Building Foundation Analysis: Soil–Structure Interaction

A special issue of Buildings (ISSN 2075-5309). This special issue belongs to the section "Building Structures".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2024 | Viewed by 2180

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
School of Civil Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044, China
Interests: rock mechanics; soil mechanics; disaster prevention and reduction; underground space; soil–structure interaction
School of Civil Engineering and Architecture, Chongqing University of Science and Technology, Chongqing 401331, China
Interests: geotechnical engineering; rock and soil mechanics

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
College of River and Ocean Engineering, Chongqing Jiaotong University, Chongqing 400074, China
Interests: tunneling; rock slope stability; numerical modelling; rock mass characterization

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In this Special Issue of Buildings, we will delve into a critical topic in building foundations: soil–structure interaction. The characteristics of soil and its interaction with structural elements play a vital role in the design and construction of buildings. This Special Issue aims to provide readers with insights into the latest research findings, engineering practices, and technological innovations in the field of soil–structure interaction.

The topics of interest include but are not limited to the following:

  1. Fundamental principles and theories of soil mechanics.
  2. Design and analysis methods for building foundations.
  3. Models and numerical simulations of soil–structure interaction.
  4. Influence of different soil types on building behavior.
  5. Analysis of soil bearing capacity, settlement, and deformation.
  6. Dynamic response and seismic engineering of soil–structure systems.
  7. Design, analysis, and construction techniques for pile foundations.
  8. Application of soil improvement techniques in soil–structure interaction.
  9. Effects of soil lateral forces on buildings and mitigation methods.
  10. Research on soil-structure interaction in underground structures.

Prof. Dr. Qiang Xie
Dr. Yuxin Ban
Dr. Xiang Fu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Buildings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • building foundations
  • soil mechanics
  • soil–structure interaction
  • building behavior
  • pile foundations

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

22 pages, 3386 KiB  
Article
Nonlinear Dynamic Response of Galfenol Cantilever Energy Harvester Considering Geometric Nonlinear with a Nonlinear Energy Sink
by Lingzhi Wang, Chao Liu, Weidong Liu, Zhitao Yan and Xiaochun Nie
Buildings 2024, 14(5), 1482; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings14051482 - 20 May 2024
Viewed by 327
Abstract
The nonlinear energy sink (NES) and Galfenol material can achieve vibration suppression and energy harvesting of the structure, respectively. Compared with a linear structure, the geometric nonlinearity can affect the output performances of the cantilever beam structure. This investigation aims to present a [...] Read more.
The nonlinear energy sink (NES) and Galfenol material can achieve vibration suppression and energy harvesting of the structure, respectively. Compared with a linear structure, the geometric nonlinearity can affect the output performances of the cantilever beam structure. This investigation aims to present a coupled system consisting of a nonlinear energy sink (NES) and a cantilever Galfenol energy harvesting beam with geometric nonlinearity. Based on Hamilton’s principle, linear constitutive equations of magnetostrictive material, and Faraday’s law of electromagnetic induction, the theoretical dynamic model of the coupled system is proposed. Utilizing the Galliakin decomposition method and Runge–Kutta method, the harvested power of the external load resistance, and tip vibration displacements of the Galfenol energy harvesting model are analyzed. The influences of the external excitation, external resistance, and NES parameters on the output characteristic of the proposed coupling system have been investigated. Results reveal that introducing NES can reduce the cantilever beam’s vibration while considering the geometric nonlinearity of the cantilever beam can induce a nonlinear softening phenomenon for the output behaviors. Compared to the linear system without NES, the coupling model proposed in this work can achieve dual efficacy goals over a wide range of excitation frequencies when selecting appropriate parameters. In general, large excitation amplitude and NES stiffness, small external resistance, and small or large NES damping values can achieve the effect of broadband energy harvesting. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Building Foundation Analysis: Soil–Structure Interaction)
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13 pages, 5799 KiB  
Article
Experimental Study on the Mechanical Properties of Rock–Concrete Composite Specimens under Cyclic Loading
by Hongjun Li, Baoyun Zhao, Zhengjun Hou and Hongyao Min
Buildings 2024, 14(3), 854; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings14030854 - 21 Mar 2024
Viewed by 523
Abstract
The foundations of bridges and other tall buildings are often subjected to cyclic loads. Therefore, it is essential to investigate the mechanical properties of rock–concrete composite foundations under cyclic loads. In this paper, uniaxial cyclic loading and unloading tests were conducted on rock–concrete [...] Read more.
The foundations of bridges and other tall buildings are often subjected to cyclic loads. Therefore, it is essential to investigate the mechanical properties of rock–concrete composite foundations under cyclic loads. In this paper, uniaxial cyclic loading and unloading tests were conducted on rock–concrete composite specimens using the TFD-2000 microcomputer servo-controlled rock triaxial testing machine. The stress–strain curves, elastic modulus variation, and energy dissipation were analyzed. The results showed that the stress–strain curves of composite specimens under uniaxial cyclic loading and unloading conditions formed hysteresis loops. The hysteresis loop exhibited a sparse–dense–sparse pattern under the upper stress of 27.44 MPa, which was 90% of the uniaxial strength. The elastic modulus, as well as the dissipated energy, decreased rapidly in the first few cycles and then gradually decreased at a constant rate, with the upper stress increasing to 27.44 MPa. Both the elastic modulus and the dissipated energy exhibited an accelerated stage before specimen failure. The primary failure mode of the composite specimen was split failure from concrete to sandstone. A damage variable was derived to better reflect the laws governing the damage evolution of the composite under cyclic loads. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Building Foundation Analysis: Soil–Structure Interaction)
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21 pages, 16028 KiB  
Article
Theoretical Analysis of the Influence of Bearing Plate Position on the Bearing Performance of Soil around the CEP Antipull Force Double Pile
by Yongmei Qian, Lin Sun, Lishuang Ai, Ying Zhou and Mingxiao Li
Buildings 2023, 13(10), 2613; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings13102613 - 17 Oct 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 856
Abstract
With the development of large-scale projects such as high-rise buildings, deep-sea platforms, bridges, etc., these construction facilities are affected by many factors such as environment and geological conditions, which put forward higher requirements for pile-bearing capacity. Compared with the straight-hole grouted piles, the [...] Read more.
With the development of large-scale projects such as high-rise buildings, deep-sea platforms, bridges, etc., these construction facilities are affected by many factors such as environment and geological conditions, which put forward higher requirements for pile-bearing capacity. Compared with the straight-hole grouted piles, the CEP (concrete expanded-plate) piles have an increased bearing plate, which has stronger resistance to pullout under the action of axial tension. The location of the bearing plate is the main factor affecting the bearing capacity of a CEP pile. This study simulates and analyzes CEP double piles on ANSYS software (Ansys R19.0 versions) under ideal conditions, designs five types of model piles with different bearing plate positions, and divides them into six groups for simulation. Finally, a complete model of the two-pile system is established. It is obtained that when the bearing plate is in the same position, the longer the pile length above the bearing plate, the greater the ultimate bearing capacity of the CEP double piles; when the bearing plates of a double pile are at different positions, the antipull-force-bearing capacity of the double pile mainly depends on the pile with a smaller pile length above the bearing plate, and determines the calculation mode of a CEP double-pile antipull-force-bearing capacity at different bearing plate positions, so as to provide a theoretical basis for the design and application of CEP pile foundations in large building structures in the future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Building Foundation Analysis: Soil–Structure Interaction)
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