Hearing Loss: Causes, Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

A special issue of Audiology Research (ISSN 2039-4349).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2024 | Viewed by 2611

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
1st Academic ENT Department, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, AHEPA Hospital, 546 36 Thessaloniki, Greece
Interests: hearing rehabilitation; middle and inner ear; ear surgery; cochlear implantation; auditory brainstem responses; facial nerve electrophysiology
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Hearing loss represents one of the most wide-ranging disabilities, affecting more than 5% of the world’s population. Different types of hearing loss, including conductive and sensorineural hearing loss, may lead to serious hearing impairments in children and adults. Multiple causes may be involved in the aetiopathogenesis of hearing loss, depending on the different biologic mechanisms, including congenital and autoimmune. Diagnosis and management continue to be a challenge for hearing disorders such as chronic otitis media, otosclerosis, cholesteatoma, congenital or acquired sensorineural hearing loss, sudden sensorineural or metabolic hearing loss, and otogenic facial palsy. Electrophysiology and neuroscience approaches are needed in order to better elucidate the diagnostic dilemmas in the field of otology and neurotology. New treatment options will be discussed to improve potential methods of hearing restoration.

We especially encourage submissions concerning hearing aids, cochlear/vestibular/auditory brainstem implantation, middle ear surgery, and stapedotomy:

  • age-related hearing loss
  • genes associated with hearing loss
  • speech perception testings
  • pathophysiologic patterns for hearing loss
  • neuroimaging for inner ear
  • electrophysiologic evaluation of hearing loss
  • surgery for hearing loss / cophosis

Dr. George K. Psillas
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Audiology Research is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • genetics
  • speech perception
  • conductive hearing loss
  • sensorineural hearing loss
  • neuroimaging
  • electrophysiology
  • cochlear implants

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

9 pages, 231 KiB  
Article
Assessing the Effectiveness of Different Hyperbaric Oxygen Treatment Methods in Patients with Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss
by Paweł Rozbicki, Jacek Usowski, Sandra Krzywdzińska, Dariusz Jurkiewicz and Jacek Siewiera
Audiol. Res. 2024, 14(2), 333-341; https://doi.org/10.3390/audiolres14020029 - 29 Mar 2024
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Abstract
Introduction: Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) is one of the treatment methods in patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL). It is recommended as an elective treatment in patients undergoing steroid therapy. According to current scientific reports, HBOT should be implemented within two weeks [...] Read more.
Introduction: Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) is one of the treatment methods in patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL). It is recommended as an elective treatment in patients undergoing steroid therapy. According to current scientific reports, HBOT should be implemented within two weeks after the first symptoms. However, as far as the profile of HBOT is concerned, there are no straightforward recommendations. Methods: The data obtained from the medical records of 218 patients undergoing HBOT for SSNHL at the Military Institute of Medicine—National Research Institute were analyzed statistically for the impact of the duration and the delay in implementing HBOT on the end results of pure-tone audiometry (PTA). Results: A statistically significant hearing improvement in patients undergoing more than 15 cycles of HBOT was detected at all frequencies except for 1500 Hz; in the group reporting for treatment with a delay of more than 10 days, hearing improvement was statistically unsignificant at frequencies of 1500, 3000, and 4000 Hz. Conclusions: The statistical analysis showed that the urgent onset of HBOT could be a significant factor in the therapy of SSNHL. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hearing Loss: Causes, Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment)
11 pages, 1136 KiB  
Article
Over-the-Counter (OTC) Hearing Aid Availability across the Spectrum of Human Skin Colors
by Shade Avery Kirjava and Sam Jones Faulkner
Audiol. Res. 2024, 14(2), 293-303; https://doi.org/10.3390/audiolres14020026 - 12 Mar 2024
Viewed by 766
Abstract
Background: Over-the-counter (OTC) hearing aids were recently approved for sale in the United States. Research has shown that consumers prefer hearing devices that match their skin color because these devices are less noticeable. Colorism is discrimination against individuals with relatively darker skin that [...] Read more.
Background: Over-the-counter (OTC) hearing aids were recently approved for sale in the United States. Research has shown that consumers prefer hearing devices that match their skin color because these devices are less noticeable. Colorism is discrimination against individuals with relatively darker skin that manifests in “skin-color” product offerings as products being offered primarily in relatively lighter colors. Methods: This study compared images of U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-registered over-the-counter hearing aids to a range of human skin colors. Results: Most over-the-counter hearing aids are only offered in relatively lighter beige colors. Few over-the-counter hearing aids are available in darker skin colors. Conclusions: These findings may represent structural bias, preventing equitable access to darker skin-color OTC hearing aids for individuals with darker skin. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hearing Loss: Causes, Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment)
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13 pages, 7876 KiB  
Article
Renewed Concept of Mastoid Cavity Obliteration with the Use of Temporoparietal Fascial Flap Injected by Injectable Platelet-Rich Fibrin after Subtotal Petrosectomy for Cochlear Implant Patients
by Aleksander Zwierz, Krystyna Masna, Paweł Burduk, Stephan Hackenberg and Matthias Scheich
Audiol. Res. 2024, 14(2), 280-292; https://doi.org/10.3390/audiolres14020025 - 1 Mar 2024
Viewed by 759
Abstract
Background: The subtotal petrosectomy procedure may be useful for cochlear implantation in selected patient groups. Although it is highly effective, complications can arise, which may have economic implications for the patient due to the high cost of the device. Therefore, several authors have [...] Read more.
Background: The subtotal petrosectomy procedure may be useful for cochlear implantation in selected patient groups. Although it is highly effective, complications can arise, which may have economic implications for the patient due to the high cost of the device. Therefore, several authors have attempted to identify the most effective concept for obliteration. Methods: We present a pilot descriptive study of application techniques for obliterating cavities after subtotal petrosectomy using a temporoparietal fascial flap (TPFF) modified with injectable platelet-rich fibrin (IPRF+) for three cochlear implant (CI) patients. Results: Our concept preserves important anatomical structures, such as the temporalis muscle, which covers the CI receiver–stimulator. Injection of IPRF+ also increases the available tissue volume for obliteration and enhances its anti-inflammatory and regenerative potential. Conclusions: To the best of our knowledge, the use of TPFF for filling the cavity has not been adopted for CI with SP and for blind sac closure. Our literature review and our experience with this small group of patients suggest that this procedure, when combined with IPRF+ injections, may reduce the risk of potential infection in the obliterated cavity, particularly when used with CI. This technique is applicable only in cases when the surgeons are convinced that the middle ear cavity is purged of cholesteatoma. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hearing Loss: Causes, Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment)
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