Next Issue
Volume 2, December
Previous Issue
Volume 2, June
 
 

Physiologia, Volume 2, Issue 3 (September 2022) – 6 articles

  • Issues are regarded as officially published after their release is announced to the table of contents alert mailing list.
  • You may sign up for e-mail alerts to receive table of contents of newly released issues.
  • PDF is the official format for papers published in both, html and pdf forms. To view the papers in pdf format, click on the "PDF Full-text" link, and use the free Adobe Reader to open them.
Order results
Result details
Section
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:
12 pages, 1120 KiB  
Article
Evaluation of the Efficacy of Cryopreserved Human Umbilical Cord Tissue Allografts to Augment Functional and Pain Outcome Measures in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis: An Observational Data Collection Study
Physiologia 2022, 2(3), 109-120; https://doi.org/10.3390/physiologia2030010 - 19 Sep 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2616
Abstract
The primary objective of this study is to report the initial efficacy data observed with the use of cryopreserved human umbilical tissue allografts for supplementation in patients with symptomatic degeneration of load-bearing articular cartilage in the knee joint. Our primary endpoints were pain, [...] Read more.
The primary objective of this study is to report the initial efficacy data observed with the use of cryopreserved human umbilical tissue allografts for supplementation in patients with symptomatic degeneration of load-bearing articular cartilage in the knee joint. Our primary endpoints were pain, stiffness, and functional recovery scores. In this ongoing study, 55 participants (age 56–93 years) received a single Wharton’s jelly tissue allograft application. The study dose consisted of 150 mg of Wharton’s jelly allograft suspended in approximately 2 mL of sterile sodium chloride 0.9% solution (normal saline). Each study knee application was performed under ultrasound guidance in a physician’s office. The research methodology consisted of Numeric Pain Rating Scale (NPRS) scores and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) subsection scores including pain, stiffness, and physical function. Study enrollment consisted of 55 patients followed for a post-application duration of 90 days. No adverse events or adverse reactions were reported. The results demonstrated statistically significant improvements of NPRS and WOMAC in initial versus 90-day examination. The data represent Wharton’s jelly tissue allograft applications are safe, non-surgical, and efficacious for patients with symptomatic osteoarthritis of the knee. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Human Physiology)
Show Figures

Figure 1

15 pages, 5143 KiB  
Article
Investigation of Possible Effects of Wearing Exoskeletons during Welding on Heart Rate
Physiologia 2022, 2(3), 94-108; https://doi.org/10.3390/physiologia2030009 - 02 Sep 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1279
Abstract
This study aims to investigate the possible effects of wearing exoskeletons during welding on heart rate. Additionally, the validity of a measuring instrument for determining acute heart rate is to be assessed. N = 15 young healthy subjects with welding experience took part [...] Read more.
This study aims to investigate the possible effects of wearing exoskeletons during welding on heart rate. Additionally, the validity of a measuring instrument for determining acute heart rate is to be assessed. N = 15 young healthy subjects with welding experience took part in the study. The study design defines a one-hour workflow that abstracts welding and grinding tasks. The sequence is based on the internationally recognized standard DIN EN ISO 9606-1 and reproduces authentic work sequences in constrained body positions. Each subject completed the workflow once with and once without an exoskeleton. Recorded measures were the heart rates measured by a wrist-worn smartwatch and by Impedance Cardiography (ICG). The average heart rate shows no statistically significant differences in the measurement series with and without exoskeletons. The temporal variation of the heart rate shows a statistically significant influence of wearing exoskeletons and provides a moderate to strong effect, corresponding to a Cohens d of d = 0.78. Only 28.57% of all data series obtained with a smartwatch were equivalent to ICG-data after analysis with t-test, Pearson’s correlation, and orthogonal regression. Using averaged heart rates to assess exoskeleton effects is not a suitable measure. A trend analysis using linear regression shows moderate to strong statistically significant effects in the time course of heart rates and provides an approach to evaluate exoskeleton-induced effects. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

14 pages, 1860 KiB  
Article
Mitochondrial Effects, DNA Damage, and Antioxidant Enzyme Activity in Cryopreserved Human Sperm Samples: A Pilot Study
Physiologia 2022, 2(3), 80-93; https://doi.org/10.3390/physiologia2030008 - 23 Aug 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1844
Abstract
This study aimed to evaluate the impact of a vapor freezing protocol on antioxidant enzyme activity (superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione reductase (GR)), sperm with active mitochondria, DNA damage, and spermatic parameters. Twenty-six semen samples from men undergoing infertility investigation were cryopreserved in [...] Read more.
This study aimed to evaluate the impact of a vapor freezing protocol on antioxidant enzyme activity (superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione reductase (GR)), sperm with active mitochondria, DNA damage, and spermatic parameters. Twenty-six semen samples from men undergoing infertility investigation were cryopreserved in liquid nitrogen (LN) vapors and plunged into LN, with (method A) and without (method B) a commercial sperm freezing medium (SFM) and inherent removal with a sperm preparation medium (SPM). Most parameters were assessed before and after freezing, except for SOD and GR activity, which were only assessed after freezing. Although method A promoted better results than method B, the percentage of spermatozoa with active mitochondria, motility, vitality, and normal morphology decreased significantly. DNA damage (determined by comet assay) increased similarly with both methods, but the percentage of spermatozoa with fragmented DNA (by TUNEL assay) remained similar to fresh values when method A was applied. GR activity was higher and SOD activity lower with method A. The addition of SFM coupled with the sperm wash with SPM seems essential to preserve the quality of most of the analyzed spermatic parameters and active mitochondria. The detrimental effects promoted by freezing were shown to depend on the quality of the fresh semen, according to correlation coefficients. Interestingly, thawed samples of both methods shared similar DNA damage. These results highlight the need to find more effective protocols, especially for the freezing of low-quality semen samples. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Human Physiology)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

14 pages, 618 KiB  
Review
Pathophysiology of Placenta in Antiphospholipid Syndrome
Physiologia 2022, 2(3), 66-79; https://doi.org/10.3390/physiologia2030007 - 17 Aug 2022
Viewed by 2381
Abstract
Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disorder characterized by clinical manifestations caused by arterial or venous thrombosis and pregnancy conditions such as recurrent miscarriage, fetal death, or premature birth in the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies. The obstetrical manifestations are strongly related to the [...] Read more.
Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disorder characterized by clinical manifestations caused by arterial or venous thrombosis and pregnancy conditions such as recurrent miscarriage, fetal death, or premature birth in the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies. The obstetrical manifestations are strongly related to the placental alterations. The aim of this review is to summarize the latest data on pathophysiology of obstetrical APS, emphasizing the disturbance of the placentation process. Due to a lack of extravillous trophoblasts to properly reconstruct the spiral arteries, APS causes hypoxic or ischemic injury or high-speed blood flow that damages the placenta. This results in decreased or interrupted maternal blood flow to the placenta and a lack of nutrients for the fetus. Antiphospholipid antibodies can lower the proliferation and infiltration of the extravillous trophoblasts. The placental mal-perfusion causes the release of antiangiogenic substances such as soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 and soluble endoglin. Placental growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) may be sequestered by sFlt1 and blocked from binding to trophoblast and endothelial cell VEGF receptors, inhibiting their proangiogenic effects. Preeclampsia is the clinical result from a lack of angiogenic factors needed for endothelial vascular homeostasis due to an excess of sFlt1 in the maternal circulation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Human Physiology)
Show Figures

Figure 1

11 pages, 275 KiB  
Review
Physiological Stress as Risk Factor for Hypersensitivity to Contrast Media: A Narrative Review of the Literature and a Proposal of Psychophysiological Tools for Its Detection
Physiologia 2022, 2(3), 55-65; https://doi.org/10.3390/physiologia2030006 - 20 Jul 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2160
Abstract
The use of contrast media in clinical diagnostic practice has increased significantly in recent years, accompanied by an increase in adverse reactions. These are the fleeting symptoms most complained about by patients: Flushing of the face, feeling of nausea, and heat lasting a [...] Read more.
The use of contrast media in clinical diagnostic practice has increased significantly in recent years, accompanied by an increase in adverse reactions. These are the fleeting symptoms most complained about by patients: Flushing of the face, feeling of nausea, and heat lasting a few seconds, considered side effects related to the drug. Hypersensitivity reactions are rarer but dangerous and are driven by the immune system. To ensure the optimal management of adverse reactions to iodinated contrast media, various types of health specialists, such as radiologists, are looking into how to deal with the problem. While there are many suggestions in the scientific literature on what to do in the case of important reactions during or after radiological examination, unfortunately, there are no studies on primary and secondary prevention and, in particular, on psychophysical and psychophysiological influences. Some inferences could be made by observing the studies about psychophysiological stress and immune-inflammatory processes of allergies. The few studies in the literature on the analysis of processes affecting both psychophysiological stress and allergic responses have been analyzed. Finally, stress measurement methods are proposed that can highlight “hypersensitive” people with physiological characteristics capable of exacerbating or accentuating an allergic reaction to contrast media. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Human Physiology)
9 pages, 436 KiB  
Article
Effect of Ingestion of Ice Slurry on the Sleep Quality of Rugby Union Players in the Summer Season
Physiologia 2022, 2(3), 46-54; https://doi.org/10.3390/physiologia2030005 - 05 Jul 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1627
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of ingestion of ice slurry before bedtime on the sleep quality of rugby union players in the summer season. Thirteen healthy male university rugby union players volunteered for this study. The participants ingested [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of ingestion of ice slurry before bedtime on the sleep quality of rugby union players in the summer season. Thirteen healthy male university rugby union players volunteered for this study. The participants ingested either ice slurry or a room-temperature beverage (control) 30 min before bedtime. A wearable activity-based sleep monitor was used to analyze objective sleep parameters, and the subjective sleep scores were assessed using the Oguri–Shirakawa–Azumi Sleep Inventory, middle-aged and aged version (OSA-MA). No differences in the amount or efficiency of sleep were observed between the ice slurry/control beverage conditions. Significant shortening of the sleep latency was observed in the ice slurry condition as compared with the control beverage condition. Moreover, significant improvement of the subjective sleep score for “feeling refreshed” on the OSA-MA was observed in the ice slurry condition. There were no significant differences in the other subjective sleep scores between the two conditions. The results suggest that ice slurry ingestion before bedtime may improve the latency of sleep onset, accelerate recovery from fatigue, and be useful as a sleep improvement strategy in rugby union players engaging in exercises during the summer season. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Previous Issue
Next Issue
Back to TopTop