Surface Modification Treatments of Metallic Materials

A special issue of Crystals (ISSN 2073-4352). This special issue belongs to the section "Crystalline Metals and Alloys".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 24 May 2024 | Viewed by 3210

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
State Key Laboratory of Mechanical System and Vibration, School of Mechanical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, China
Interests: material processing; surface integrity; ultrasonic surface rolling; fatigue; microstructure; gear
Shanxi Key Laboratory of Precision Machining, College of Mechanical and Vehicle Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024, China
Interests: machining; surface strengthening processing; fatigue of materials; surface integrity

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Guest Editor
Manufacturing Laboratory, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 1138656, Japan
Interests: machining; surface integrity; vibration; gear

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Crystalline metals and alloys with distinguished mechanical properties and fatigue resistance have been universally applied in the critical components of the aviation industry. Fatigue failure is a common mode for aviation components owing to its harsh service conditions. In general, the surface integrity of manufactured components is essential since it directly influences fatigue crack initiation and initial propagation. However, it is challenging to manufacture parts with high surface integrity due to the poor machinability of high-strength metallic materials. On one hand, machining marks tend to become stress concentrators, which accelerates surface crack nucleation. On the other hand, machining-induced tensile residual stresses contribute to crack tip openings, which deteriorate the fatigue resistance of the parts. Therefore, the surface integrity of crystalline metals and alloys should be carefully improved by surface modification treatments, and it is essential to study its distribution characteristics subjected to different surface modification treatments. To date, many surface modification treatments have emerged from both the scientific and engineering fields, and more attention has been paid to utilizing them to improve the fatigue properties of the parts.

This Special Issue of Crystals aims to provide a forum for original research works and review articles on current advances in the research fields of surface modification of metallic materials. Areas of interest include but are not limited to shot peening, deep rolling, laser shock peening, ultrasonic surface rolling, surface mechanical attrition treatment, ultrasonic impact treatment, micro-forging, and mechanical machining, applied for surface modification of metallic materials. Aspects of investigations can be advanced surface modification techniques, surface integrity characterization, mechanical property evaluation, fatigue testing, simulation, and applications.

Dr. Jiaqiang Dang
Dr. Yong Wang
Dr. Zongwei Ren
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • surface modification
  • surface integrity
  • microstructure
  • residual stress
  • surface morphology
  • microhardness
  • metallic materials
  • mechanical property
  • fatigue
  • high-performance manufacturing

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

14 pages, 10035 KiB  
Article
Effect of Polyoxyethylene-Based Nonionic Surfactants on Chemical–Mechanical Polishing Performance of Monocrystalline Silicon Wafers
by Bowen Jiang, Jie Guan, Peng Zhao, Yulin Chen and Zefang Zhang
Crystals 2024, 14(5), 460; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst14050460 - 14 May 2024
Viewed by 322
Abstract
The use of surfactants is crucial in the chemical–mechanical polishing fluid system for silicon wafers. This paper examines the impact of the functional group structure of polyoxyethylene-based nonionic surfactants and the variation in the polyoxyethylene (EO) addition number on the polishing performance of [...] Read more.
The use of surfactants is crucial in the chemical–mechanical polishing fluid system for silicon wafers. This paper examines the impact of the functional group structure of polyoxyethylene-based nonionic surfactants and the variation in the polyoxyethylene (EO) addition number on the polishing performance of monocrystalline silicon wafers, to achieve the appropriate material removal rate and surface quality. The results demonstrated that the straight-chain structure of fatty alcohol polyoxyethylene ether (AEO-9) exhibited superior performance in wafer polishing compared to octylphenol polyoxyethylene ether (OP-9) and isoprenol polyoxyethylene ether (TPEG) and polyethylene glycol (PEG). By varying the number of EO additions of AEO-type surfactants, this study demonstrated that the polishing performance of monocrystalline silicon wafers was affected by the number of EO additions. The best polishing effect was achieved when the number of EO additions was nine. The mechanism of the role of polyoxyethylene-type nonionic surfactants in silicon wafer polishing was derived through polishing experiments, the contact angle, abrasive particle size analysis, zeta potential measurement, XPS, and other means of characterization. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Surface Modification Treatments of Metallic Materials)
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15 pages, 5216 KiB  
Article
Influence of Chloride Ion Concentration on Corrosion Behavior of WC–MgO Composite
by Bowen Fan, Tao Qin, Ying Zhang and Jinyi Wang
Crystals 2024, 14(5), 427; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst14050427 - 30 Apr 2024
Viewed by 393
Abstract
The influence of chloride ion (Cl) concentration on the corrosion mechanism of WC–MgO composites has been studied in this work. The results suggest that the corrosion resistance of WC–MgO composite decreases first and then increases with the increase in Cl [...] Read more.
The influence of chloride ion (Cl) concentration on the corrosion mechanism of WC–MgO composites has been studied in this work. The results suggest that the corrosion resistance of WC–MgO composite decreases first and then increases with the increase in Cl concentration. Solution conductivity and dissolved oxygen content are the main influence factors. The solution conductivity determines the charge transfer process, and the dissolved oxygen determines the cathodic oxygen absorption reaction. The corrosion characteristic is typical pitting corrosion. Meanwhile, the corrosion mechanism contains an oxidation process of the WC matrix and the dissolution destruction of the MgO toughening phase. The formation of the WO3 corrosion layer hinders the general corrosion to protect the inner material. However, the dissolution of MgO induces the initiation of pitting. The local alkaline caused by MgO dissolution promotes the dissolution of the WC matrix, which leads to the expansion of pitting. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Surface Modification Treatments of Metallic Materials)
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18 pages, 34602 KiB  
Article
Synergistic Effect of WS2 and Micro-Textures to Inhibit Graphitization and Delamination of Micro-Nano Diamond-Coated Tools
by Zhao Zhang, Xudong Qin, Silu Ma, Yang Liu, Liping Wang and Xinyang Zhao
Crystals 2023, 13(7), 1034; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst13071034 - 29 Jun 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 901
Abstract
Diamond-coated tools often fail due to coating graphitization and delamination caused by poor coating adhesion, large contact stress, and thermochemical reactions. To address these issues, this research utilized a combination of micro-nano double-layer diamond coating, WS2 coating, and micro-textures. The WS2 [...] Read more.
Diamond-coated tools often fail due to coating graphitization and delamination caused by poor coating adhesion, large contact stress, and thermochemical reactions. To address these issues, this research utilized a combination of micro-nano double-layer diamond coating, WS2 coating, and micro-textures. The WS2 coating inhibits the graphitization of the diamond coating through a transfer film mechanism, while the micro-textures and nanocrystalline diamond coating store WS2, resulting in a prolonged lubrication life. Additionally, the influence of micro-texture on coating-substrate residual stress and coating-substrate mechanical interlocking was discussed, and it was proved that proper micro-textures effectively improve the coating adhesion. Under the same cutting flux conditions, taking coating peeling as the judging standard, the cutting distance of textured WS2/Micro-Nano diamond coating tool is more than three times that of ordinary, diamond-coated tools, which greatly improves the service life of the tool. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Surface Modification Treatments of Metallic Materials)
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11 pages, 1559 KiB  
Article
Influences of Nonaqueous Slurry Components on Polishing 4H-SiC Substrate with a Fixed Abrasive Pad
by Jiyuan Zhong, Jiapeng Chen, Hanqiang Wang, Haibo Chen, Yunyun Gu, Juanfen Shen and Tao Sun
Crystals 2023, 13(6), 869; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst13060869 - 26 May 2023
Viewed by 1142
Abstract
4H-SiC wafers are more likely to sustain a lower material removal rate (MRR) and severe subsurface damage in conventional chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) methods. To overcome the material removal bottleneck imposed by aqueous chemistry, a high-efficiency polishing of 4H-SiC wafers method by applying [...] Read more.
4H-SiC wafers are more likely to sustain a lower material removal rate (MRR) and severe subsurface damage in conventional chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) methods. To overcome the material removal bottleneck imposed by aqueous chemistry, a high-efficiency polishing of 4H-SiC wafers method by applying reactive nonaqueous fluids to self-sharpening fixed abrasive pads has been proposed in our former research works. Furthermore, to improve the material removal rate and reduce the surface roughness Sa value of 4H-SiC substrates of the Si face, the effect of organic acid, H2O2, and Triton X-100 in nonaqueous slurry on 4H-SiC polishing was investigated. The MRR of 12.83 μm/h and the Sa of 1.45 nm can be obtained by the orthogonally optimized slurry consisting of 3 wt% H2O2, 0.5 wt% Triton X-100 at pH = 3. It is also found that the addition of different levels of oxidant H2O2 and surfactant Triton X-100 components not only increased the MRR of the 4H-SiC substrates of the Si face but also achieved a lower Sa value; in that, the polishing efficiency of the Si side of the 4H-SiC wafers and the surface quality of the 4H-SiC wafers could be effectively improved by the optimization of the polishing slurry. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Surface Modification Treatments of Metallic Materials)
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