Feature Papers in Applied Biosciences 2024

A special issue of Applied Biosciences (ISSN 2813-0464).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2024 | Viewed by 1051

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072, Australia
2. ARC Centre of Excellence for Plant Success in Nature and Agriculture, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072, Australia
Interests: genomics; transcriptomics; plant adaptation; wild crop relatives; output traits
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, College of Sciences, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115, USA
Interests: microbial ecology; biotechnology; growth kinetics and stoichiometry; fermentation; mathematical models of microbial growth; genome-scale metabolic reconstructions; history of microbiology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Faculty of Medicine, Department Medical Physics, School of Health Sciences, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina, Greece
Interests: optical methods for tissue diagnostics; bio-molecular spectroscopy; x-ray diffraction; computational biophysics and drug design; molecular modeling
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Many advances in technologies underpinning biosciences have accelerated the potential for the application of novel approaches to the major challenges of human health and well-being. It is important that those developing these technologies connect with those looking to apply them to deliver new solutions. Applied Biosciences (ISSN 2813-0464) has the opportunity to contribute to this knowledge exchange.

We are pleased to announce this Special Issue focusing on new advances in the biotechnology, biosciences and bioengineering of plants, animals and humans.

We welcome the submission of manuscripts from Editorial Board Members and from outstanding scholars invited by the Editorial Board Members and the Editorial Office. The following are suggested (as examples of options) as submission topics:

  • Advances in drug discovery;
  • Microscopy and molecular imaging technology developments;
  • Advances in antibody engineering;
  • Novel bioassay technologies;
  • New bioinformatics tools;
  • Recent applications of genome engineering in plants or animals;
  • Cell engineering;
  • Enzyme engineering;
  • Applications of nanobiotechnology;
  • Advances in the production and use of biopolymers;
  • Novel vaccine technologies/mRNA vaccines;
  • Algal products and production systems;
  • Advances in long-read DNA sequencing;
  • Biomass processing technologies;
  • Production of biomaterials and biofuels;
  • Advanced biomanufacturing;
  • Microbial biotechnology.

We hope you can participate in this Special Issue and look forward to receiving your contributions.

Prof. Dr. Robert Henry
Dr. Nicolai S. Panikov
Dr. Nikolaos Kourkoumelis
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Biosciences is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • advances in drug discovery
  • microscopy and molecular imaging technology developments
  • advances in antibody engineering
  • novel bioassay technologies
  • new bioinformatics tools
  • recent applications of genome engineering in plants or animals
  • cell engineering
  • enzyme engineering
  • applications of nanobiotechnology
  • advances in the production and use of biopolymers
  • novel vaccine technologies/mRNA vaccines
  • algal products and production systems
  • advances in long-read DNA sequencing
  • biomass processing technologies
  • production of biomaterials and biofuels
  • advanced biomanufacturing
  • microbial biotechnology

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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13 pages, 2694 KiB  
Article
Orthotic Thermoplastic Demonstrates a Similar Contamination Potential with Bacillus Bacteria Recovered from Thermoplastic Radiation Therapy Patient Masks
by Catherine W. Brock, Dev V. Mehta and Terrence J. Ravine
Appl. Biosci. 2024, 3(2), 250-262; https://doi.org/10.3390/applbiosci3020017 - 1 Jun 2024
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Abstract
Thermoplastics used to construct a variety of patient medical devices can become contaminated by harmful bacteria. We investigated whether two different Bacillus species recovered from patient radiation therapy thermoplastic masks could similarly contaminate thermoplastic material used to construct patient orthoses (splints). Bacillus bacteria [...] Read more.
Thermoplastics used to construct a variety of patient medical devices can become contaminated by harmful bacteria. We investigated whether two different Bacillus species recovered from patient radiation therapy thermoplastic masks could similarly contaminate thermoplastic material used to construct patient orthoses (splints). Bacillus bacteria form dormant spores, which have been shown to enhance its attachment to thermoplastics. Bacterial attachment and recovery were examined using an orthotic thermoplastic with an anti-stick coating being compared to uncoated material used in radiation therapy applications. Triplicate sample squares were seeded with a saline suspension of either B. cereus (MAB03F) or B. megaterium (DAB01F) containing a similar number of spores. Squares were subsequently sampled at 1 h, 1 week, 2 weeks, 4 weeks, and 8 weeks. The number of recovered bacteria was counted. Differences in material hydrophobicity were determined by water contact angle analysis. Both Bacillus species attached to each material within 1 h, and their spores were recovered at 8 weeks. However, a decreasing trend in adhesion, over time, was noted to the coated material with an opposite increasing trend in the uncoated material. Decreased Bacillus species spore adhesion to coated material with a lower hydrophobicity suggests a greater potential for spore transfer to patients wearing contaminated orthoses. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Applied Biosciences 2024)
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Review

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20 pages, 1576 KiB  
Review
Sustainable Pulse Proteins: Physical, Chemical and Fermentative Modifications
by Seedhabadee Ganeshan, Nancy Asen, Yingxin Wang, Mehmet Ç. Tülbek and Michael T. Nickerson
Appl. Biosci. 2024, 3(2), 263-282; https://doi.org/10.3390/applbiosci3020018 - 12 Jun 2024
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Abstract
Pulse proteins are playing significant roles in the alternative protein space due to the demand for foods produced in an environmentally sustainable manner and, most importantly, due to the demand for foods of nutritious value. There has been extensive research to mimic animal-derived [...] Read more.
Pulse proteins are playing significant roles in the alternative protein space due to the demand for foods produced in an environmentally sustainable manner and, most importantly, due to the demand for foods of nutritious value. There has been extensive research to mimic animal-derived meat texture, flavour, mouthfeel, etc. However, there is still the perception that many of the plant-based proteins that have been texturized to mimic meat are still highly processed and contain chemicals or preservatives, reducing their appeal as being healthy and precluding any sustainable benefits. To counter this notion, the biotransformation of pulse proteins using enzymes or fermentation offers unique opportunities. Thus, this review will address the significance of pulse proteins in the alternative protein space and some of the processing aids leading to the isolation and modification of such protein concentrates in a sustainable manner. Fermentation-based valorization of pulse proteins will also be discussed as a “clean label” strategy (further adding to sustainable nutritious plant protein production), although some of the processes like the extensive use of water in submerged fermentation need to be addressed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Applied Biosciences 2024)
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16 pages, 4320 KiB  
Review
Moringa oleifera Seed Cake: A Review on the Current Status of Green Nanoparticle Synthesis
by Nuno Coelho, Alice S. Pereira and Pedro Tavares
Appl. Biosci. 2024, 3(2), 197-212; https://doi.org/10.3390/applbiosci3020013 - 29 Apr 2024
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Abstract
Growing demands for sustainable and ecological nanoparticle synthesis methods have incentivized the scientific community to develop new approaches to counteract these challenges. Green synthesis resorts to biocomponents obtained from plants, bacteria, fungi, and other organisms to synthesize nanostructures, with beneficial gains in the [...] Read more.
Growing demands for sustainable and ecological nanoparticle synthesis methods have incentivized the scientific community to develop new approaches to counteract these challenges. Green synthesis resorts to biocomponents obtained from plants, bacteria, fungi, and other organisms to synthesize nanostructures, with beneficial gains in the economic and ecological cost associated with the process, simplicity of the process, and resource efficiency. Moringa oleifera, a native plant originally from India with immense nutritive value, has long been used by researchers in the biosynthesis of nanoparticles. Leaves, flowers, bark, and seeds are among the “miracle tree” parts that can be used in nanoparticle green synthesis. Moringa oleifera seed cake, a by-product obtained from defatted seeds, is often overlooked due to its apparent low commercial value. The main objective of this review is to highlight the recent findings reported in the literature on nanoparticles/nanocomposites synthesized with seed cake biocompounds acting as reducing/capping agents. Furthermore, we analyzed the methods currently employed for the extraction of bioactive compounds. Moringa oleifera seed for industrial applications was also addressed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Applied Biosciences 2024)
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