The Role of Amyloid in Neurological Disorders

A special issue of Biomolecules (ISSN 2218-273X). This special issue belongs to the section "Biomacromolecules: Proteins".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2024 | Viewed by 1305

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Cardiac, Thoracic, Vascular Sciences, and Public Health, University of Padua, 35128 Padua, Italy
Interests: heart and kidney transplantation; antibody mediated rejection; complement and DSA antibody; vasculitis; biomarkers mRNA; miRNA; systemic and cardiac amyloidosis; congenital heart diseases
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Guest Editor
Hematology Unit, Department of Medicine, Hospital University of Padua, Padova, Italy
Interests: plasma cell dyscrasias in particular multiple myeloma; AL amyloidosis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Interest in extracellular deposits of amorphous protein in the central and peripheral neurological system is growing due to new therapeutic strategies that could improve patients’ survival and quality of life. Amyloid-beta continues to be a most important diagnostic and prognostic issue for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other neurological disorders. Neuropathy is a common manifestation of both hereditary and acquired forms of systemic amyloidosis and may present with progressive sensorimotor polyneuropathy, focal neuropathy, autonomic neuropathy, and other unusual clinical presentations.

Many aspects have been defined in several papers published; that said, there are many others aspects still to be understood. In particular, we do not yet know how the process of this degenerative disease starts, nor do we understand its mechanisms of progression.

This Special Issue aims to collate expertise on neurological disorders due to amyloid protein; in doing so, it will clarify the role of amyloid in the central and peripheral nervous system and its relationship with the immune system. Novel developments in terms of therapeutic options involving proteins, peptides, and antibodies will also be described.

Dr. Marny Fedrigo
Dr. Tamara Berno
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • amyloid-beta
  • neurodegenerative disorders
  • aducanumab
  • oligomers
  • cross-amyloid intraction

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

14 pages, 2836 KiB  
Article
Uptake of 18F-AV45 in the Putamen Provides Additional Insights into Alzheimer’s Disease beyond the Cortex
by Zhengshi Yang, Jefferson W. Kinney, Dietmar Cordes and The Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative
Biomolecules 2024, 14(2), 157; https://doi.org/10.3390/biom14020157 - 29 Jan 2024
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Abstract
Cortical uptake in brain amyloid positron emission tomography (PET) is increasingly used for the biological diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD); however, the clinical and biological relevance of the striatum beyond the cortex in amyloid PET scans remains unclear. A total of 513 amyloid-positive [...] Read more.
Cortical uptake in brain amyloid positron emission tomography (PET) is increasingly used for the biological diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD); however, the clinical and biological relevance of the striatum beyond the cortex in amyloid PET scans remains unclear. A total of 513 amyloid-positive participants having 18F-AV45 amyloid PET scans available were included in the analysis. The associations between cognitive scores and striatal uptake were analyzed. The participants were categorized into three groups based on the residual from the linear fitting between 18F-AV45 uptake in the putamen and the cortex in the order of HighP > MidP > LowP group. We then examined the differences between these three groups in terms of clinical diagnosis, APOE genotype, CSF phosphorylated tau (ptau) concentration, hippocampal volume, entorhinal thickness, and cognitive decline rate to evaluate the additional insights provided by the putamen beyond the cortex. The 18F-AV45 uptake in the putamen was more strongly associated with ADAS-cog13 and MoCA scores (p < 0.001) compared to the uptake in the caudate nucleus. Despite comparable cortical uptakes, the HighP group had a two-fold higher risk of being ε4-homozygous or diagnosed with AD dementia compared to the LowP group. These three groups had significantly different CSF ptau concentration, hippocampal volume, entorhinal thickness, and cognitive decline rate. These findings suggest that the assessment of 18F-AV45 uptake in the putamen is of unique value for evaluating disease severity and predicting disease progression. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Role of Amyloid in Neurological Disorders)
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