Advances in Surgery of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

A special issue of Cancers (ISSN 2072-6694). This special issue belongs to the section "Cancer Therapy".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 September 2024 | Viewed by 2826

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Otorhinolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Erasmus MC, 3015 GD Rotterdam, The Netherlands
Interests: head and neck cancer; sinonasal/skullbase tumors; translational research; tumor recurrence and distant metastasis; tumor microenvironment; tumor heterogeneity
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma is a type of cancer that affects the tissues in the head and neck region. It can be a challenging disease to treat, but advances in surgery have made the process much more successful. Over the years, surgeons have developed new techniques and technologies that allow for more precise and effective removal of cancerous cells. This has led to better outcomes for patients and a higher likelihood of long-term survival.

Some of the key advances in surgery for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma include minimally invasive techniques, precision-image-guided surgery, and the use of robots to assist with surgery. These innovations have helped reduce complications, speed up recovery times for patients, and improve adequate resections.

Overall, the field of surgery for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma is rapidly advancing, and patients can expect to benefit from these improvements in the years to come.

In this Special Issue, we aim to collect original research articles and review articles to present and discuss data on surgical advances in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

Dr. José Angelito U. Hardillo
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • head and neck squamous cell carcinoma
  • surgery
  • outcomes
  • minimally invasive techniques
  • precision-image-guided surgery

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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9 pages, 1121 KiB  
Article
A New Proposal for Adequate Resection Margins in Larynx and Hypopharynx Tumor Surgery—Are the RCP Guidelines Feasible?
by Simone E. Bernard, Cornelia G. F. van Lanschot, Jose A. Hardillo, Dominiek A. Monserez, Cees A. Meeuwis, Robert J. Baatenburg de Jong, Senada Koljenović and Aniel Sewnaik
Cancers 2024, 16(11), 2058; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers16112058 - 29 May 2024
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Abstract
Background: Resection margins are an important prognostic factor for patients with head and neck cancer. In general, for head and neck surgery, a margin >5 mm is advised by the Royal College of Pathologists. However, this cannot always be achieved during laryngeal and [...] Read more.
Background: Resection margins are an important prognostic factor for patients with head and neck cancer. In general, for head and neck surgery, a margin >5 mm is advised by the Royal College of Pathologists. However, this cannot always be achieved during laryngeal and hypopharyngeal surgery. The aim of this study is to identify the resection surfaces and measure the maximum feasible margins per subsite. The clinical relevance of these maximum feasible resection margins were analyzed in this descriptive anatomical study. Methods: head and neck surgeons and a pathologist from the Erasmus MC performed a total laryngectomy and laryngopharyngectomy on a head and neck specimen specifically available for research. Results: For a total laryngectomy, resection margins >5 mm were not feasible for the ventral and dorsal resection surface. For a total laryngopharyngectomy, resection margins >5 mm were not feasible for the ventral, dorsal and lateral resection surface. Conclusion: Clear resection margins, defined as a margin >5 mm, are not always feasible in laryngeal and hypopharyngeal surgery, due to the anatomy of the larynx and tumor location. However, striving for a maximum feasible margin is still the main goal. We propose a new guideline for maximum feasible but adequate resection margins in larynx and hypopharynx tumor surgery. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Surgery of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma)
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16 pages, 237 KiB  
Article
Predictors for Success and Failure in Transoral Robotic Surgery—A Retrospective Study in the North of the Netherlands
by Alexandra G. L. Toppenberg, Thomas S. Nijboer, Wisse G. W. J. van der Laan, Jan Wedman, Leonora Q. Schwandt, Robert E. Plaat, Max J. H. Witjes, Inge Wegner and Gyorgy B. Halmos
Cancers 2024, 16(8), 1458; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers16081458 - 11 Apr 2024
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Abstract
Transoral Robotic Surgery (TORS) is utilized for treating various malignancies, such as early-stage oropharyngeal cancer and lymph node metastasis of an unknown primary tumor (CUP), and also benign conditions, like obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and chronic lingual tonsillitis. However, the success and failure [...] Read more.
Transoral Robotic Surgery (TORS) is utilized for treating various malignancies, such as early-stage oropharyngeal cancer and lymph node metastasis of an unknown primary tumor (CUP), and also benign conditions, like obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and chronic lingual tonsillitis. However, the success and failure of TORS have not been analyzed to date. In this retrospective observational multicenter cohort study, we evaluated patients treated with TORS using the da Vinci surgical system. Success criteria were defined as identification of the primary tumor for CUP, >2 mm resection margin for malignant conditions, and improvement on respiratory polygraphy and tonsillitis complaints for benign conditions. A total of 220 interventions in 211 patients were included. We identified predictors of success, such as low comorbidity status ACE-27, positive P16 status, and lower age for CUP, and female gender and OSA severity for benign conditions. For other malignancies, no predictors for success were found. Predictors of failure based on postoperative complications included high comorbidity scores (ASA) and anticoagulant use, and for postoperative pain, younger age and female gender were identified. This study provides valuable insights into the outcomes and predictors of success and failure in TORS procedures across various conditions and may also help in patient selection and counseling. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Surgery of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma)
17 pages, 7495 KiB  
Article
Mixed Reality as a Digital Visualisation Solution for the Head and Neck Tumour Board: Application Creation and Implementation Study
by Nadia Karnatz, Michael Schwerter, Shufang Liu, Aida Parviz, Max Wilkat and Majeed Rana
Cancers 2024, 16(7), 1392; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers16071392 - 31 Mar 2024
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Abstract
The preparation and implementation of interdisciplinary oncological case reviews are time-consuming and complex. The variety of clinical and radiological information must be presented in a clear and comprehensible manner. Only if all relevant patient-specific information is demonstrated in a short time frame can [...] Read more.
The preparation and implementation of interdisciplinary oncological case reviews are time-consuming and complex. The variety of clinical and radiological information must be presented in a clear and comprehensible manner. Only if all relevant patient-specific information is demonstrated in a short time frame can well-founded treatment decisions be made on this basis. Mixed reality (MR) technology as a multimodal interactive user interface could enhance understanding in multidisciplinary collaboration by visualising radiological or clinical data. The aim of the work was to develop an MR-based software prototype for a head and neck tumour board (HNTB) to support clinical decision-making. The article describes the development phases and workflows in the planning and creation of a MR-based software prototype that were required to meet the multidisciplinary characteristics of a HNTB. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Surgery of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma)
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17 pages, 2723 KiB  
Systematic Review
Reconstruction of Partial Hypopharyngeal Defects following Total Laryngectomy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
by Anthony M. Tonsbeek, Roxy Leidelmeijer, Caroline A. Hundepool, Liron S. Duraku, Mark J. W. Van der Oest, Aniel Sewnaik and Marc A. M. Mureau
Cancers 2024, 16(10), 1804; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers16101804 - 8 May 2024
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Abstract
Background: Various operative techniques exist to reconstruct partial hypopharyngeal defects following total laryngectomy. The current study aimed to investigate and compare complications and functional results following commonly used reconstructive techniques. Methods: A systematic review and meta-analysis were performed using studies that investigated outcomes [...] Read more.
Background: Various operative techniques exist to reconstruct partial hypopharyngeal defects following total laryngectomy. The current study aimed to investigate and compare complications and functional results following commonly used reconstructive techniques. Methods: A systematic review and meta-analysis were performed using studies that investigated outcomes after the reconstruction of a partial hypopharyngeal defect. The outcomes of interest were fistulas, strictures, flap failure, swallowing function and postoperative speech. Results: Of the 4035 studies identified, 23 were included in this review. Four common reconstructive techniques were reported, with a total of 794 patients: (1) pectoralis major myocutaneous and (2) myofascial flap, (3) anterolateral thigh free flap and (4) radial forearm free flap. Fistulas occurred significantly more often than pectoralis major myocutaneous flaps (34%, 95% CI 23–47%) compared with other flaps (p < 0.001). No significant differences in the rates of strictures or flap failure were observed. Pectoralis major myofascial flaps were non-inferior to free-flap reconstructions. Insufficient data were available to assess speech results between flap types. Conclusion: Pectoralis myocutaneous flaps should not be the preferred method of reconstruction for most patients, considering their significantly higher rate of fistulas. In contrast, pectoralis major myofascial flaps yield promising results compared to free-flap reconstructions, warranting further investigation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Surgery of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma)
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