Topic Editors

School of Civil Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090, China
Prof. Dr. Changyong Liu
Key Laboratory of Structures Dynamic Behavior and Control of the Ministry of Education, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090, China
Dr. Shasha Xu
School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Peking University, Beijing, China
Division of Integrative Systems and Design, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong, China
School of Architecture, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090, China
Dr. Ran Feng
Associate Professor, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Shenzhen 518055, China
Dr. Yao Ding
Department of Urban and Architecture, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan

Ideas for Future Cities: Intelligent, Low-Carbon and Healthy

Abstract submission deadline
30 September 2024
Manuscript submission deadline
31 December 2024
Viewed by
2218

Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

Since the development of science and technology in this century has not broken through the glass ceiling, urban development and construction relying on traditional disciplines such as architecture, civil and environmental engineering have also entered a low-speed stage. The question of where modern cities will go in the foreseeable future is worth considering. We believe that future cities will become an intelligent and low-carbon world dedicated to human health. Future cities will be fundamentally redesigned to meet the needs of sustainable development. To reduce carbon emissions, intelligent automated equipment will become the mainstream. To eliminate resource shortages and reduce dependence on fossil fuels, future cities will be dedicated to the development of renewable energy. Therefore, future cities will also become more liveable, which is beneficial to human health. Also, public interaction spaces, green parks, and social spaces will be redesigned to better meet the needs of healthy cities. The future cities will increasingly rely on virtual reality technologies to enhance the efficiency of urban management.

The purpose of this topic is to display innovative ideas for future cities. Furthermore, these ideas are supported by multiple disciplines. We sincerely invite scholars from various fields to present creative and cutting-edge ideas and techniques for the development of future cities. The topics of interest for publication include, but are not limited to, the following: 

  • Future city
  • Intelligent construction
  • Low carbon
  • Healthy
  • Sustainability
  • Land use
  • Green materials
  • 3D printing
  • Renewable energies
  • Urban renewal

Dr. Shan Gao
Prof. Dr. Changyong Liu
Dr. Shasha Xu
Dr. Changying Xiang
Dr. Lulu Chen
Dr. Ran Feng
Dr. Yao Ding
Topic Editors

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Applied Sciences
applsci
2.7 4.5 2011 16.9 Days CHF 2400 Submit
Buildings
buildings
3.8 3.1 2011 14.6 Days CHF 2600 Submit
Energies
energies
3.2 5.5 2008 16.1 Days CHF 2600 Submit
Land
land
3.9 3.7 2012 14.8 Days CHF 2600 Submit
Materials
materials
3.4 5.2 2008 13.9 Days CHF 2600 Submit
Sustainability
sustainability
3.9 5.8 2009 18.8 Days CHF 2400 Submit
Water
water
3.4 5.5 2009 16.5 Days CHF 2600 Submit

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Published Papers (2 papers)

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19 pages, 4503 KiB  
Article
The Design of Façade-Integrated Vertical Greenery to Mitigate the Impacts of Extreme Weather: A Case Study from Hong Kong
Buildings 2023, 13(11), 2865; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings13112865 - 16 Nov 2023
Viewed by 695
Abstract
Vertical greenery not only helps to cool the surfaces of buildings but, more importantly, it can also mitigate the Urban Heat Island effect. The growth of vertical greenery is highly dependent on ongoing maintenance, such as irrigation. Wind-driven rain serves as a natural [...] Read more.
Vertical greenery not only helps to cool the surfaces of buildings but, more importantly, it can also mitigate the Urban Heat Island effect. The growth of vertical greenery is highly dependent on ongoing maintenance, such as irrigation. Wind-driven rain serves as a natural source of irrigation for vertical greenery. Wind-driven rain simulation was conducted on a typical high-density and high-rise case in Hong Kong to first classify the wind-driven rain harvesting potential on the façade with very high, high, moderate, low, and very low levels. Then, Scenario 1 (very high potential), Scenario 2 (very high + high potential), and Scenario 3 (very high + high + moderate potential) regarding vertical greenery in locations with three levels of wind-driven rain harvesting potential were simulated in ENVI-met to assess its Urban Heat Island mitigation effect. The maximum temperature reduction on the street occurs between 12 p.m. and 3 p.m., indicating the greatest mitigation of the Urban Heat Island effect. Scenario 1, Scenario 2, and Scenario 3 achieve a maximum temperature reduction of 0.76 °C, 0.88 °C, and 1.06 °C, respectively, during this time period. Full article
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13 pages, 1361 KiB  
Article
Embodied Carbon in Australian Residential Houses: A Preliminary Study
Buildings 2023, 13(10), 2559; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings13102559 - 10 Oct 2023
Viewed by 753
Abstract
Embodied carbon is a buzzword in the construction industry. Australia is committed to achieving Net Zero 2050 targets, and minimizing embodied carbon (EC) is inevitable. Owing to the population growth, there will be a significant demand for residential construction. Therefore, the material consumption [...] Read more.
Embodied carbon is a buzzword in the construction industry. Australia is committed to achieving Net Zero 2050 targets, and minimizing embodied carbon (EC) is inevitable. Owing to the population growth, there will be a significant demand for residential construction. Therefore, the material consumption in residential construction should be evaluated and proper strategies should be in place to minimize EC. The aim of this research is to undertake a preliminary study of EC in the Australian residential sector, with an emphasis on new residential home construction. This research presents a preliminary study on EC in residential buildings in Australia. Three case study residential buildings were used in this study. All three case studies are single -story residential units, with a gross floor area between 200 and 240 m2. One Click LCA software was used to calculate the EC. The EC of three case study residential homes is between 193 and 233 kgCO2e/m2. Based on the findings of this study, ‘other structures and materials’ contribute to a large amount of EC in residential construction. Concrete and aluminum are considered significant contributors to EC. Therefore, it is vital to either introduce low-EC material to replace aluminum windows or introduce various design options to minimize the use of aluminum in windows. There are various sustainable concretes available with low EC. It is essential to explore these low-EC concretes in residential homes as well. This research identifies the importance of adopting strategies to reduce the carbon impact from other sources, including concrete. It is also essential to consider the EC through transportation related to construction and promote locally sourced building materials in residential construction. Therefore, the results of this research indicate the necessity of reducing raw material consumption in Australian residential construction by implementing approaches such as a circular economy in order to circulate building materials throughout the construction supply chain and reduce raw material extraction. Full article
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