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J. Ageing Longev., Volume 4, Issue 2 (June 2024) – 4 articles

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36 pages, 621 KiB  
Review
Outcomes and Characteristics of Interdisciplinary Self-Management Interventions for Older Adults Living with Chronic Pain: Insights from a Scoping Review
by Samuel Turcotte, Marie-Ève Lapointe, Carolann Shea, Jacqueline Rousseau, Julie Masse, Johanne Higgins, Pierre Rainville, David Lussier, François Dubé, Catherine Genest, Kami Sarimanukoglu, Lucile Agarrat, Maria Varganici and Johanne Filiatrault
J. Ageing Longev. 2024, 4(2), 83-118; https://doi.org/10.3390/jal4020007 - 3 May 2024
Viewed by 537
Abstract
Introduction: Up to 50% of community-dwelling older adults report living with some chronic pain that interferes with their daily functioning and leads to disabilities. Hence, it is crucial to provide these individuals with strategies to effectively manage pain. An interdisciplinary approach is warranted [...] Read more.
Introduction: Up to 50% of community-dwelling older adults report living with some chronic pain that interferes with their daily functioning and leads to disabilities. Hence, it is crucial to provide these individuals with strategies to effectively manage pain. An interdisciplinary approach is warranted considering the numerous factors contributing to pain among older adults. Although several studies have been conducted on various interdisciplinary pain self-management programs, little effort has been made to synthesize knowledge about such programs for older adults. Objective: The objective of this review was to synthesize the characteristics and effects of interdisciplinary chronic pain self-management interventions targeting community-dwelling older adults. Methods: A scoping review was conducted following the steps recommended by Arksey and O’Malley (2005) and Levac et al. (2010). Keyword searches were performed in MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library. Results: Sixty-six articles were included. Most interventions were based on a cognitive-behavioral group approach and used a combination of modalities, including education and training on the use of self-management strategies. The professionals most frequently involved in group interventions were psychologists, physiotherapists, and occupational therapists. Several benefits of these programs have been reported concerning pain intensity, independence in daily functioning, mental health, and quality of life. Conclusions: Interdisciplinary chronic pain self-management programs appear promising in guiding clinical and rehabilitation interventions for older adults living with chronic pain. Full article
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11 pages, 534 KiB  
Article
‘Successful Ageing’ Needs a Future: Older Incarcerated Adults’ Views on Ageing in Prison
by Andrea Kenkmann and Christian Ghanem
J. Ageing Longev. 2024, 4(2), 72-82; https://doi.org/10.3390/jal4020006 - 2 May 2024
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Abstract
Demographic changes have led to an increase in older people in prisons. Whereas the rehabilitative process of younger offenders is geared towards their reintegration into the labour market, successful ageing should be a policy aim for older prisoners. This study explores how older [...] Read more.
Demographic changes have led to an increase in older people in prisons. Whereas the rehabilitative process of younger offenders is geared towards their reintegration into the labour market, successful ageing should be a policy aim for older prisoners. This study explores how older incarcerated persons view their ageing. A qualitative study using a written survey with only the single question What does ageing in prison mean to you? was conducted in Bavaria, Germany. A total of 64 prisoners (61 male, 3 female) supplied answers varying in length from a few words to several pages. The thematic analysis revealed that together with health concerns, social relations and everyday activities, the uncertainty of the future was a central focus point for the older adults in prison. The authors propose that a positive vision of the future needs to be included in any model of successful ageing. If successful ageing is used as an aim for older prisoners, more attention needs to be paid to support interventions during and after the release process. Full article
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21 pages, 1623 KiB  
Article
A Mobile App for Chronic Disease Self-Management for Individuals with Low Health Literacy: A Multisite Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial
by Raymond L. Ownby, Michael Simonson, Joshua Caballero, Kamilah Thomas-Purcell, Rosemary Davenport, Donrie Purcell, Victoria Ayala, Juan Gonzalez, Neil Patel and Kofi Kondwani
J. Ageing Longev. 2024, 4(2), 51-71; https://doi.org/10.3390/jal4020005 - 30 Apr 2024
Viewed by 373
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a mobile app designed to improve chronic disease self-management in patients aged 40 years and older with low health literacy and who had at least one chronic health condition, and to assess [...] Read more.
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a mobile app designed to improve chronic disease self-management in patients aged 40 years and older with low health literacy and who had at least one chronic health condition, and to assess the impact of delivering information at different levels of reading difficulty. A randomized controlled trial was completed at two sites. Individuals aged 40 years and older screened for low health literacy who had at least one chronic health condition were randomly assigned to a tailored information multimedia app with text at one of three grade levels. Four primary outcomes were assessed: patient activation, chronic disease self-efficacy, health-related quality of life, and medication adherence. All groups showed overall increases in activation, self-efficacy, and health-related quality of life, but no change in medication adherence. No between-group differences were observed. The mobile app may have been effective in increasing participants’ levels of several psychosocial variables, but this interpretation can only be advanced tentatively in light of the lack of control-experimental group differences. Reading difficulty level was not significantly related to outcomes. Full article
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10 pages, 431 KiB  
Article
The Impact of Financial Pressure on the Association between Employment and Depressive Symptoms for Community-Dwelling Older Adults
by Hiroko Costantini, Takazumi Ono, Nanami Shogaki, Tomoki Tanaka, Weida Lyu, Bo-Kyung Son, Yasuyo Yoshizawa and Katsuya Iijima
J. Ageing Longev. 2024, 4(2), 41-50; https://doi.org/10.3390/jal4020004 - 29 Apr 2024
Viewed by 326
Abstract
Addressing how employment impacts older adults, including their psychological well-being, we contribute to the study of this topic by examining the association between paid work in community-dwelling older adults and their depressive mood, while considering the extent of their financial pressure. Methods: The [...] Read more.
Addressing how employment impacts older adults, including their psychological well-being, we contribute to the study of this topic by examining the association between paid work in community-dwelling older adults and their depressive mood, while considering the extent of their financial pressure. Methods: The data are from the Kashiwa longitudinal cohort study, with a 2014 baseline and a 2016 follow-up. Of the 1308 participants in the 2014 survey, 781 people were included. We conducted binary logistic regression analyses stratified by economic status with regard to the extent of the financial pressure experienced. The independent variable of interest was paid work in 2014, and the dependent variable was the extent of depressive mood (a score of 5 or more on the Geriatric Depression Scale 15) in 2016. Results: Paid work was associated with lower odds of depressive mood among those under financial pressure (odds ratio [OR] 0.46, 95% confidence interval [95%CI] 0.26, 0.81), whereas for those financially stable, we did not find an association between paid work and odds of depressive mood (OR 0.99, [95%CI] 0.26, 2.63). Discussion: We evidence that for older adults under financial pressure, employment supports the maintenance of their psychological well-being. We contribute to the literature by understanding when employment is beneficial for older adults, which is important in developing appropriate older adult employment social policies. Full article
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