Innovative Solutions, New Technologies, and Reinforced Concrete Strengthening Applications for Sustainable Infrastructure and Buildings

A special issue of Buildings (ISSN 2075-5309).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2024 | Viewed by 2322

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Civil Engineering, Konya Technical University, Konya 42075, Turkey
Interests: composite materials; sustainability; reinforced concrete structures; steel structures; FRP; pultruded materials; strengthening; earthquake

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Guest Editor
Department of Civil Engineering, Necmettin Erbakan University, Konya 42100, Turkey
Interests: composite materials; sustainability; concrete structures; steel structures; FRP; pultruded materials
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Civil Engineering, Necmettin Erbakan University, Konya 42100, Turkey
Interests: mechanics of composites; nano materials; solid mechanics; advanced composites; FRP

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue aims to increase our knowledge of sustainable design practices, exploring new construction solutions with techniques and materials that contribute to overcoming the challenges facing civil engineering. As designers, we must assume the responsibility to build and rehabilitate by optimizing resources and materials in all life-cycle phases, to ensure a balance between economic growth, environmental protection and social welfare. These objectives include, among others, the following:

  • Building rehabilitation and service life extension of infrastructure;
  • Design of tall buildings;
  • Design optimization based on sustainable indicators;
  • Inclusion of social impacts in the design of buildings and infrastructures;
  • Life-cycle-oriented building and infrastructure design;
  • Modern methods of construction;
  • New strengthening techniques for buildings;
  • Sustainable design and management of structures;
  • The use of sustainable construction materials.

Papers selected for this Special Issue will be subject to a rigorous peer-review process, with the aim of ensuring the rapid and wide dissemination of research results, developments, and applications.

Dr. Ceyhun Aksoylu
Dr. Yasin Onuralp Özkılıç
Dr. Emrah Madenci
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Buildings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • new strengthening techniques
  • earthquake-resistant building design
  • sustainable design and construction
  • innovative construction
  • construction technologies
  • sustainable construction materials
  • sustainability in decision making
  • green buildings
  • circular economy
  • rehabilitation

  • construction and demolition waste
  • resilient structures

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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19 pages, 2272 KiB  
Article
Behavior of Confined Self-Compacting Concrete under Compression at Elevated Temperatures
by Athiq Ulla Khan, Nanjundaswamy Sateesh Kumar, Alireza Bahrami, Yasin Onuralp Özkılıç, Mohammed Imran, Essam Althaqafi and Saiful Islam
Buildings 2023, 13(12), 3115; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings13123115 - 15 Dec 2023
Viewed by 660
Abstract
The performance of self-compacting concrete (SCC) is gaining popularity in construction due to its exceptional strength and durability. However, the properties of combined steel and concrete at elevated temperatures lack experimental data from previous research. This study aimed to investigate the behavior of [...] Read more.
The performance of self-compacting concrete (SCC) is gaining popularity in construction due to its exceptional strength and durability. However, the properties of combined steel and concrete at elevated temperatures lack experimental data from previous research. This study aimed to investigate the behavior of the SCC core with a steel tube at ambient and elevated temperatures varying from 100 °C to 800 °C with 100 °C intervals for each test specimen. Tests were conducted on circular steel tubes filled with SCC for different grades (M25, M30, and M40) under compression at elevated temperatures. Experimental observations revealed that the stress–strain curve increased with increasing the cross-sectional area and grade of concrete. However, increasing the temperature and length-to-diameter ratio reduced the stress–strain curve. At elevated temperatures, confined SCC experienced a smaller decrease in the overall modulus of elasticity when compared to unconfined concrete. Within the compressive elastic region (from 30 °C to 400 °C), there was a significant relationship between lateral strain and longitudinal strain, which was followed by a sudden increase beyond 400 °C. Equations for various design parameters were proposed based on the peak load and confinement factor of confined SCC-filled steel tubes (SCCFSTs) via multiple regression. Moreover, this study developed load–axial shortening curves, identifying significant properties such as the yield strength of confined SCCFSTs, including the load-carrying capacity. The predicted numerical analysis results were well aligned with the experimental results, and the findings contributed valuable insights for designing resilient and durable combined SCC and steel tube infrastructures. Full article
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28 pages, 5121 KiB  
Review
Behavior of Fibers in Geopolymer Concrete: A Comprehensive Review
by Ujjwal Sharma, Nakul Gupta, Alireza Bahrami, Yasin Onuralp Özkılıç, Manvendra Verma, Parveen Berwal, Essam Althaqafi, Mohammad Amir Khan and Saiful Islam
Buildings 2024, 14(1), 136; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings14010136 - 04 Jan 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1342
Abstract
Over the last decades, cement has been observed to be the most adaptive material for global development in the construction industry. The use of ordinary concrete primarily requires the addition of cement. According to the record, there has been an increase in the [...] Read more.
Over the last decades, cement has been observed to be the most adaptive material for global development in the construction industry. The use of ordinary concrete primarily requires the addition of cement. According to the record, there has been an increase in the direct carbon footprint during cement production. The International Energy Agency, IEA, is working toward net zero emissions by 2050. To achieve this target, there should be a decline in the clinker-to-cement ratio. Also, the deployment of innovative technologies is required in the production of cement. The use of alternative binding materials can be an easy solution. There are several options for a substitute to cement as a binding agent, which are available commercially. Non-crystalline alkali-aluminosilicate geopolymers have gained the attention of researchers over time. Geopolymer concrete uses byproduct waste to reduce direct carbon dioxide emissions during production. Despite being this advantageous, its utilization is still limited as it shows the quasi-brittle behavior. Using different fibers has been started to overcome this weakness. This article emphasizes and reviews various mechanical properties of fiber-reinforced geopolymer concrete, focusing on its development and implementation in a wide range of applications. This study concludes that the use of fiber-reinforced geopolymer concrete should be commercialized after the establishment of proper standards for manufacturing. Full article
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