Topic Editors

TENECO Research Group, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of La Rioja, Calle San José de Calasanz, 31, Logroño, 26004 La Rioja, Spain
TENECO Research Group, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of La Rioja, Calle San José de Calasanz, 31, Logroño, 26004 La Rioja, Spain
Department of Civil Engineering, University of Porto, 4100 Porto, Portugal

Towards Nearly Zero-Energy Buildings in Mediterranean and Latin American Countries

Abstract submission deadline
31 October 2024
Manuscript submission deadline
31 December 2024
Viewed by
1096

Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

The building sector is responsible for 40% of the energy consumption and 36% of the greenhouse gas emissions in the European Union. Thus, the European Union has established increasing energy savings and efficiency in this sector as a priority through the Energy Performance of Buildings Directive (EPBD), which has been implemented in the different Member States. The EPBD 2010 defined nearly zero-energy buildings (NZEBs) as buildings with very high energy performance, whose low amount of required energy is derived mainly from renewable energy sources. The EPBD 2018 aims to achieve a highly energy-efficient and decarbonised building stock by 2050. In addition, taking into account the high degree of ageing of the existing building stock, the energy renovation of buildings is fundamental for achieving this objective.

This Topic focuses on the achievement of NZEBs in the Member States of the European Union in the Mediterranean. The implications and experiences of implementing the EPBD in these countries can serve as a reference to achieve NZEBs and improve the energy savings and efficiency in the building sector in other countries outside the European Union both in the Mediterranean and Latin America. The main objective of this Topic is to publish the latest research on how to achieve NZEBs in Mediterranean and Latin American countries through energy renovation or new construction and establish the minimum necessary requirements and on what the energy, environmental and economic impacts these actions will have on the building sector. Therefore, this Topic will cover but is not limited to the following topics: definition of NZEBs, improvements in the thermal building regulations, analysis of the building sector and future projections, application of cost-optimal methodologies for the design of renovated and new buildings, energy performance certificates of buildings, energy renovation of buildings, and use of renewable energy sources in buildings.

Prof. Dr. Luis M. López-Ochoa
Dr. Jesús Las-Heras-Casas
Dr. Nuno M. M. Ramos
Topic Editors

Keywords

  • nearly zero-energy building
  • Energy Performance of Buildings Directive
  • thermal building regulation
  • cost-optimal methodology
  • energy performance certificate
  • energy renovation
  • building sector

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Applied Sciences
applsci
2.7 4.5 2011 16.9 Days CHF 2400 Submit
Architecture
architecture
- - 2021 26.4 Days CHF 1000 Submit
Buildings
buildings
3.8 3.1 2011 14.6 Days CHF 2600 Submit
Energies
energies
3.2 5.5 2008 16.1 Days CHF 2600 Submit
Eng
eng
- - 2020 18.7 Days CHF 1200 Submit
Sustainability
sustainability
3.9 5.8 2009 18.8 Days CHF 2400 Submit

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Published Papers (1 paper)

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24 pages, 8540 KiB  
Article
Use of “Glass Curtain” Systems to Improve the Energy Efficiency and Thermal Comfort of Dwellings in a Warm Semi-Arid Mediterranean Climate
Appl. Sci. 2023, 13(24), 13082; https://doi.org/10.3390/app132413082 - 07 Dec 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 693
Abstract
The dry Mediterranean climate (BShs) within a warm semi-arid climate (BSh) is the zone in Europe with the most annual hours of sunlight, and it has a smaller annual temperature variation than most climates. This allows the greenhouse effect caused by windows to [...] Read more.
The dry Mediterranean climate (BShs) within a warm semi-arid climate (BSh) is the zone in Europe with the most annual hours of sunlight, and it has a smaller annual temperature variation than most climates. This allows the greenhouse effect caused by windows to be used to heat dwellings in winter. Balcony frameless retractable glazing systems known as “glass curtain” systems offer the highest proportion of glass and maximum openness in the façade, allowing for maximum sunlight and ventilation. This work studies a glazed terrace with a “glass curtain” in a dwelling on the Spanish Mediterranean coastline. The objective is to quantitatively determine the enhancement of the thermal comfort and energy efficiency of a dwelling using “glass curtain” systems. The modification of several design parameters of the glazed terrace is also analysed. The novelty of this study lies in demonstrating that the use and optimised design of “glass curtain” systems allows us to obtain nearly zero-energy buildings (nZEBs) and thermally comfortable dwellings all year round. The research methods include a comparison of the current thermal performance of the dwelling with and without a “glass curtain” system via on-site measurements. The study also evaluates the influence of modifying design parameters using computer simulations. The results show that “glass curtain” systems increase the indoor temperatures inside the dwelling by about 4 °C in winter and reduce the annual indoor thermal oscillation from more than 16 °C to only 10 °C. Consequently, such systems reduce heating energy needs by almost 60%. Glazed terraces using the proposed design parameters show further improvement regarding thermal comfort and practically eliminate heating and cooling needs. Full article
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