Advances in Image-Guided Veterinary Surgery

A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615). This special issue belongs to the section "Veterinary Clinical Studies".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 May 2024 | Viewed by 12755

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Perugia, Via San Costanzo 4, 06126 Perugia, Italy
Interests: veterinary surgery

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Co-Guest Editor
Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Sassari, Via Vienna, 2 -07100- Sassari, Italy
Interests: thoracic and abdominal ultrasound; cardiovascular ultrasonography, veterinary cardiology

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Co-Guest Editor
Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy
Interests: internal medicine; thoracic and abdominal ultrasonography; CEUS; interventional procedures
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the past few decades, medical imaging has been used as a preoperative and/or intraoperative guide for veterinary surgeons. Imaging systems, such as X-rays, fluoroscopy, ultrasonography, CT and MRI, provide surgeons with a detailed and patient-specific anatomic description of the designated area before surgery. Moreover, intraoperative imaging allows the surgeon to track surgical instruments in hybrid operating rooms in order to directly or indirectly guide the surgical procedures. Imaging techniques can be used in open surgeries, minimally invasive surgeries or diagnostic/therapeutic procedures. This multidisciplinary approach enhances the safety and improves the accuracy of the surgery, reduces tissue trauma (especially using minimally invasive image-guided surgery or interventional procedures), helps to identify tumor margins and finally improves the outcome.

This Special Issue of Animals aims to collect the most significant and recent research regarding the use of preoperative and intraoperative medical imaging techniques used to support veterinary surgery. Authors are invited to submit relevant research studies, review articles and case reports about image-guided surgery in veterinary medicine.

Prof. Dr. Antonello Bufalari
Dr. Andrea Corda
Dr. Domenico Caivano
Guest Editors

 

Keywords

  • medical imaging
  • surgery
  • minimally invasive surgery
  • interventional procedure
  • intraoperative imaging

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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13 pages, 2322 KiB  
Article
A Single-Port, Multiple-Access, Custom-Made Device Used in Laparoscopically Assisted Cryptorchidectomy in Standing Horses—A Preliminary Study
by Rafaela das Mercês Silva, Luiz Henrique Vilela Araújo, Thiago da Silva Cardoso, Stephany Lorrane Ishida Franco, Heytor Jales Gurgel, Pedro Henrique Lira Cerqueira, Lucas Santos Carvalho, Luis Gustavo e Silva Novais, José Leandro da Silva Gonçalves, Loise Araújo de Sousa, Rodrigo dos Santos Albuquerque, Marcos Duarte Dutra, Tatiane Teles Albernaz Ferreira, José Alcides da Silveira, Marco Augusto Machado Silva, Francisco Décio de Oliveira Monteiro and Pedro Paulo Maia Teixeira
Animals 2024, 14(7), 1091; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani14071091 - 03 Apr 2024
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Abstract
This study evaluates a new multiport device with single access to the abdominal cavity produced with routine hospital supplies that could be applied to laparoscopically assisted cryptorchidectomy in standing horses. Initially, the new device was evaluated on five cadavers of bovine fetuses ( [...] Read more.
This study evaluates a new multiport device with single access to the abdominal cavity produced with routine hospital supplies that could be applied to laparoscopically assisted cryptorchidectomy in standing horses. Initially, the new device was evaluated on five cadavers of bovine fetuses (n = 5), placed assisted in a minilaparotomy performed in the flank region. Subsequently, the device was evaluated in four cryptorchid horses treated during the hospital routine. During the evaluation of the new device, the possibilities of exploring the abdominal cavity, inspection, and intra-abdominal manipulation with two Babcock forceps were verified. The possibilities were described, and surgical time data were recorded and analyzed using descriptive statistics. In the cadavers, a wide exploration of the abdominal cavity was possible, with a laparoscopic inspection through the right paralumbar fossa and manipulation of intra-abdominal structures with Babcock forceps inserted by the new device. In cryptorchid horses, laparoscopically assisted cryptorchidectomy with a new device was feasible in two patients, and in the others, it allowed the diagnosis of adhesions and ectopic locations in the inguinal region of testicles retained in the cavity. Therefore, the new device was efficient in exploring the inguinal region of cryptorchid horses in the standing position. The present study is preliminary and can support future studies that aim to improve the developed prototype. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Image-Guided Veterinary Surgery)
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12 pages, 1309 KiB  
Article
Ultrasound-Guided Radiofrequency Ablation of Chemodectomas in Five Dogs
by Pablo Gómez Ochoa, María Dolores Alférez, Ignacio de Blas, Telmo Fernendes, Xavier Sánchez Salguero, Beatriz Balañá, Antonio Meléndez Lazo, Alicia Barbero Fernandez, Domenico Caivano, Francesca Corda and Andrea Corda
Animals 2021, 11(10), 2790; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani11102790 - 24 Sep 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 3572
Abstract
Chemodectomas are low prevalence tumors with complex clinical management. Many present as an incidental finding however, in other dogs, they produce pericardial effusion and/or compression, leading to the appearance of severe clinical signs. There are currently several approaches: surgery, radiotherapy, stent placement and [...] Read more.
Chemodectomas are low prevalence tumors with complex clinical management. Many present as an incidental finding however, in other dogs, they produce pericardial effusion and/or compression, leading to the appearance of severe clinical signs. There are currently several approaches: surgery, radiotherapy, stent placement and chemotherapy. This is the first description of percutaneous echo-guided radiofrequency ablation of aortic body tumors. This minimally invasive treatment is based on high frequency alternating electrical currents from an electrode that produces ionic agitation and generates frictional heat, causing coagulation necrosis. Five dogs with an echocardiographic and cytological diagnosis of chemodectoma underwent percutaneous echo-guided radiofrequency ablation. At the time of presentation, all the dogs showed clinical signs, such as ascites and/or collapse. There were no complications either during the procedure or in the following 24 hours. Rapid clinical improvement associated with a reduction in size and change in sonographic appearance of the mass were achieved with no complications. Six months follow-up was carried out in all dogs. A second percutaneous echo-guided RFA was performed eight months after the first procedure in one dog. Based on our experience, radiofrequency ablation seems to be a feasible and safe technique, making it a potential alternative therapeutic approach in the clinical management of aortic body tumors leading to severe clinical compromise. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Image-Guided Veterinary Surgery)
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Review

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12 pages, 3817 KiB  
Review
Application of Ultrasound in Detecting and Removing Migrating Grass Awns in Dogs and Cats: A Systematic Review
by Domenico Caivano, Francesca Corda, Andrea Corda, Giulia Moretti and Antonello Bufalari
Animals 2023, 13(13), 2071; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani13132071 - 22 Jun 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1836
Abstract
Migrating grass awns are an important cause of disease in dogs and cats. Plant awns can migrate into several body tissues and cavities because of their fusiform shape and backward-pointing barbs. Their migration causes inflammatory tissue reaction and clinical signs depend upon their [...] Read more.
Migrating grass awns are an important cause of disease in dogs and cats. Plant awns can migrate into several body tissues and cavities because of their fusiform shape and backward-pointing barbs. Their migration causes inflammatory tissue reaction and clinical signs depend upon their localization. Ultrasound has been described as a useful, noninvasive, and readily available tool to identify and guide vegetal foreign bodies removal in animals. The aim of this systematic review was to summarize current knowledge on the application of ultrasonography in the identification and removal of grass awns from various anatomic locations in dogs and cats. We selected and analyzed 46 papers on the application of ultrasonography in dogs and cats affected by migrating grass awns. The ultrasonographic appearance of grass awns is characteristic, although their size and location can influence the visualization and the attempt of removal. In some cases, migrating grass awns are not directly visualized by ultrasonography, but the lesions caused by their migration can be easily seen. Ultrasonography can be considered a useful diagnostic tool to localize and remove migrating grass awns; however, when the migration occurs in less accessible locations or discrete foreign bodies are present, this diagnostic tool should be considered as a part of a multidisciplinary approach with advanced diagnostic imaging modalities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Image-Guided Veterinary Surgery)
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11 pages, 2990 KiB  
Review
Usefulness of Imaging Techniques in the Diagnosis of Selected Injuries and Lesions of the Canine Tarsus. A Review
by Justyna Abako, Piotr Holak, Joanna Głodek and Yauheni Zhalniarovich
Animals 2021, 11(6), 1834; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani11061834 - 19 Jun 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 5666
Abstract
Tarsus lesions are not common in dogs, but they can cause serious health problem. They can lead to permanent changes in the joint and, in dogs involved in canine sports, to exclusion from training. The most common diseases and injuries involving the tarsal [...] Read more.
Tarsus lesions are not common in dogs, but they can cause serious health problem. They can lead to permanent changes in the joint and, in dogs involved in canine sports, to exclusion from training. The most common diseases and injuries involving the tarsal joint are osteochondrosis, fractures and ruptures of the Achilles tendon. These conditions can be diagnosed primarily through accurate orthopedic examination, but even this may be insufficient for performing a proper diagnosis. Imaging modalities such as radiography, ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography can facilitate the detection and assessment of lesions in the canine tarsal joint. This review paper briefly presents some characteristics of the above-mentioned imaging techniques, offering a comparison of their utility in the diagnosis of lesions and injuries involving the canine tarsus. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Image-Guided Veterinary Surgery)
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