Topic Editors

School of Agriculture and Environmental Science, University of Southern Queensland, West St., Darling Heights, QLD 4350, Australia
School of Agriculture and Environmental Science, University of Southern Queensland, West St., Darling Heights, QLD 4350, Australia
Neal Finch
School of Agriculture and Environmental Science, University of Southern Queensland, West St., Darling Heights, QLD 4350, Australia

Wildlife Conservation through Sustainable Use

Abstract submission deadline
closed (1 June 2023)
Manuscript submission deadline
closed (31 December 2023)
Viewed by
2593

Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

We welcome submissions on any aspect of the science, theory, and application of sustainable use of wild living terrestrial resources, including vertebrates and plants. Submission of reviews and reports of examples of the successful sustainable use of wildlife is welcome. The conference objectives are to:

  • Report on the ethical and sustainable use (both consumptive and non-consumptive) of wildlife as a conservation tool;
  • Report on the development of alternative strategies and/or models for wildlife conservation;
  • Report on private wildlife conservation efforts that supplement or enhance public conservation efforts;
  • Promote wildlife conservation programs that incorporate beneficial environmental, economic or social outcomes;
  • Re-examine progress made in the field of sustainable use of wildlife over the last 30 years.

To facilitate those objectives, the conference will have the following themes:

  • Sustainable indigenous use of wildlife;
  • Commercial use and trade of wildlife;
  • Non-consumptive use of wildlife;
  • Pest management—use and control of introduced pests and weeds;
  • Animal welfare and human dimensions of sustainable use;
  • Wild resource management;
  • Wildlife policy and regulation;
  • Non-commercial use of wildlife.

Although using wild resources sustainably as a tool for conservation has been widely discussed since at least the 1970s, there has been recent criticism that the idea has not lived up to its promise. This volume will bring together the latest information regarding, and examples of, the successful sustainable use of wild living organisms. It is an opportunity to publicize your work through publication in high-quality, peer-reviewed journals.

Dr. Greg S. Baxter
Dr. Peter Murray
Neal Finch
Topic Editors

Keywords

  • sustainable
  • ethical
  • humane
  • best practice

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Animals
animals
3.0 4.2 2011 18.1 Days CHF 2400
Conservation
conservation
- - 2021 30.5 Days CHF 1000

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Published Papers (2 papers)

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16 pages, 3405 KiB  
Article
Population Genomics of the Critically Endangered Brazilian Merganser
Animals 2023, 13(24), 3759; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani13243759 - 06 Dec 2023
Viewed by 690
Abstract
The Brazilian merganser (Mergus octosetaceus) is one of the most endangered bird species in South America and comprises less than 250 mature individuals in wild environments. This is a species extremely sensitive to environmental disturbances and restricted to a few “pristine” [...] Read more.
The Brazilian merganser (Mergus octosetaceus) is one of the most endangered bird species in South America and comprises less than 250 mature individuals in wild environments. This is a species extremely sensitive to environmental disturbances and restricted to a few “pristine” freshwater habitats in Brazil, and it has been classified as Critically Endangered on the IUCN Red List since 1994. Thus, biological conservation studies are vital to promote adequate management strategies and to avoid the decline of merganser populations. In this context, to understand the evolutionary dynamics and the current genetic diversity of remaining Brazilian merganser populations, we used the “Genotyping by Sequencing” approach to genotype 923 SNPs in 30 individuals from all known areas of occurrence. These populations revealed a low genetic diversity and high inbreeding levels, likely due to the recent population decline associated with habitat loss. Furthermore, it showed a moderate level of genetic differentiation between all populations located in four separated areas of the highly threatened Cerrado biome. The results indicate that urgent actions for the conservation of the species should be accompanied by careful genetic monitoring to allow appropriate in situ and ex situ management to increase the long-term species’ survival in its natural environment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Wildlife Conservation through Sustainable Use)
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12 pages, 1306 KiB  
Article
Adaptive Response to Gillnets Bycatch in a North Sardinia Mediterranean Shag (Gulosus aristotelis desmarestii) Population
Animals 2023, 13(13), 2142; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani13132142 - 29 Jun 2023
Viewed by 809
Abstract
Mediterranean Shag (Gulosus aristotelis desmarestii) is a seabird endemic to the Mediterranean and Black Seas, recently included in the IUCN list of threatened Species. Most of the reproductive colonies are hosted in Sardinia and surrounding islets. Bycatch in fishing nets is [...] Read more.
Mediterranean Shag (Gulosus aristotelis desmarestii) is a seabird endemic to the Mediterranean and Black Seas, recently included in the IUCN list of threatened Species. Most of the reproductive colonies are hosted in Sardinia and surrounding islets. Bycatch in fishing nets is one of the most significant threats for this population. Our work aimed to assess alterations in the sex ratio caused by bycatch and to study the adaptive response of the population to a skewed adult sex ratio. The sex ratio of Mediterranean Shags found drowned in the gillnets near the colonies and that of the nestlings of the Corcelli (northeast Sardinia) colony was determined using the sex-linked polymorphism of the gene Chromobox-Helicase-DNA-binding 1. The data of the shags found drowned in gillnets evidenced a high mortality rate (83.3%; p < 0.001) and a larger size of males (35% heavier than females, p < 0.05) compared to females, supporting the theory that heavier individuals are able to forage at great depths. With 64.8% of the nestlings being male, the sex ratio of nestlings was statistically different from parity (p < 0.05). Furthermore, it was related to the brood size. In one- and two-chick broods, 73% and 70% of nestlings, respectively, were males, while in three-chick broods, only 33% were males. Our data identify the higher rate of male shags drowned in gillnets as a factor causing an alteration of the sex ratio in the Mediterranean Shag population. According to the Sex Allocation Theory, an adaptive adjustment of sex made by adult females restores the Mendelian sex ratio in the population. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Wildlife Conservation through Sustainable Use)
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