Sensing the Built Environment: Measurements, Correlations, and Implications

A special issue of Buildings (ISSN 2075-5309). This special issue belongs to the section "Building Energy, Physics, Environment, and Systems".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2024 | Viewed by 3497

Special Issue Editors

1. School of Public Administration, Hunan University, Changsha 410082, China
2. Department of Urban Planning and Design, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong 999077, China
Interests: environmental vulnerability; urban analytics; behavioral economics; mobility; spatial optimization
Department of Urban Planning, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350116, China
Interests: urban environment and public health; application of GIS and big data
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The emergence of new data and the machine learning approach provide great opportunities to generate theoretical and empirical insights for built environment research. On the one hand, they promote high-quality measurements of the built environment, which are usually much more refined, comprehensive, and with high spatiotemporal resolutions of the data. On the other hand, the new data and methods advance a more systematic and in-depth understanding of the interaction between the built environment, psychological perception (e.g., safety, lively, beauty), and well-being (e.g., human emotion, physical health, mental health). Accordingly, it is hoped that the Special Issue on Sensing the Built Environment: Measurements, Correlations, and Implications, can advance an interdisciplinary dialogue between architecture, urban planning, social science, and computer science. The Special Issue not only invites manuscripts on literature reviews, but also theoretical, methodological, and empirical work. The topics may include, but are not limited to, the following areas:

(1) Measuring the built environment with new data and sensing technologies (e.g., street view images, wearable device);
(2) Understanding the complex interactions between the built environment, psychological perception (e.g., safety, lively), and well-being (e.g., emotion);
(3) Implications for urban planning and policy intervention (e.g., pathways, optimization).

Dr. Chang Xia
Dr. Huagui Guo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Buildings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • built environment
  • human perception
  • well-being
  • measurements
  • correlations
  • implications
  • interdisciplinary research

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

16 pages, 4926 KiB  
Article
Architectonic Design Supported by Visual Environmental Simulation—A Comparison of Displays and Formats
by Juan Luis Higuera-Trujillo, Juan López-Tarruella Maldonado, Nuria Castilla and Carmen Llinares
Buildings 2024, 14(1), 216; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings14010216 - 13 Jan 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 757
Abstract
Visual environmental simulations are fundamental in understanding the relationship between the built environment and psychological perception. The remarkable evolution of virtual immersion displays over recent years has provided a series of advantages to the architectural discipline, one of which is that non-specialists now [...] Read more.
Visual environmental simulations are fundamental in understanding the relationship between the built environment and psychological perception. The remarkable evolution of virtual immersion displays over recent years has provided a series of advantages to the architectural discipline, one of which is that non-specialists now have the potential to better understand architectural spaces. This work aimed to analyse the adequacy of the main displays and formats currently used in environmental simulations. As the objective was twofold, two experimental studies were carried out (with a sample of 100 participants). The studies evaluated users’ responses to different environmental representations of two environments, using differential semantic scales to measure key underlying factors (utility, credibility, realism, accuracy, abstraction). The first study examined simulation displays: a PC, an HTC Vive Pro 2 head-mounted display, a PowerWall Screen and a CAVE. In the second, formats were analysed: normal image, 360° image, video and 360° video. The results of this work revealed that users perceived the space differently depending on the representation displays and formats used. Such comparisons of these new means of representing architectural spaces can be helpful to researchers, architects and urban planning professionals and might provoke debate in, and be extrapolated into, the design field. Full article
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19 pages, 13426 KiB  
Article
Reflective Façades: Revisiting a Neglected Trait of Modernism in Contemporary Architecture with New Implications and Significance
by Zeinab Ahmed Abd ElGhaffar Elmoghazy and Hazem M. Nour Afify
Buildings 2023, 13(11), 2740; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings13112740 - 30 Oct 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 923
Abstract
Reflection and transparency are two valuable properties associated with the use of glass as an architectural material. While proponents of modernism favored transparency over reflection, whether in its physical or conceptual implications, to justify the designs of façades of Modernist buildings and in [...] Read more.
Reflection and transparency are two valuable properties associated with the use of glass as an architectural material. While proponents of modernism favored transparency over reflection, whether in its physical or conceptual implications, to justify the designs of façades of Modernist buildings and in architectural criticism, contemporary architects are revisiting the neglected trait of ‘reflection’. Taking advantage of the technological advances in glass and other materials that have taken reflection to new limits, they are able to design reflective façades, providing new implications and significance. This paper aims to fill the theoretical gap that arises from the different conceptual ideas of using reflective façades. It will also explore the implications intended by architects to be perceived by viewers, thereby facilitating the future use of these façades in a way that satisfies architects and attracts beholders. The research methodology employed thematic analysis of various experiences of the use of reflective façades in different buildings with diverse functions and locations. The vocabulary used by architects and their intended implications were analyzed, coded, and categorized under three main themes: ‘Aesthetics of Disappearance’, ‘Games of Optical Illusions’, and ‘Mystery and Arousing Curiosity’. Full article
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25 pages, 3628 KiB  
Article
A User’s Perspective on the Factors Influencing the Satisfaction of Assistive Technology Resources Centers’ Built Environment Services
by Tsen-Yao Chang and Shao-Wei Huang
Buildings 2023, 13(6), 1449; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings13061449 - 1 Jun 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1124
Abstract
Taiwan will move into a super-aged society by 2025. The government is actively establishing assistive technology resources centers (ATR Centers) throughout Taiwan to provide assistive technology services such as display, evaluation, rental, and maintenance services; they also recycle unused assistive devices, disinfect and [...] Read more.
Taiwan will move into a super-aged society by 2025. The government is actively establishing assistive technology resources centers (ATR Centers) throughout Taiwan to provide assistive technology services such as display, evaluation, rental, and maintenance services; they also recycle unused assistive devices, disinfect and clean them, and then rent them to people in need to achieve sustainable development. This study investigates the users’ perceptions about receiving services from the ATR Center in Yunlin and explores their satisfaction. “Service convenience”, “service quality”, “user experience” and “corporate social responsibility (CSR)” were used as the overall research framework and hypotheses are based on the mediating role of “CSR”; data are collected through questionnaires, and structural equation modeling (SEM) is used to test the model and hypotheses. A total of 532 valid questionnaires were collected from the users and caregivers who had used the services of the center in the past two years. The statistical analysis was conducted in three stages: sample data analysis, measurement model validation, and structural equation model analysis. According to the research findings, service convenience, service quality, and user experience all have a significant positive impact on CSR. Additionally, service convenience, service quality, user experience, and CSR have a positive impact on user satisfaction. Moreover, service quality and user experience indirectly affect user satisfaction through CSR. Finally, based on the research results, suggestions are proposed for addressing issues related to assistive service promotion and future adjustments. Full article
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