State-of-the-Art Research on Multiple Myeloma Progression

A special issue of Cancers (ISSN 2072-6694). This special issue belongs to the section "Cancer Immunology and Immunotherapy".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2024 | Viewed by 994

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Levine Cancer Institute, Charlotte, NC 28204, USA
Interests: plasma cell disorders; multiple myeloma; amyloidosis; plasma cell leukemia; CAR-T
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Multiple myeloma is a type of blood cancer that occurs when malignant plasma cells accumulate in the bone marrow. In recent years, science has made significant progress in understanding the molecular pathways involved in myeloma development and developing new drugs to treat the disease.

One crucial area of research has been the identification of genetic mutations and alterations that contribute to the development of myeloma. In addition, by studying the genomic landscape of myeloma, researchers have discovered new targets for drug development, such as inhibitors of the oncogene MYC, MDM2, IRF4, PERK, and others.

Another area of focus has been the development of immunotherapies, which harness the immune system's power to fight cancer. One promising approach has been the use of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cells or chimeric NK-cells therapy, which involves genetically engineering a donor's or patient's immune cells to recognize and attack myeloma cells and off-the-shelf bispecific T-cell engagers against multiple targets such as BCMA, GPRC5D, FcRH5, the cluster of differentiation (CD)1d and CD47, among others. In addition, the T-cell engager's underdevelopment could target multiple targets simultaneously.

Bench-to-bedside development is a vital process that enables the development of new therapies for myeloma, leading to improved patient outcomes and survival. The current state-of-the-art therapies in myeloma include immunomodulatory drugs, proteasome inhibitors, monoclonal antibodies, T-cell engagers, CAR-T cell therapies, and XPO-1 inhibitors.

The recent advances in myeloma research and drug development offer hope for improved outcomes for patients with this challenging disease.

Dr. Shebli Atrash
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • multiple myeloma
  • novel targets
  • novel therapies
  • molecular therapy
  • immunotherapy

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

13 pages, 542 KiB  
Review
Immune Therapies in AL Amyloidosis—A Glimpse to the Future
by Arnon Haran, Iuliana Vaxman, Moshe E. Gatt and Eyal Lebel
Cancers 2024, 16(8), 1605; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers16081605 - 22 Apr 2024
Viewed by 647
Abstract
Light-chain (AL) amyloidosis is a rare plasma cell disorder characterized by the deposition of misfolded immunoglobulin light chains in target organs, leading to multi-organ dysfunction. Treatment approaches have historically mirrored but lagged behind those of multiple myeloma (MM). Recent advancements in MM immunotherapy [...] Read more.
Light-chain (AL) amyloidosis is a rare plasma cell disorder characterized by the deposition of misfolded immunoglobulin light chains in target organs, leading to multi-organ dysfunction. Treatment approaches have historically mirrored but lagged behind those of multiple myeloma (MM). Recent advancements in MM immunotherapy are gradually being evaluated and adopted in AL amyloidosis. This review explores the current state of immunotherapeutic strategies in AL amyloidosis, including monoclonal antibodies, antibody–drug conjugates, bispecific antibodies, and chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy. We discuss the unique challenges and prospects of these therapies in AL amyloidosis, including the exposure of frail AL amyloidosis patients to immune-mediated toxicities such as cytokine release syndrome (CRS) and immune effector-cell-associated neurotoxicity syndrome (ICANS), as well as their efficacy in promoting rapid and deep hematologic responses. Furthermore, we highlight the need for international initiatives and compassionate programs to provide access to these promising therapies and address critical unmet needs in AL amyloidosis management. Finally, we discuss future directions, including optimizing treatment sequencing and mitigating toxicities, to improve outcomes for AL amyloidosis patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue State-of-the-Art Research on Multiple Myeloma Progression)
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