Biomaterials for Angiogenesis

A special issue of Bioengineering (ISSN 2306-5354). This special issue belongs to the section "Biomedical Engineering and Biomaterials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2024 | Viewed by 661

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Frankfurt Orofacial Regenerative Medicine, Department for Oral, Cranio-Maxillofacial and Facial Plastic Surgery, Medical Center of the Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Frankfurt, Germany
Interests: co-culture; primary cells; complex in vitro models; angiogenesis; osteogenesis; inflammation; blood concentrates

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The initial reaction that takes place when a biomaterial is implanted into the human body is a non-specific inflammatory response that can range from good biocompatibility with a mild inflammatory reaction through a rejection reaction to complete integration of the material in the optimal case. In this context, a rapid supply with blood vessels (vascularization) is considered one of the key factors in regeneration and is therefore crucial for a good integration of the material. Specifically, there is a need for the development of biocompatible and functional biomaterials that might improve the process of angiogenesis. In order to evaluate biomaterials’ biocompatibility and functionality (i.e., angiogenesis), the development of in vitro tissue engineered cell culture systems is essential since a better understanding of healing mechanisms can be generally assisted by in vitro studies. Tissue engineered human in vitro equivalents might significantly contribute to the understanding and improvement in developing new beneficial materials and might allow for the transfer into the clinic.

Scope: This Special Issue will focus on original research papers and comprehensive reviews, dealing with cutting-edge new developed biomaterials to improve angiogenesis, as well as establishing and investigating cell culture models and in vitro tissue equivalents to analyse/improve the process of angiogenesis and evaluate certain materials.

Dr. Eva Dohle
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • biomaterial
  • angiogenesis
  • vasculogenesis
  • tissue engineering
  • in vitro cell culture systems
  • tissue mimics
  • inflammation
  • growth factors
  • drug delivery

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

14 pages, 4665 KiB  
Article
Glycosaminoglycans Modulate the Angiogenic Ability of Type I Collagen-Based Scaffolds by Acting on Vascular Network Remodeling and Maturation
by Enrica Raffaella Grazia Salvante, Anca Voichita Popoiu, Amulya K. Saxena, Tudor Alexandru Popoiu, Eugen Sorin Boia, Anca Maria Cimpean, Florina Stefania Rus, Florica Ramona Dorobantu and Monica Chis
Bioengineering 2024, 11(5), 423; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering11050423 - 25 Apr 2024
Viewed by 570
Abstract
Type I collagen, prevalent in the extracellular matrix, is biocompatible and crucial for tissue engineering and wound healing, including angiogenesis and vascular maturation/stabilization as required processes of newly formed tissue constructs or regeneration. Sometimes, improper vascularization causes unexpected outcomes. Vascularization failure may be [...] Read more.
Type I collagen, prevalent in the extracellular matrix, is biocompatible and crucial for tissue engineering and wound healing, including angiogenesis and vascular maturation/stabilization as required processes of newly formed tissue constructs or regeneration. Sometimes, improper vascularization causes unexpected outcomes. Vascularization failure may be caused by extracellular matrix collagen and non-collagen components heterogeneously. This study compares the angiogenic potential of collagen type I-based scaffolds and collagen type I/glycosaminoglycans scaffolds by using the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) model and IKOSA digital image analysis. Two clinically used biomaterials, Xenoderm (containing type I collagen derived from decellularized porcine extracellular matrix) and a dual-layer collagen sponge (DLC, with a biphasic composition of type I collagen combined with glycosaminoglycans) were tested for their ability to induce new vascular network formation. The AI-based IKOSA app enhanced the research by calculating from stereomicroscopic images angiogenic parameters such as total vascular area, branching sites, vessel length, and vascular thickness. The study confirmed that Xenoderm caused a fast angiogenic response and substantial vascular growth, but was unable to mature the vascular network. DLC scaffold, in turn, produced a slower angiogenic response, but a more steady and organic vascular maturation and stabilization. This research can improve collagen-based knowledge by better assessing angiogenesis processes. DLC may be preferable to Xenoderm or other materials for functional neovascularization, according to the findings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomaterials for Angiogenesis)
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