Ovarian Cancer in the Age of Precision Medicine

A special issue of Current Oncology (ISSN 1718-7729). This special issue belongs to the section "Gynecologic Oncology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 August 2024 | Viewed by 3217

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Ovarian Cancer Canada, Toronto, ON M5A 1E3, Canada
Interests: ovarian cancer; prevention; genetics; molecular pathology; precision oncology; patient engagement

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Ovarian cancer remains the most fatal gynecologic malignancy, with no effective screening modalities or diagnostic tests. While recent treatment advances are enabling a subset of people diagnosed with ovarian cancer to live longer with a better quality of life, few options exist for many patients and long-term survival outcomes have not changed in 50 years. This Special Issue will focus on the progress, challenges, and promise of omics to enable precision medicine for individuals with all types of ovarian cancer and how advances in precision medicine along the entire care continuum (prevention, diagnosis, treatment, survivorship) are needed to improve patient outcomes. The important role of the patient voice in shaping precision medicine strategies—in addition to equitable access to advances for all individuals with or at risk for ovarian cancer—will also be included.

In this Special Issue, original research articles, commentaries, and reviews are welcome. Research areas may include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • New samples, technologies, and/or approaches for early detection, most notably for high-grade serous ovarian/tubal/peritoneal cancer;
  • Targeted prevention strategies based on lifetime risk of ovarian cancer;
  • Novel precision treatments for less common types of ovarian cancer;
  • Understanding and overcoming resistance to targeted treatments;
  • Using omics to increase the efficacy of immune-based treatments in ovarian cancer;
  • Patient engagement in basic, preclinical, and clinical research investigating precision medicine strategies;
  • Novel approaches for personalized survivorship.

I look forward to receiving your contributions. 

Dr. Alicia A. Tone
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Current Oncology is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • ovarian cancer
  • omics
  • prevention
  • diagnosis
  • treatment
  • survivorship
  • equity
  • patient engagement
 

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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10 pages, 1507 KiB  
Article
The Development and Testing of a Patient Decision Aid for Individuals with Homologous Recombinant Proficient Ovarian Cancer Who Are Considering Niraparib Maintenance Therapy
by Laura Hopkins, Mark Carey, Linda Brown, Sabryna McCrea, Mark Milne, Dawne Tokaryk and Dawn Stacey
Curr. Oncol. 2024, 31(3), 1416-1425; https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol31030107 - 08 Mar 2024
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Abstract
New treatments for ovarian cancer are available that require trade-offs between progression-free survival and quality of life. The aim of this study was to develop a decision aid for patients with homologous recombinant proficient (HRP) tumors, as the benefit–harm ratio of niraparib needs [...] Read more.
New treatments for ovarian cancer are available that require trade-offs between progression-free survival and quality of life. The aim of this study was to develop a decision aid for patients with homologous recombinant proficient (HRP) tumors, as the benefit–harm ratio of niraparib needs consideration. This decision aid was created with a systematic and iterative development process based on the Ottawa Decision Support Framework. The decision aid was user-tested for acceptability, usability, and comprehensibility using a survey completed by a sample of patients with ovarian cancer and oncologists. This decision aid follows the International Patient Decision Aids Standards (IPDAS) criteria in its development. User-test respondents (n = 13 patients; 13 physicians) reported that the decision aid used language that was easy to follow (69% patients; 85% physicians), was an appropriate length (69% patients; 62% physicians) and provided the right amount of information (54% patients; 54% physicians). Most respondents (92% patients; 62% physicians) would recommend this decision aid for HRP patients considering niraparib. This is the first decision aid for patients with HRP ovarian cancers who are considering niraparib maintenance therapy. It is available on-line and is being further evaluated in a pragmatic clinical trial in Saskatchewan. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ovarian Cancer in the Age of Precision Medicine)
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Review

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16 pages, 1586 KiB  
Review
Ovarian Cancer: From Precursor Lesion Identification to Population-Based Prevention Programs
by Ramlogan Sowamber, Alexandra Lukey, David Huntsman and Gillian Hanley
Curr. Oncol. 2023, 30(12), 10179-10194; https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol30120741 - 29 Nov 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1518
Abstract
Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is a heterogeneous group of malignancies, including high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSC). HGSC is often diagnosed at advanced stages and is linked to TP53 variants. While BRCA variants elevate risk, most HGSC cases occur in individuals without known genetic [...] Read more.
Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is a heterogeneous group of malignancies, including high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSC). HGSC is often diagnosed at advanced stages and is linked to TP53 variants. While BRCA variants elevate risk, most HGSC cases occur in individuals without known genetic variants, necessitating prevention strategies for people without known high-risk genetic variants. Effective prevention programs are also needed due to the lack of traditional screening options. An emerging primary prevention strategy is opportunistic salpingectomy, which involves removing fallopian tubes during another planned pelvic surgery. Opportunistic salpingectomy offers a safe and cost-effective preventative option that is gaining global adoption. With the publication of the first cohort study of patients who underwent salpingectomy, specifically for cancer prevention, attention has turned to broadening opportunities for salpingectomy in addition to more targeted approaches. Prevention opportunities are promising with increasing adoption of salpingectomy and the increased understanding of the etiology of the distinct histotypes of ovarian cancer. Yet, further research on targeted risk-reducing salpingectomy with thoughtful consideration of equity is necessary to reduce death and suffering from ovarian cancer. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ovarian Cancer in the Age of Precision Medicine)
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