High-Performance Concrete for Structural Disaster Prevention

A special issue of Buildings (ISSN 2075-5309). This special issue belongs to the section "Building Structures".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2023) | Viewed by 4819

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Interdisciplinary Research Center for Construction and Building Materials, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261, Saudi Arabia
Interests: concrete & masonry structures; composite materials; RC strengthening

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Guest Editor
Associate Professor, Civil Engineering Department, College of Engineering, Jazan University, Jazan 82817, Saudi Arabia
Interests: concrete technology; concrete structures; high-strength concrete; ultra-high-strength concrete

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Many modern life activities involve the risk of fires, explosions, and impacts. In addition, natural extreme events are becoming increasingly common. Thus, robustness (the ability to avoid disproportionate collapse due to an initial damage) and resilience (the ability to adapt to and recover from the effects of changing external conditions) represent two important characteristics of current structures and infrastructures. High-performance concrete offers significant advantages, including reducing the weight of large structures and protecting them against natural disasters and accidental impacts. These advantages contribute to the robustness, resilience and durability of the structures. The continued development of building materials and/or cement-based composites is particularly important in areas where frequent natural disasters threaten the integrity of structures.

In this Special Issue, we invite original contributions describing new research, case studies, projects, reviews and state-of-the-art discussions related to the prevention of structures from natural disasters and accidental impacts via the innovation of “high-performance concrete”. Submissions may concern theoretical or applied research in areas such as buildings, bridges, concrete technology, engineering, advanced concrete, cement-based composites and their structural applications, or other fields applied to the retrofitting and strengthening of existing structures or the construction of robust and durable structures.

We welcome papers on topics including but not limited to the following:

  • High-performance concrete (HPC);
  • Ultra-high-performance concrete (UHPC);
  • Sustainable construction materials;
  • Self-compacting concrete (SCC);
  • Self-healing concrete (SHC);
  • Ultra-lightweight concrete (ULWC);
  • Engineered cementitious composites (ECC);
  • Highly durable concrete;
  • High-strength-high-ductility concrete;
  • Structural disaster prevention approaches;
  • Structural health monitoring (SHM);
  • Robust and resilient structures;
  • Finite element analysis of HPC structures;
  • 3D printing using high-performance concrete.

Dr. Amin Al-Fakih
Dr. Abdullah M. Zeyad
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Buildings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • high-performance concrete
  • engineered cementitious composites
  • high-strength-high-ductility concrete
  • extreme loading (blast and impacts)
  • fire resistance
  • natural disaster
  • durability
  • robustness and resilience
  • finite element analysis
  • service life

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

23 pages, 1048 KiB  
Article
A TRIZ-Supported Concept and Protocol Development for Roof Tile Transportation and Inspection Systems
by Zhi Yuan Phuah, Poh Kiat Ng, Murman Dwi Prasetio, Kia Wai Liew, Boon Kian Lim, Ayudita Oktafiani, Sheila Amalia Salma and Yunita Nugrahaini Safrudin
Buildings 2023, 13(1), 197; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings13010197 - 11 Jan 2023
Viewed by 1834
Abstract
Currently, the use of manual labour in the transportation and inspection systems of leading roof tile manufacturing companies in Indonesia is still prevalent. Manual labour is usually labour-intensive, has higher risks of musculoskeletal disorders, and produces frequent occurrences of errors and losses. Furthermore, [...] Read more.
Currently, the use of manual labour in the transportation and inspection systems of leading roof tile manufacturing companies in Indonesia is still prevalent. Manual labour is usually labour-intensive, has higher risks of musculoskeletal disorders, and produces frequent occurrences of errors and losses. Furthermore, the current studies of suitable concepts and test protocols for roof tile transportation at the manufacturing stage as well as their inspection systems are not practicable in Indonesia. There is also no study that has used the theory of inventive problem-solving (TRIZ) in the development of concepts and protocols for roof tile transportation and inspection systems. Using TRIZ as a supporting tool, this study investigated the development of a transportation system to be employed during the manufacturing of the roof tile and a test protocol for their usability in Indonesian companies to overcome this concern. The study included screening and scoring concepts and usability test protocols identified from the existing literature, with the support of TRIZ tools such as the engineering contradiction, contradiction matrix, and inventive principles. Thus, the finalised concept comprised a belt conveyor system (Inventive Principle 20: Continuity of Useful Action) with a flipping mechanism for transportation and a vision-based camera for inspection. Results of the study showed that the concept excelled in cost, durability, reliability, versatility, low risk to the product, efficiency, and safety. The t-test protocol (Inventive Principle 23: Feedback) was selected based on the results due to its versatility in testing efficiency, reliability, and productivity. It was concluded that this concept has the potential to alleviate roof tile workers of physical work and reduce the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue High-Performance Concrete for Structural Disaster Prevention)
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13 pages, 4772 KiB  
Article
Mechanical and Microstructural Properties of Ultra-High Performance Concrete with Lightweight Aggregates
by Hani Alanazi, Oussama Elalaoui, Musa Adamu, Saleh O. Alaswad, Yasser E. Ibrahim, Aref A. Abadel and Abdulrahman Fahad Al Fuhaid
Buildings 2022, 12(11), 1783; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings12111783 - 24 Oct 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1893
Abstract
Although ultra-high-performance concrete (UHPC) presents superior mechanical properties and durability compared to conventional concrete; its spalling resistance to elevated temperatures is much lower compared to conventional concrete due to the high compactness and absence of capillary pores. This paper investigated the influence of [...] Read more.
Although ultra-high-performance concrete (UHPC) presents superior mechanical properties and durability compared to conventional concrete; its spalling resistance to elevated temperatures is much lower compared to conventional concrete due to the high compactness and absence of capillary pores. This paper investigated the influence of lightweight aggregate (LWA) on the strength properties and microstructure of UHPC to enhance its resistance to elevated temperatures. UHPC specimens prepared with LWA as a partial replacement of silica sand were produced. The study evaluated the compressive and flexural strengths, failure mode, mass loss, and microstructure of the specimens, using SEM. The results showed that the compressive strength of the UHPC specimen was reduced with increasing the content of LWA at ambient temperature, but the compressive strength of the UHPC specimens prepared with LWA improved when exposed to elevated temperatures. The replacement of 10% of the silica sand with LWA led to an increase in the compressive strength from 100 MPa to 110 MPa after exposure to 200 °C; however, the flexural strength decreased from 23.6 MPa to 18.3 MPa. On the contrary, the flexural strength of UHPC increased with the inclusion of LWA at an ambient temperature but reduced with high-temperature exposure. The failure mode of UHPC was not significantly affected by the variation in LWA content and temperature. In addition, the SEM result confirms that LWA is an effective internal curing material for enhancing the microstructure and compressive strength of UHPC Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue High-Performance Concrete for Structural Disaster Prevention)
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