Small Animal Surgery Focus on Soft Tissue and Orthopedic Minimally Invasive Surgery

A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615). This special issue belongs to the section "Veterinary Clinical Studies".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 July 2024 | Viewed by 1395

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Clinic for Small Animals Surgery, Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Zurich, CH-8057 Zurich, Switzerland
Interests: surgical oncology; maxillofacial surgery; minimally invasive surgery; sentinel lymph node biopsy; reconstructive surgery

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Guest Editor
Clinic for Small Animals Surgery, Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Zurich, CH-8057 Zurich, Switzerland
Interests: stifle; joint; arthroscopy; minimally invasive surgery; meniscus; orthopedic surgery; fractures; MIPO; joint replacement

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Guest Editor
Clinica Veterinaria Nervianese, 20014 Nerviano, MI, Italy
Interests: soft-tissue surgery; minimally invasive surgery; laparoscopy; thoracoscopy; surgical oncology; reconstructive surgery

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are proud to host a Special Issue on soft tissue and orthopedic minimally invasive surgery in small animals in the open access journal Animals.

We invite our colleagues to submit original research, clinical case series and single case reports on laparoscopy, thoracoscopy, laparoscopic and thoracoscopic-assisted procedures; minimally invasive fracture fixation (MIO and MIPO); arthroscopy; minimally invasive neurosurgery; as well as any procedure that aims to minimize the surgical dose.

As the standards of care for pet animals continue to increase, interest has been drawn to the development of surgical techniques that allow the surgical dose to be minimized without compromising the effectiveness of the procedure. In this scenario, several minimally invasive surgical procedures have been described and validated against the traditional open techniques, with promising results. Indeed, a minimally invasive approach aims to reduce the amount of surgical dissection and tissue trauma, thus minimizing the surgical morbidity and postoperative pain, and potentially allowing for a faster recovery and return to function. This consideration holds true both for soft tissue and surgical oncology, with laparoscopic and thoracoscopic or assisted techniques leading the way in reducing the surgical dose; and for orthopedics and traumatology, where minimally invasive osteosyntheses and arthroscopic approaches are gaining increasing levels of consent.

As the field of minimally invasive surgery continues to grow, a vast number of procedures are constantly being tested and validated. Hence, with this Special Issue, we would like to encourage the submission and publication of research that focuses on the description of minimally invasive techniques, their surgical outcome and potential benefits, compared to a standard surgical approach.

Dr. Lavinia Elena Chiti
Prof. Dr. Antonio Pozzi
Dr. Federico Massari
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Animals is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

 

Keywords

  • minimally invasive surgery
  • laparoscopy
  • thoracoscopy
  • minimally invasive osteosynthesis
  • arthroscopy
  • dog
  • cat
  • minimally invasive neurosurgery

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

8 pages, 3404 KiB  
Communication
Accuracy of Instrument Portal Placement Using a Custom-Made 3D-Printed Aiming Device versus Free Hand Technique in Canine Elbow Arthroscopy
by Piotr Trębacz, Jan Frymus, Anna Barteczko, Mateusz Pawlik, Aleksandra Kurkowska and Michał Czopowicz
Animals 2023, 13(23), 3592; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani13233592 - 21 Nov 2023
Viewed by 983
Abstract
While the insertion of the arthroscope into the elbow joint is relatively easy based on anatomical landmarks, obtaining a correctly located instrument portal is often difficult. Therefore, the goal of the study was to create a 3D-printed prototype of an aiming device for [...] Read more.
While the insertion of the arthroscope into the elbow joint is relatively easy based on anatomical landmarks, obtaining a correctly located instrument portal is often difficult. Therefore, the goal of the study was to create a 3D-printed prototype of an aiming device for the guiding needle, and to check its feasibility. The study included fresh cadavers of 15 dogs, 9 males and 6 females, aged from 1 to 6 years (median 4 years) with body weight from 17 to 57 kg (median 30 kg). On each dog, we compared the number of attempts needed to obtain optimal direction of the guiding needle for the portal, using one elbow the prototype, and performing this as control on the opposite joint without the prototype (with a free hand). The number of attempts needed was significantly lower using the prototype (median 1) than on the control elbows (median 2, p = 0.009). The number of attempts was not correlated with the body weight neither in the case of experimental (Rs = 0.18, p = 0.532) nor control elbows (Rs = 0.13, p = 0.642). We conclude that the used prototype seems to be helpful in elbow joint arthroscopy. Full article
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