike Kalle, Sebastian P. Schraven, Lennart Eichhorst, Robert Mlynski and Wilma Großmann
Curr. Oncol. 2023, 30(12), 10336-10350; https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol30120753 - 06 Dec 2023
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Abstract
Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is linked to significant morbidity, adversely affecting survival and functional capacity. Post-treatment challenges such as pain, dysphonia, and dysphagia are common, prompting increased attention in survivorship research. Quality of Life (QoL) questionnaires, especially the MD Anderson [...] Read more.
Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is linked to significant morbidity, adversely affecting survival and functional capacity. Post-treatment challenges such as pain, dysphonia, and dysphagia are common, prompting increased attention in survivorship research. Quality of Life (QoL) questionnaires, especially the MD Anderson Dysphagia Inventory (MDADI), are prevalent outcome measures in clinical studies but often lack parallel objective swallowing function evaluations, leading to potential outcome discrepancies. This study aimed to illuminate the relationship between subjective QoL (EQ-5D-5L and MDADI) measures and objective swallowing function (evaluated via Fiberoptic Endoscopic Evaluation of Swallowing, FEES) in patients with HNSCC. The analysis revealed a notable discordance between objective measures of swallowing function, such as the Penetration–Aspiration Scale (PAS) and residue ratings in the vallecula or piriform sinus, and patients’ subjective QoL assessments (p = 0.21). Despite the lack of correlation, swallowing-related QoL, as measured by the MDADI, was more indicative of disease severity than generic QoL assessments. Generic QoL scores did not demonstrate substantial variation between patients. In contrast, MDADI scores significantly declined with advancing tumor stage, multimodal therapy, and reliance on feeding tubes. However, the clinical significance of this finding was tempered by the less than 10-point difference in MDADI scores. The findings of this study underline the limitations of QoL measures as standalone assessments in patients with HNSCC, given their reliance on patient-perceived impairment. While subjective QoL is a crucial aspect of evaluating therapeutic success and patient-centric outcomes, it may fail to capture critical clinical details such as silent aspirations. Consequently, QoL assessments should be augmented by objective evaluations of swallowing function in clinical research and practice to ensure a holistic understanding of patient well-being and treatment impact. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Quality of Life and Satisfaction with Outcome among Cancer Survivors)
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