Service Trustworthiness Management in the Internet of Things

A special issue of IoT (ISSN 2624-831X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2022) | Viewed by 3924

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering University of Cagliari, piazza d’Armi, 09123 Cagliari, Italy
Interests: Internet of Things; social networks; inclusive smart cities
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor Assistant
Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering (DIEE), University of Cagliari, Piazza d’Armi, 09123 Cagliari, Italy
Interests: Internet of Things; social networks; energy efficiency; web services

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The Internet of Things (IoT) has become a reality, with billions of devices able to send key information about the physical world and implementing simple actions, which leads to the paradigm of the anytime and anyplace connectivity for anything. The IoT encompasses into the Internet a large number of heterogeneous and pervasive objects, from simple sensors to smartphones: the massive amount of data flowing through the IoT has pushed forward the development of new applications in several domains, such as cars that communicate with the municipality about the status of a smart city, smartphones that share anonymous medical information to prevent epidemics and pandemics, e-health, and the smart building, just to cite a few.

Such future IoT applications are likely developed making use of a service-oriented architecture where each device can play the role of a service provider or a service requester, or both. IoT is moving toward a model where things look for other things to provide composite services for the benefit of human beings (object–object interaction). With such an interaction model, involving different devices, networking standards, and data management strategies, it is essential to understand how the information provided by each object can be processed automatically by any other peer in the system. This clearly cannot disregard the level of trustworthiness of the object providing information and services.

This Special Issue aims at bringing researchers from both academia and industry together to disseminate their recent advances related to the challenges and solutions in building trustful IoT.

Topics of interest include but are not limited to:

  • Trust management in IoT;
  • Modeling and simulation scenario of trustful IoT systems;
  • Detection, evaluation, and prevention of trust attacks in IoT application;
  • Trusted IoT application;
  • Trust management method and technology for social IoT;
  • Trusted architectures, algorithms, and protocols for IoT;
  • Definition and assessment of trust level for IoT
  • Interaction design for IoT;
  • Real case studies of trust management in the IoT.

Dr. Michele Nitti
Guest Editor
Mr. Claudio Marche
Guest Editor Assistant

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. IoT is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Internet of Things (IoT)
  • Trustworthiness management
  • IoT applications
  • Trusted IoT ecosystem
  • Trustworthiness attack
  • Trustworthy information

Published Papers (1 paper)

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11 pages, 740 KiB  
Article
Can We Trust Trust Management Systems?
by Claudio Marche and Michele Nitti
IoT 2022, 3(2), 262-272; https://doi.org/10.3390/iot3020015 - 23 Mar 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 3025
Abstract
The Internet of Things is enriching our life with an ecosystem of interconnected devices. Object cooperation allows us to develop complex applications in which each node contributes one or more services. Therefore, the information moves from a provider to a requester node in [...] Read more.
The Internet of Things is enriching our life with an ecosystem of interconnected devices. Object cooperation allows us to develop complex applications in which each node contributes one or more services. Therefore, the information moves from a provider to a requester node in a peer-to-peer network. In that scenario, trust management systems (TMSs) have been developed to prevent the manipulation of data by unauthorized entities and guarantee the detection of malicious behaviour. The community concentrates effort on designing complex trust techniques to increase their effectiveness; however, two strong assumptions have been overlooked. First, nodes could provide the wrong services due to malicious behaviours or malfunctions and insufficient accuracy. Second, the requester nodes usually cannot evaluate the received service perfectly. For this reason, a trust system should distinguish attackers from objects with poor performance and consider service evaluation errors. Simulation results prove that advanced trust algorithms are unnecessary for such scenarios with these deficiencies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Service Trustworthiness Management in the Internet of Things)
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