New Strategies to Treat Corneal Endothelial Diseases: Cell Therapy, Bioengineering of Corneal Grafts and Pharmacological Treatment

A special issue of Bioengineering (ISSN 2306-5354). This special issue belongs to the section "Biomedical Engineering and Biomaterials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2024 | Viewed by 4072

Special Issue Editors

Laboratory "Biology, Engineering and Imaging for Ophthalmology", BiiO, Faculty of Medicine, health inovation campus, University Jean Monnet, 42270 Saint-Etienne, France
Interests: corneal endothelial cells; cell culture; cell therapy; FECD (Fuchs Endothelial Corneal Dystrophy); stem cells; eye banking; bioengineering of corneal endothelium; corneal epithelium; limbal stem cells; immunofluorescence; lens

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Laboratory "Biology, Engineering and Imaging for Ophthalmology", BiiO, Faculty of Medicine, Health Inovation Campus, University Jean Monnet, 42270 Saint-Etienne, France
2. Ophthalmology Department, University Hospital of Saint-Étienne, 42100 Saint-Etienne, France
Interests: cellular biology; animal developmental biology/ophthalmology

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Laboratory "Biology, Engineering and Imaging for Ophthalmology", BiiO, Faculty of Medicine, health inovation campus, University Jean Monnet, 42270 Saint-Etienne, France
2. Ophthalmology Department, University Hospital of Saint-Étienne, 42100 Saint-Etienne, France
Interests: corneal endothelial cells; cell culture; cell therapy; FECD (Fuchs Endothelial Corneal Dystrophy); stem cells; eye banking; bioengineering of corneal endothelium; corneal epithelium; limbal stem cells; immunofluorescence; lens

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Ten million patients suffer from bilateral corneal blindness, and only 1.4% of patients have received a corneal transplant due to a severe worldwide shortage of corneal donations (Gain et al., JAMA Ophthalmol, 2016). For the intermediate and late stages of endothelial dystrophies, cell therapy by injecting cultivated human corneal endothelial cells (CECs) into the anterior chamber has been shown to be effective in clinical trials and awaits its expansion (Kinoshita et al., NELM, 2018), and the bioengineering of corneal endothelial grafts is also an alternative method that has shown efficacy in animals. For the earlier stages of Fuchs endothelial corneal dystrophy (FECD), the most frequent endothelial disease, pharmacological treatments alone or in combination with surgery are in the pipelines (Okumura, Journal of Ophthalmology, 2017). All three strategies are in full development and will be applicable in the clinic within 5 to 10 years to replace corneal (endothelial) transplantation.

This Special Issue will focus on recent developments in the three strategies for the treatment of endothelial dystrophy: cell therapy, bioengineering of corneal grafts and pharmacological treatment.

The journal will be accepting contributions (both original articles and reviews) mainly centered on the following topics:

  • Progress in cell culture for obtaining CECs in vitro (primary cell culture of human CECs and realistic differentiation methods based on other types of stem cells or iPS);
  • Bioengineering of endothelial grafts (realistic new material and/or process);
  • Progress in the pharmacological treatment of FECD or endothelial dystrophy;
  • Any clinical cases of the application of the three strategies;
  • Any significant progress for supporting the development of the three strategies and their industrialization, such as ex vivo or in vitro models/tools for validation of the functionality of cultured CECs or of bioengineered endothelial grafts, and methods for the preservation of the human corneas, cultured cells and bioengineered endothelial grafts for industrialization;
  • New strategies and processes for the treatment of endothelial dystrophy.

Dr. Zhiguo He
Prof. Dr. Gilles Thuret
Dr. Sylvain Poinard
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Bioengineering is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • corneal endothelial cells
  • cell therapy
  • bioengineering of corneal endothelium
  • cell culture
  • FECD (Fuchs endothelial corneal dystrophy)

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

15 pages, 3262 KiB  
Article
Femtosecond Laser Cutting of Human Crystalline Lens Capsule and Decellularization for Corneal Endothelial Bioengineering
by Olfa Ben Moussa, Louise Parveau, Inès Aouimeur, Grégory Egaud, Corantin Maurin, Sofiane Fraine, Sébastien Urbaniak, Chantal Perrache, Zhiguo He, Sedao Xxx, Oliver Dorado Cortez, Sylvain Poinard, Cyril Mauclair, Philippe Gain and Gilles Thuret
Bioengineering 2024, 11(3), 255; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering11030255 - 5 Mar 2024
Viewed by 1037
Abstract
The bioengineering of corneal endothelial grafts consists of seeding in vitro cultured corneal endothelial cells onto a thin, transparent, biocompatible, and sufficiently robust carrier which can withstand surgical manipulations. This is one of the most realistic alternatives to donor corneas, which are in [...] Read more.
The bioengineering of corneal endothelial grafts consists of seeding in vitro cultured corneal endothelial cells onto a thin, transparent, biocompatible, and sufficiently robust carrier which can withstand surgical manipulations. This is one of the most realistic alternatives to donor corneas, which are in chronic global shortage. The anterior capsule of the crystalline lens has already been identified as one of the best possible carriers, but its challenging manual preparation has limited its use. In this study, we describe a femtosecond laser cutting process of the anterior capsule of whole lenses in order to obtain capsule discs of 8 mm diameter, similar to conventional endothelial grafts. Circular marks made on the periphery of the disc indicate its orientation. Immersion in water for 3 days is sufficient to completely remove the lens epithelial cells and to enable the seeding of corneal endothelial cells, which remain viable after 27 days of culture. Therefore, this method provides a transparent, decellularized disc ready to form viable tissue engineered endothelial grafts. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

11 pages, 3327 KiB  
Article
U-Net Convolutional Neural Network for Real-Time Prediction of the Number of Cultured Corneal Endothelial Cells for Cellular Therapy
by Naoki Okumura, Takeru Nishikawa, Chiaki Imafuku, Yuki Matsuoka, Yuna Miyawaki, Shinichi Kadowaki, Makiko Nakahara, Yasushi Matsuoka and Noriko Koizumi
Bioengineering 2024, 11(1), 71; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering11010071 - 11 Jan 2024
Viewed by 1076
Abstract
Corneal endothelial decompensation is treated by the corneal transplantation of donor corneas, but donor shortages and other problems associated with corneal transplantation have prompted investigations into tissue engineering therapies. For clinical use, cells used in tissue engineering must undergo strict quality control to [...] Read more.
Corneal endothelial decompensation is treated by the corneal transplantation of donor corneas, but donor shortages and other problems associated with corneal transplantation have prompted investigations into tissue engineering therapies. For clinical use, cells used in tissue engineering must undergo strict quality control to ensure their safety and efficacy. In addition, efficient cell manufacturing processes are needed to make cell therapy a sustainable standard procedure with an acceptable economic burden. In this study, we obtained 3098 phase contrast images of cultured human corneal endothelial cells (HCECs). We labeled the images using semi-supervised learning and then trained a model that predicted the cell centers with a precision of 95.1%, a recall of 92.3%, and an F-value of 93.4%. The cell density calculated by the model showed a very strong correlation with the ground truth (Pearson’s correlation coefficient = 0.97, p value = 8.10 × 10−52). The total cell numbers calculated by our model based on phase contrast images were close to the numbers calculated using a hemocytometer through passages 1 to 4. Our findings confirm the feasibility of using artificial intelligence-assisted quality control assessments in the field of regenerative medicine. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Review

Jump to: Research

21 pages, 1310 KiB  
Review
The Innovative Biomaterials and Technologies for Developing Corneal Endothelium Tissue Engineering Scaffolds: A Review and Prospect
by Miaomiao Chi, Bowei Yuan, Zijun Xie and Jing Hong
Bioengineering 2023, 10(11), 1284; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering10111284 - 3 Nov 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1319
Abstract
Corneal transplantation is the only treatment for corneal endothelial blindness. However, there is an urgent need to find substitutes for corneal endothelium grafts due to the global shortage of donor corneas. An emerging research field focuses on the construction of scaffold-based corneal endothelium [...] Read more.
Corneal transplantation is the only treatment for corneal endothelial blindness. However, there is an urgent need to find substitutes for corneal endothelium grafts due to the global shortage of donor corneas. An emerging research field focuses on the construction of scaffold-based corneal endothelium tissue engineering (CETE). Long-term success in CETE transplantation may be achieved by selecting the appropriate biomaterials as scaffolds of corneal endothelial cells and adding bioactive materials to promote cell activity. This article reviews the research progress of CETE biomaterials in the past 20 years, describes the key characteristics required for corneal endothelial scaffolds, and summarizes the types of materials that have been reported. Based on these, we list feasible improvement strategies for biomaterials innovation. In addition, we describe the improved techniques for the scaffolds’ surface topography and drug delivery system. Some promising technologies for constructing CETE are proposed. However, some questions have not been answered yet, and clinical trials and industrialization should be carried out with caution. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop