Recent Advances in Milk and Meat Products—The Influence of Animal Breed, Nutrition and Growth Conditions

A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615). This special issue belongs to the section "Animal Products".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2024 | Viewed by 956

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Food Microbiology, Meat Technology and Chemistry, University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, Olsztyn, Poland
Interests: meat; beef; functional meat products; cooking; composition
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Guest Editor
Institute of Animal Reproduction and Food Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, 10-719 Olsztyn, Poland
Interests: milk of different mammals; fermentation; bioactive compounds of milk; allergenicity of milk; immunoreactivity of food; food safety
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Due to sensory and nutritional benefits, products of animal origin have always been very popular among consumers. Especially in the last decade, there have been many dietary trends (paleo, keto) in which good-quality animal products are essential to such a diet. Still, many factors, such as the animal breed, nutrition, welfare and growth conditions, influence the quality of animal-derived raw materials. The adaptation of various animal species (both the restoration of old breeds and the use of new ones) to obtain milk or meat also confronts scientists with new challenges.

We are pleased to invite you to contribute to this Special Issue focused on animal-derived food. We are open to incorporating interdisciplinary or transdisciplinary research to provide an integrated understanding of the role of animal breed, welfare and diet, and their relationships with milk and meat quality.

This Special Issue will be focused on recent research that investigates novel approaches to monitor the meat and milk quality of farmed, captive, or wild animals with particular emphasis on the role of diet, welfare and breed. We kindly invite you to present original papers as well as reviews.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Dr. Monika Modzelewska-Kapituła
Dr. Anna Ogrodowczyk
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Animals is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • animal-derived food quality
  • milk quality and safety
  • meat quality and safety
  • animal breed influence on food quality
  • animal feeding influence on food quality
  • animal welfare influence on food quality
  • animal growth conditions influence on food quality
  • functional milk products
  • functional meat products

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

24 pages, 1893 KiB  
Article
Zinc Supplementation Improves Texture, Oxidative Stability of Caciotta Cheese and Reduces Biogenic Amines Production
by Carmela Sorice, Andrea Ianni, Francesca Bennato, Mirella Bellocci, Valentina Pavone, Lisa Grotta, Clemencia Chaves López and Giuseppe Martino
Animals 2024, 14(11), 1642; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani14111642 - 31 May 2024
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Abstract
Zinc is essential for animals, playing a vital role in enzyme systems and various biochemical reactions. It is crucial to ensure a sufficient intake of zinc through the diet to maintain efficient homeostasis. Only few studies on zinc effect in cow lactating diet [...] Read more.
Zinc is essential for animals, playing a vital role in enzyme systems and various biochemical reactions. It is crucial to ensure a sufficient intake of zinc through the diet to maintain efficient homeostasis. Only few studies on zinc effect in cow lactating diet evaluated the effects on milk and cheese quality, with conflicting findings. 24 cows of the Friesian breed were divided into two groups (CTR: control and TRT: treated group). Cows were selected for age, body weight, parity and phase of lactations (mid lactation, 140–160 days). CTR diet contained 38 mg/kg of Zn and TRT diet was supplied with 120 mg/kg of complete feed for 60 days. The objective of current investigation was to evaluate the impact of a dietary Zinc Oxide (ZnO) integration of lactating Friesian cows on chemical composition, zinc content, fatty acid and proteic profile, ammine content, pH, aw, texture, and sensory profile of cheese and to improve the chemical-nutritional quality of milk and cheese. The results showed that ZnO supplementation reduced mesophilic aerobic bacteria and Presumptive Pseudomonas spp. growth, proteolysis, biogenic amines content, lipid oxidation, odour intensity and sour and increased hardness, gumminess, chewiness, elasticity of cheese. Biogenic amines are considered an important aspect of food safety. ZnO integration in cow diet could represent a promising strategy for improving the quality, the safety and shelf-life of caciotta cheese. Full article
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13 pages, 1059 KiB  
Article
Effects of Sex on Growth Performance, Carcass Traits, Blood Biochemical Parameters, and Meat Quality of XueShan Chickens
by Chunyou Yuan, Yong Jiang, Zhixiu Wang, Guohong Chen, Guobin Chang and Hao Bai
Animals 2024, 14(11), 1556; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani14111556 - 24 May 2024
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Abstract
The demand for high-quality chilled chicken has continued to increase in China. Chickens are sexually dimorphic, and to better understand the specific differences in chicken production based on sex, we examined how sex affects growth performance, carcass traits, and meat quality of yellow-feathered [...] Read more.
The demand for high-quality chilled chicken has continued to increase in China. Chickens are sexually dimorphic, and to better understand the specific differences in chicken production based on sex, we examined how sex affects growth performance, carcass traits, and meat quality of yellow-feathered chickens. Male and female Xueshan chickens were used as the experimental model. Although males exhibited better growth performance, including body weight (BW), body slope, keel, shank length, and shank girth (p < 0.05), as well as carcass traits, such as dressed weight, leg muscle, and lean meat, females had higher carcass and breast muscle yields (p < 0.05). Males had higher follicle density and yellowness (b*) of the skin and better skin than females (p < 0.05). Among blood biochemical parameters, the serum content of corticosterone (CORT) was higher in males, while those of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX), total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC), and catalase (CAT) were lower in males than in females (p < 0.05). The pH levels, shear force, and moisture content quality were better in male breast meat, while the intramuscular fat content (IMF) was lower in males than in females (p < 0.05). The redness (a*) and moisture content were higher in male leg meat, while the pH, water-loss rate (WLR), lightness (L*), and IMF were lower (p < 0.05). The muscle fiber diameter and cross-sectional area were also higher in males (p < 0.05). Consumers felt that soup of male chicken was better than female (p < 0.05), while mouthfeel and tenderness acceptance of breast meat were different between the sexes. These results indicate that female chickens can be marketed as a whole carcass, while males are more suitable for processed carcass products. This study provides significant insights into the production and processing methodologies of yellow-feathered chickens. Full article
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