Green Lime Technologies in Construction Materials

A special issue of Buildings (ISSN 2075-5309). This special issue belongs to the section "Building Materials, and Repair & Renovation".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2024 | Viewed by 7868

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Institute of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics of the Czech Academy of Sciences, 588 56 Telč, Czech Republic
Interests: conservation and restoration of cultural heritage; building materials; materials engineering; damage mechanisms

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Guest Editor
Institute of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics of the Czech Academy of Sciences, 588 56 Telč, Czech Republic
Interests: resilience of historic building porous materials (stone and mortar) against expected environmental influences, focused on development of methods for simulation and assessment of degradation processes. Research into characteristics of new repair materials
Institute of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics of the Czech Academy of Sciences, 588 56 Telč, Czech Republic
Interests: material characteristics; mechanical properties; materials testing

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Guest Editor
Department of Civil Engineering, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 1099-085 Lisbon, Portugal
Interests: earth construction; mortar; Building; eco-efficient building material; building pathology; building rehabilitation
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Green and sustainable construction is of the utmost importance for achieving a cleaner environment in the future. Lime as a building material offers numerous ecological benefits, and can be used both in retrofitting and new construction projects. It can be seen as an environmentally friendly material that is safe for building operators and users, in addition to requiring low energy input to produce . Lime-based materials can also be upgraded to improve their green credentials, especially in relation to durability and energy efficiency. Lime is a traditional building material with a long history, which brings a great deal of knowledge about its manufacturing and use. The urgently needed CO2 abetment requires a rethinking of traditional approaches to maintaining continuity where necessary, as in the building conservation sector, while providing modern solutions for contemporary architecture. This Special Issue welcomes research on construction materials based on lime from production to application technologies in a green and sustainable way.

Dr. Cristiana Nunes
Dr. Zuzana Slížková
Dr. Jan Valek
Dr. Paulina Faria
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Buildings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • lime binder
  • durability
  • additives
  • residues
  • energy-efficiency
  • user-friendly
  • repair of historic buildings
  • life cycle assessment
  • traditional technologies
  • carbonation
  • natural hydraulic lime

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

11 pages, 4365 KiB  
Article
Consolidating Efficiency of Nanolime Product CaLoSiL on Porous Limestone
by Zuzana Slížková, Dita Frankeová and Miloš Drdácký
Buildings 2023, 13(1), 209; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings13010209 - 12 Jan 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1293
Abstract
The effects of the double and the multiple application (2 to 6) of Calosil® (IBZ-Salzchemie GmbH, Halsbruecke, Germany) E25, IP 25 and E50 products were studied on Maastricht limestone, which is characterized by high porosity and large pores. Both destructive and non-destructive [...] Read more.
The effects of the double and the multiple application (2 to 6) of Calosil® (IBZ-Salzchemie GmbH, Halsbruecke, Germany) E25, IP 25 and E50 products were studied on Maastricht limestone, which is characterized by high porosity and large pores. Both destructive and non-destructive laboratory tests we performed in order to assess the consolidating efficiency of the nanolimes—the bending and compressive strengths, ultrasound velocity measurement, porosity determination and SEM examination. Except for the compressive strength, the other characteristics were investigated in the depth profile of stone specimens to find the distribution of the treatment product within the substrate. The performed tests showed good penetration of CaLoSiL nanolime products into the studied limestone. The bending strengths of limestone samples after double treatment using nanolime E 25, IP25 and E 50 were found to be increased by 50%, 44% and 89%, respectively, whereas the compressive strength increased by 50%, 23% and 73%. The porosity of the stone was reduced by the treatment, but only slightly, to an acceptable extent. The higher sum of performed nanolime applications resulted in a higher strengthening effect but at the same time at the uneven distribution of the product in the stone specimen, which was followed by an increase in the strength and decrease of open porosity in the surface part. SEM examination showed a modification of the stone microstructure by the added binder. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green Lime Technologies in Construction Materials)
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16 pages, 5225 KiB  
Article
Limewashes with Linseed Oil and Its Effect on Water and Salt Transport
by Cristiana Lara Nunes, Kateřina Mlsnová and Zuzana Slížková
Buildings 2022, 12(4), 402; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings12040402 - 25 Mar 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 5671
Abstract
Paints are the protective and aesthetic skin of buildings, so (re) painting is one of the most recurrent maintenance actions. Limewashes have been used since antiquity and are currently of high interest for both conservation and new construction, majorly thanks to their eco-friendly [...] Read more.
Paints are the protective and aesthetic skin of buildings, so (re) painting is one of the most recurrent maintenance actions. Limewashes have been used since antiquity and are currently of high interest for both conservation and new construction, majorly thanks to their eco-friendly and antiseptic features, and ability to improve the performance of the materials in relation to water transport. Linseed oil is a traditional water-repellent additive that can enhance the water-shedding properties of the limewashes. However, it has the risk of altering the drying kinetics of the substrate if an improper dosage is used. In this work, limewashes with the addition of varying dosages of linseed oil have been applied on two types of natural stone to study the effect of the paints in respect to water and salt transport. The water absorption by capillarity was reduced in both stones coated with pure limewash and limewash with oil, while the drying rate was slightly accelerated. The effect of the paints on the drying of the salt-laden stones varied. The salt damage developed during drying also diverged in both stones, damaging the coats and stone surface of the less porous stone and mainly promoting salt efflorescence in the most porous one. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green Lime Technologies in Construction Materials)
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