Biomechanical Evaluation of Bone Tissue Engineering

A special issue of Bioengineering (ISSN 2306-5354). This special issue belongs to the section "Biomedical Engineering and Biomaterials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 July 2024 | Viewed by 2094

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Biomechanics Laboratory, Department of Orthopedics, E-Da Hospital, Kaohsiung 824, Taiwan
Interests: orthopedic biomechanics; implant design; mechanics of biomaterials

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Medical Science and Technology, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung 80424, Taiwan
Interests: medical air and water purification systems; bionic bone materials; synthesis of biomaterial

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Achieving success in bone tissue engineering demands a delicate equilibrium among mechanical strength, biocompatibility, biodegradability, and bio-inductivity. Consequently, the meticulous selection of appropriate biomaterials and the optimization of engineered matrix properties emerge as pivotal facets within this domain. These new biomaterials may effectively promote bone regeneration and thus have a significant impact on individual patients and healthcare systems. This Special Issue aims to collect contributions from researchers and in the form of comprehensive reviews and research articles on recent advancements in the application and use of various biomaterials in bone tissue engineering.

In this Special Issue, we would like to present an innovative perspective on the scaffolds and implants for bone regeneration, biomechanical properties of biomaterials for bone tissue engineering and their importance in the interactions between biomaterials and living tissues, as well as studies on the preparation, performance, and use of biomaterials in biomedical devices in physiological environments. Topics will include, but not be limited to. scaffold design and fabrication; biomaterials for 3D printing, biocompatibility and biodegradability; host response to implants; cell–scaffold interactions; and scaffold-based drug delivery. Both original research articles and reviews are welcome. All papers will be published in an open-access format following a peer-review process.

Dr. Chih-Kun Hsiao
Dr. Wenfan Chen
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • biomechanics
  • mechanics of biomaterials
  • biomimetics
  • regenerative medicine
  • scaffold
  • synthetic
  • natural biomaterials
  • biomaterials for 3D printing
  • biomodelling and simulation

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

19 pages, 4435 KiB  
Article
Design, Manufacture, and Characterization of a Critical-Sized Gradient Porosity Dual-Material Tibial Defect Scaffold
by Ming-Chan Lee, Cheng-Tang Pan, Wen-Fan Chen, Meng-Chi Lin and Yow-Ling Shiue
Bioengineering 2024, 11(4), 308; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering11040308 - 25 Mar 2024
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 777
Abstract
This study proposed a composite tibia defect scaffold with radial gradient porosity, utilizing finite element analysis to assess stress in the tibial region with significant critical-sized defects. Simulations for scaffolds with different porosities were conducted, designing an optimal tibia defect scaffold with radial [...] Read more.
This study proposed a composite tibia defect scaffold with radial gradient porosity, utilizing finite element analysis to assess stress in the tibial region with significant critical-sized defects. Simulations for scaffolds with different porosities were conducted, designing an optimal tibia defect scaffold with radial gradient porosity for repairing and replacing critical bone defects. Radial gradient porosity scaffolds resulted in a more uniform stress distribution, reducing titanium alloy stiffness and alleviating stress shielding effects. The scaffold was manufactured using selective laser melting (SLM) technology with stress relief annealing to simplify porous structure fabrication. The study used New Zealand white rabbits’ tibia defect sites as simulation parameters, reconstructing the 3D model and implanting the composite scaffold. Finite element analysis in ANSYS-Workbench simulated forces under high-activity conditions, analyzing stress distribution and strain. In the simulation, the titanium alloy scaffold bore a maximum stress of 122.8626 MPa, while the centrally encapsulated HAp material delivered 27.92 MPa. The design demonstrated superior structural strength, thereby reducing stress concentration. The scaffold was manufactured using SLM, and the uniform design method was used to determine a collection of optimum annealing parameters. Nanoindentation and compression tests were used to determine the influence of annealing on the elastic modulus, hardness, and strain energy of the scaffold. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomechanical Evaluation of Bone Tissue Engineering)
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16 pages, 10327 KiB  
Article
Treatment of Lumbar Degenerative Disease with a Novel Interlaminar Screw Elastic Spacer Technique: A Finite Element Analysis
by Zebin Huang, Shu Liu, Maodan Nie, Jiabin Yuan, Xumiao Lin, Xuerong Chu and Zhicai Shi
Bioengineering 2023, 10(10), 1204; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering10101204 - 16 Oct 2023
Viewed by 918
Abstract
A novel interlaminar elastic screw spacer technique was designed to maintain lumbar mobility in treating lumbar degenerative diseases. A validated finite element model of L4/5 was used to establish an ISES-1/2 model and an ISES-1/3 model based on different insertion points, a unilateral [...] Read more.
A novel interlaminar elastic screw spacer technique was designed to maintain lumbar mobility in treating lumbar degenerative diseases. A validated finite element model of L4/5 was used to establish an ISES-1/2 model and an ISES-1/3 model based on different insertion points, a unilateral fixation model and a bilateral fixed model based on different fixation methods, and a Coflex-F model based on different implants. The elastic rods were used to fix screws. Under the same mechanical conditions, we compared the biomechanical characteristics to investigate the optimal entry point for ISES technology, demonstrate the effectiveness of unilateral fixation, and validate the feasibility of the ISES technique. Compared to ISES-1/3, the ISES-1/2 model had lower intradiscal pressure, facet cartilage stress, and posterior structural stress. Compared to the ISES-BF model, the ISES-UF model had lower intervertebral pressure, larger mobility, and smaller stress on the posterior structures. The ISES model had a similar intervertebral pressure and limitation of extension as the Coflex-F model. The ISES model retained greater mobility and reduced the stress on the facet cartilage and posterior structure compared with the Coflex-F model. Our study suggests that the ISES technique is a promising treatment of lumbar degenerative diseases, especially those with osteoporosis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomechanical Evaluation of Bone Tissue Engineering)
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