Ceramic and Metallic Biomaterials. Application in Medical Sciences

A special issue of Coatings (ISSN 2079-6412). This special issue belongs to the section "Surface Coatings for Biomedicine and Bioengineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 May 2024 | Viewed by 12559

Special Issue Editor

National Institute of Research and Development for Technical Physics, 700050 Iasi, Romania
Interests: nanotechnology; nanomaterials; biocompatibility and biomedical applications of multifunctional nanoparticles; development of new materials for cancer detection and treatment; biosensors; solid-state materials chemistry; electrochemical synthesis; surface science

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nowadays, the development of new materials that can be used to treat, repair, diagnose, replace, or restore a function of the human body represents one of the key research topics for the worldwide scientists and medical industries. For example, metallic nanoparticles are studied for possible applications in biomedicine such as the manipulation of living cells (transportation, displacement, positioning, or cell separation) or cancer detection and treatment. Another important class of compounds that has attracted the attention of the scientific community is represented by ceramic biomaterials, which can be used for the replacement of various types of tissues (as implants or for the repair and reconstruction of various diseased parts of the body). The outperformance of a biomaterial is determined by its crystalline structure, microstructure, (such as grain size or porosity), biocompatibility, corrosion resistance, or mechanical properties. In this context, the development of new biomaterials with improved physical and mechanical properties and a low production cost, high availability, and good esthetics is imperative. This Special Issue, “Ceramic and Metallic Biomaterials. Application in Medical Sciences”, aims to explore the innovative progresses in the field of biomaterials used for the detection, treatment, or replacement of injured tissues, in order to develop practical solutions for clinical practice.

List of the potential topics:

  1. Metallic biomaterials for manipulation of living cells;
  2. New approaches in cancer detection and treatment;
  3. Advances in dental restorations materials;
  4. Tissue engineering: from idea to clinic.

Dr. Oana Dragos-Pinzaru
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Coatings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • ceramic biomaterials
  • metallic biomaterials
  • dental materials
  • medical application
  • biocompatibility
  • manipulation of living cells
  • cancer detection
  • cancer treatment
  • implants
  • tissue engineering

Published Papers (8 papers)

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Editorial

Jump to: Research, Review

4 pages, 190 KiB  
Editorial
Special Issue: Ceramic and Metallic Biomaterials Nanoparticles for Applications in Medical Sciences
Coatings 2022, 12(7), 998; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings12070998 - 15 Jul 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1091
Abstract
Nowadays, the development of new materials that can be used to treat, repair, diagnose, replace, or restore a function of the human body represents one of the key research topics for the worldwide scientists and medical industries [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ceramic and Metallic Biomaterials. Application in Medical Sciences)

Research

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15 pages, 6768 KiB  
Article
Hybrid Polymer–Inorganic Coatings Enriched with Carbon Nanotubes on Ti-6Al-4V Alloy for Biomedical Applications
Coatings 2023, 13(10), 1813; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings13101813 - 23 Oct 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 814
Abstract
Bone tissue degeneration, caused by disease as well as trauma, is a problem affecting many social groups in the 21st century. It involves pain and reduced patient comfort. Developments in materials engineering allow for the design of novel, innovative materials that can be [...] Read more.
Bone tissue degeneration, caused by disease as well as trauma, is a problem affecting many social groups in the 21st century. It involves pain and reduced patient comfort. Developments in materials engineering allow for the design of novel, innovative materials that can be used in therapies to promote bone regeneration. This work presents the preparation of a ceramic–polymer coating modified with carbon nanotubes on a titanium alloy for biomedical applications. The ceramic part is hydroxyapatite synthesized by the wet precipitation method using orthophosphate and calcium hydroxide. The polymer of choice was polyethylene glycol. A UV light synthesis method was successfully applied to obtain coatings characterized by continuity and full crosslinking. Extensive physicochemical analysis and incubation studies were carried out. Interactions between coatings and fluids mimicking artificial biological environments were analyzed for 9 days, i.e., in fluids such as SBF solution, artificial saliva, and distilled water. During the in vitro incubation, changes in pH values were measured by potentiometric tests, and ionic conductivity was measured by analyzing conductometry. After incubation, the surface morphology was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) together with energy-dispersive (EDS) microanalysis, which made it possible to determine the presence of individual elements on the surface, as well as to observe the appearance of new apatite layers. Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometry was also performed before and at the end of the incubation period. On the basis of the presented studies, it was concluded that coatings that contain nanotubes are bioactive and do not negatively affect the properties of the coatings. Bioactivity was confirmed microscopically by observing new apatite layers after incubation in SBF, which were identified as phosphorus and calcium deposits. Degradation of the polymer phase was observed in the artificial saliva. These materials require further study, including safety analysis, but they demonstrate potential for further work. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ceramic and Metallic Biomaterials. Application in Medical Sciences)
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13 pages, 6852 KiB  
Article
In Vitro Characterization of Doped Bioglass 45S5/HAp Coatings Obtained by CoBlastTM Deposition
Coatings 2023, 13(10), 1775; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings13101775 - 16 Oct 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1013
Abstract
Bone replacement is one of the major medical procedures in the oral surgery field due to the progressive ageing population and to illness or trauma in younger age groups. The use of implants without biological activity and effective osseointegration increases the chances of [...] Read more.
Bone replacement is one of the major medical procedures in the oral surgery field due to the progressive ageing population and to illness or trauma in younger age groups. The use of implants without biological activity and effective osseointegration increases the chances of implant failure. This work aims to improve the interaction between implants and bone by using Bioglass 45S5 (BG)/hydroxyapatite (HAp) mixtures, including copper-, zinc-, and cerium-doped BG, as well as co-doping by the mentioned metals, as coatings produced by the CoBlastTM technique. All coatings present a uniform coverage of the Ti-6Al-4V substrate. Furthermore, in vitro testing using human osteosarcoma Saos-2 cells indicated that BG/HAp coatings have no cytotoxic effect, and the used of doping agents did not alter cell adhesion, proliferation, or alkaline phosphatase (ALP) expression when compared to undoped coating. These results demonstrate that BG/HAp by CoBlastTM can be a solution to improve implants’ osseointegration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ceramic and Metallic Biomaterials. Application in Medical Sciences)
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13 pages, 6745 KiB  
Article
Enhanced Multimodal Effect of Chemotherapy, Hyperthermia and Magneto-Mechanic Actuation of Silver-Coated Magnetite on Cancer Cells
Coatings 2023, 13(2), 406; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings13020406 - 10 Feb 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1294
Abstract
Currently, various methods based on magnetic nanoparticles are being considered for the treatment of cancer. Among these, magnetic hyperthermia and magneto-mechanical actuation are the most tested physical methods that have shown promising results when applied both separately and in combination. However, combining them [...] Read more.
Currently, various methods based on magnetic nanoparticles are being considered for the treatment of cancer. Among these, magnetic hyperthermia and magneto-mechanical actuation are the most tested physical methods that have shown promising results when applied both separately and in combination. However, combining them with specific drugs can further improve antitumor efficiency. In this study, we performed a systematic analysis to determine the best combination of hyperthermia, magneto-mechanical actuation of silver-coated magnetite nanoparticles (MNP@Ag) and chemotherapy (mitoxantrone) capable of destroying tumor cells in vitro while maintaining normal cells in their state of increased viability. The results showed that of the nine treatment configurations, the only one that satisfied the safety condition for normal cells (fibroblasts) and the highly cytotoxic condition for tumor cells (HeLa) was the combination of all three triggers. This combination led to the decrease in HeLa viability to about 32%, while the decrease in fibroblast viability reached 80%. It was observed that the cytotoxic effect was not a sum of the separate effects of each trigger involved, but the result of a nonlinear conjugation of the triggers in a dynamic regime imposed by the magneto-mechanical actuation of the nanoparticles. We conclude that by using such a treatment approach, the need for chemotherapeutic drugs can be substantially reduced while maintaining their therapeutic performance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ceramic and Metallic Biomaterials. Application in Medical Sciences)
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9 pages, 4258 KiB  
Article
Tunnel Magnetoresistance-Based Sensor for Biomedical Application: Proof-of-Concept
Coatings 2023, 13(2), 227; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings13020227 - 18 Jan 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1419
Abstract
The aim of this work was to investigate and prove the possibility of the real-time detection of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) distributed in solid material by using a tunnel magnetoresistance-based (TMR) sensor. Following the detection tests of FeCrNbB magnetic nanoparticles distributed in transparent epoxy [...] Read more.
The aim of this work was to investigate and prove the possibility of the real-time detection of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) distributed in solid material by using a tunnel magnetoresistance-based (TMR) sensor. Following the detection tests of FeCrNbB magnetic nanoparticles distributed in transparent epoxy resin (EPON 812) and measuring the sensor output voltage changes at different particle concentrations, the detection ability of the sensor was demonstrated. For the proposed TMR sensor, we measured a maximum magnetoresistance ratio of about 53% and a sensitivity of 1.24%/Oe. This type of sensor could facilitate a new path of research in the field of magnetic hyperthermia by locating cancer cells. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ceramic and Metallic Biomaterials. Application in Medical Sciences)
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13 pages, 4213 KiB  
Article
Synthesis and Characterization of Gold-Shell Magnetic Nanowires for Theranostic Applications
Coatings 2022, 12(11), 1755; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings12111755 - 15 Nov 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1678
Abstract
Increasing interest has been given in recent years to alternative physical therapies for cancer, with a special focus on magneto-mechanical actuation of magnetic nanoparticles. The reported findings underline the need for highly biocompatible nanostructures, along with suitable mechanical and magnetic properties for different [...] Read more.
Increasing interest has been given in recent years to alternative physical therapies for cancer, with a special focus on magneto-mechanical actuation of magnetic nanoparticles. The reported findings underline the need for highly biocompatible nanostructures, along with suitable mechanical and magnetic properties for different configurations of alternating magnetic fields. Here, we show how the biocompatibility of magnetic nanowires (MNWs), especially CoFe, can be increased by gold coating, which can be used both in cancer therapy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This study provides a new approach in the field of theranostic applications, demonstrating the capabilities of core–shell nanowires to be used both to increase the cancer detection limit (as T2 contrast agents) and for its treatment (through magneto-mechanical actuation). The MNWs were electrodeposited in alumina templates, whereas the gold layer was electroless-plated by galvanic replacement. The gold-coated CoFe nanowires were biocompatible until they induced high cellular death to human osteosarcoma cells via magneto-mechanical actuation. These same MNWs displayed increased relaxivities (r1, r2). Our results show that the gold-coated CoFe nanowires turned out to be highly efficient in tumor cell destruction, and, at the same time, suitable for MRI applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ceramic and Metallic Biomaterials. Application in Medical Sciences)
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Review

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17 pages, 9979 KiB  
Review
Effect of 3D-Printed Porous Titanium Alloy Pore Structure on Bone Regeneration: A Review
Coatings 2024, 14(3), 253; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings14030253 - 20 Feb 2024
Viewed by 409
Abstract
As a biomedical material, porous titanium alloy has gained widespread recognition and application within the field of orthopedics. Its remarkable biocompatibility, bioactivity, and mechanical properties establish it as a promising material for facilitating bone regeneration. A well-designed porous structure can lower the material’s [...] Read more.
As a biomedical material, porous titanium alloy has gained widespread recognition and application within the field of orthopedics. Its remarkable biocompatibility, bioactivity, and mechanical properties establish it as a promising material for facilitating bone regeneration. A well-designed porous structure can lower the material’s modulus while retaining ample strength, rendering it more akin to natural bone tissue. The progression of additive manufacturing (AM) technology has significantly propelled the advancement of porous implants, simplifying the production of such structures. AM allows for the customization of porous implants with various shapes and sizes tailored to individual patients. Additionally, it enables the design of microscopic-scale porous structures to closely mimic natural bone, thus opening up avenues for the development of porous titanium alloy bone implants that can better stimulate bone regeneration. This article reviews the research progress on the structural design and preparation methods of porous titanium alloy bone implants, analyzes the porous structure design parameters that affect the performance of the implant, and discusses the application of porous medical titanium alloys. By comparing the effects of the parameters of different porosity, pore shape, and pore size on implant performance, it was concluded that pore diameters in the range of 500~800 μm and porosity in the range of 70%–90% have better bone-regeneration effects. At the same time, when the pore structure is a diamond, rhombohedral, or cube structure, it has better mechanical properties and bone-regeneration effects, providing a reference range for the application of clinical porous implants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ceramic and Metallic Biomaterials. Application in Medical Sciences)
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12 pages, 407 KiB  
Review
Biomaterials in Orthopedic Devices: Current Issues and Future Perspectives
Coatings 2022, 12(10), 1544; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings12101544 - 14 Oct 2022
Cited by 20 | Viewed by 3807
Abstract
In orthopedics, bone fixation imposes the use of implants in almost all cases. Over time, the materials used for the implant have evolved from inert materials to those that mimic the morphology of the bone. Therefore, bioabsorbable, biocompatible, and bioactive materials have emerged. [...] Read more.
In orthopedics, bone fixation imposes the use of implants in almost all cases. Over time, the materials used for the implant have evolved from inert materials to those that mimic the morphology of the bone. Therefore, bioabsorbable, biocompatible, and bioactive materials have emerged. Our study aimed to review the main types of implant materials used in orthopedics and present their advantages and drawbacks. We have searched for the pros and cons of the various types of material in the literature from over the last twenty years. The studied data show that consecrated metal alloys, still widely used, can be successfully replaced by new types of polymers. The data from the literature show that, by manipulating their composition, the polymeric compounds can simulate the structure of the different layers of human bone, while preserving its mechanical characteristics. In addition, manipulation of the polymer composition can provide the initiation of desired cellular responses. Among the implanting materials, polyurethane is distinguished as the most versatile polymeric material for use both as orthopedic implants and as material for biomechanical testing of various bone reduction and fixation techniques. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ceramic and Metallic Biomaterials. Application in Medical Sciences)
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