Topic Editors

Department of Evolutionary Psychology and Education, Faculty of Education of Bilbao, University of the Basque Country, 48940 Leioa, Spain
Department of Developmental and Educational Psychology, University of the Basque Country, 48940 Leioa, Spain
Dr. Maitane Picaza Gorrotchategi
Faculty of Education, University of the Basque Country, 48940 Leioa, Spain
Department Didactics and School Organisation, University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, 48940 Leioa, Spain
Dr. Israel Alonso
Department Didactics, School Organisation, University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, 48940 Leioa, Spain

Global Mental Health Trends

Abstract submission deadline
20 September 2024
Manuscript submission deadline
20 November 2024
Viewed by
3077

Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent years, the mental health of the general population, and young people in particular, has deteriorated considerably. It is therefore important to advance in the promotion of mental health in different populations and to know the advances that have been made in terms of mental health improvement programs, mental health promotion, and mental health situations. That is why we welcome different articles that gather information about mental health in different populations, mental health promotion that is being carried out, the programs that are being applied, and the future expectations of the different countries.

Dr. Naiara Ozamiz-Etxebarria
Dr. Nahia Idoiaga-Mondragon
Dr. Maitane Picaza Gorrotchategi
Dr. Idoia Legorburu Fernandez
Dr. Israel Alonso
Topic Editors

Keywords

  • mental health
  • prevention
  • promotion
  • intervention
  • treatment
  • psychotherapy
  • mental health programs
  • youth
  • children
  • adults
  • old people

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Behavioral Sciences
behavsci
2.6 3.0 2011 21.5 Days CHF 2200 Submit
European Journal of Investigation in Health, Psychology and Education
ejihpe
3.2 3.5 2011 20.1 Days CHF 1400 Submit
Healthcare
healthcare
2.8 2.7 2013 19.5 Days CHF 2700 Submit
Social Sciences
socsci
1.7 3.2 2012 27.7 Days CHF 1800 Submit
Sustainability
sustainability
3.9 5.8 2009 18.8 Days CHF 2400 Submit

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Published Papers (5 papers)

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13 pages, 240 KiB  
Article
NIMBYism and Strategies for Coping with Managing Protests during the Establishment of Community Mental Health Facilities in Taiwan: Insights from Frontline Healthcare Professionals
Healthcare 2024, 12(4), 484; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare12040484 - 17 Feb 2024
Viewed by 288
Abstract
Taiwanese community mental health facilities encounter opposition/resistance from residents, commonly known as “Not-In-My-Backyard” (NIMBYism). This study investigated NIMBYism during the establishment of such facilities and how they respond to such resistance. A qualitative study through semi-structured interviews was used to obtain purposively sampled [...] Read more.
Taiwanese community mental health facilities encounter opposition/resistance from residents, commonly known as “Not-In-My-Backyard” (NIMBYism). This study investigated NIMBYism during the establishment of such facilities and how they respond to such resistance. A qualitative study through semi-structured interviews was used to obtain purposively sampled data. Fifteen frontline healthcare professionals from community mental health facilities in Taiwan were interviewed individually, using an organizational analysis structure. Data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Two themes: “Reasons for Resident Resistance” and “Institutional Response Strategies”, two categories, and 11 subcategories emerged. The findings demonstrated the following: (1) Reasons behind residents’ resistance toward establishing community mental health facilities are diverse. (2) Communities lack understanding regarding people with mental disorders, leading to irrational beliefs. (3) Fear and negative perceptions toward people with mental disorders exist. (4) Strategies employed by the facilities include providing community services to foster amicable relationships, organizing community outreaches, training people with mental disorders within communities, nurturing neighborhood connections, establishing and sustaining friendships within communities, inviting residents to visit community mental health facilities or introducing the facilities to communities, and leveraging governmental support. The government should adopt regulations or laws to reduce discrimination, promote human rights, and legislate to demarcate the use of community land. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Global Mental Health Trends)
10 pages, 235 KiB  
Article
Personality Risk Factors for Vape Use amongst Young Adults and Its Consequences for Sleep and Mental Health
Healthcare 2024, 12(4), 423; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare12040423 - 06 Feb 2024
Viewed by 480
Abstract
(1) Background: The surge in vape (e-cigarette) use among young adults is concerning, as there is limited knowledge about risk factors and health consequences. This study explores the personality traits linked to vape use, and associations between vaping and chronotype, sleep quality, and [...] Read more.
(1) Background: The surge in vape (e-cigarette) use among young adults is concerning, as there is limited knowledge about risk factors and health consequences. This study explores the personality traits linked to vape use, and associations between vaping and chronotype, sleep quality, and mental health, among young adults. (2) Methods: 316 participants, aged 18–25, completed measurements of mindfulness, rumination, self-compassion, anxiety/depression, chronotype, and sleep quality. (3) Results: the vape user group scored significantly lower on mindfulness, higher on rumination, and lower on self-compassion. Vape users were more likely to be evening types and had significantly lower sleep quality and higher anxiety symptoms, as well as higher alcohol use and loneliness (at trend) (4) Conclusions: These novel findings enhance our understanding of what might predispose young adults to vaping and the potential impact on their mental health and sleep quality. Findings point to specific cognitive/personality traits as vaping risk factors, which could inform intervention strategies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Global Mental Health Trends)
20 pages, 476 KiB  
Review
Factors Associated with Revictimization in Intimate Partner Violence: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
Behav. Sci. 2024, 14(2), 103; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs14020103 - 30 Jan 2024
Viewed by 586
Abstract
This study conducted a meta-analysis to identify the primary risk and protective factors associated with the revictimization in intimate partner violence against women (IPVAW). Out of 2382 studies initially identified in eight databases, 22 studies met the inclusion criteria and provided the necessary [...] Read more.
This study conducted a meta-analysis to identify the primary risk and protective factors associated with the revictimization in intimate partner violence against women (IPVAW). Out of 2382 studies initially identified in eight databases, 22 studies met the inclusion criteria and provided the necessary data for calculating pooled effect sizes. The analysis focused on non-manipulative quantitative studies examining revictimization in heterosexual women of legal age. Separate statistical analyses were performed for prospective and retrospective studies, resulting in findings related to 14 variables. The Metafor package in RStudio was used with a random-effects model. The meta-analysis revealed that childhood abuse was the most strongly associated risk factor for revictimization, while belonging to a white ethnicity was the most prominent protective factor. Other significant risk factors included alcohol and drug use, recent physical violence, severity of violence, and PTSD symptomatology. The study also found that older age was a protective factor in prospective studies. The consistency of results across different study designs and sensitivity analyses further supported the robustness of the findings. It is important to note that the existing literature on revictimization in women facing intimate partner violence is limited and exhibits significant heterogeneity in terms of methodology and conceptual frameworks. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Global Mental Health Trends)
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15 pages, 1860 KiB  
Article
Mid-Term and Long-Lasting Psycho–Cognitive Benefits of Bidomain Training Intervention in Elderly Individuals with Mild Cognitive Impairment
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2024, 14(2), 284-298; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe14020019 - 26 Jan 2024
Viewed by 447
Abstract
Background: This study investigated whether combining simultaneous physical and cognitive training yields superior cognitive outcomes compared with aerobic training alone in individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and whether these benefits persist after four weeks of detraining. Methods: Forty-four people with MCI (11 [...] Read more.
Background: This study investigated whether combining simultaneous physical and cognitive training yields superior cognitive outcomes compared with aerobic training alone in individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and whether these benefits persist after four weeks of detraining. Methods: Forty-four people with MCI (11 males and 33 females) aged 65 to 75 years were randomly assigned to an 8-week, twice-weekly program of either aerobic training (AT group, n = 15), aerobic training combined with cognitive games (ACT group, n = 15), or simply reading for controls (CG group, n = 14). Selective attention (Stroop), problem-solving (Hanoi Tower), and working memory (Digit Span) tasks were used to assess cognitive performances at baseline, in the 4th (W4) and 8th weeks (W8) of training, and after 4 weeks of rest (W12). Results: Both training interventions induced beneficial effects on all tested cognitive performance at W4 (except for the number of moves in the Hanoi tower task) and W8 (all p <0.001), with the ACT group exhibiting a more pronounced positive impact than the AT group (p < 0.05). This advantage was specifically observed at W8 in tasks such as the Stroop and Tower of Hanoi (% gain ≈40% vs. ≈30% for ACT and AT, respectively) and the digit span test (% gain ≈13% vs. ≈10% for ACT and AT, respectively). These cognitive improvements in both groups, with the greater ones in ACT, persisted even after four weeks of detraining, as evidenced by the absence of a significant difference between W8 and W12 (p > 0.05). Concerning neuropsychological assessments, comparable beneficial effects were recorded following both training regimens (all p < 0.05 from pre- to post-intervention). The control group did not show any significant improvement in most of the cognitive tasks. Conclusions: The greater mid-term and long-lasting effects of combined simultaneous physical–cognitive training underscores its potential as a cost-effective intervention for the prevention and management of cognitive decline. While these results are valuable in guiding optimal physical and mental activity recommendations for adults with MCI, further neurophysiological-based studies are essential to offer robust support and deepen our understanding of the mechanisms underlying these promising findings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Global Mental Health Trends)
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14 pages, 229 KiB  
Article
Exploring the Operational Status and Challenges of Community-Based Mental Healthcare Centers in Taiwan: A Qualitative Analysis of Healthcare Professionals’ Insights
Healthcare 2024, 12(1), 51; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare12010051 - 25 Dec 2023
Viewed by 679
Abstract
Psychological disorders have become more prevalent in the presence of modernization and societal changes. Community-based mental health is important in healthcare. Taiwan has passed the Mental Health Act, and county governments have established community-based mental healthcare centers. This study aimed to fill the [...] Read more.
Psychological disorders have become more prevalent in the presence of modernization and societal changes. Community-based mental health is important in healthcare. Taiwan has passed the Mental Health Act, and county governments have established community-based mental healthcare centers. This study aimed to fill the research gap regarding the operational status of these centers. A qualitative study design using semi-structured interviews was used to obtain data from a purposive sample. Seventeen healthcare professionals who were front-line workers of a community-based mental healthcare center in Taiwan were interviewed individually. This study uses the organizational analysis structure as the research base. The data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. The theme—“operational status and difficulties”—and two categories with twelve subcategories emerged. The findings demonstrate (1) unclear objectives and imprecisely defined roles, (2) incomplete services provided, an overly defined area, and ineffectiveness, (3) the central government lacking clear objectives and operational strategies, (4) the public being ignorant of mental diseases and the operation of the centers, and (5) the lack of local resources for mental and social welfare. The government should immediately form clear policies to improve community-based mental healthcare, clarify the structure and models, increase resources for the centers, and provide direct services. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Global Mental Health Trends)
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