Topic Editors

Prof. Dr. Chenglu Wang
Department of Marketing, University of New Haven, West Haven, CT 06516, USA
Prof. Dr. Henry F. L. Chung
School of Communication, Journalism and Marketing, Massey Business School, Massey University, Auckland 0632, New Zealand
Prof. Dr. Jin Sun
Department of Marketing, University of International Business and Economics, Beijing 10002, China
Prof. Dr. Yongge Niu
Business School, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064, China
Dr. Liying Zhou
School of Business Administration, Guizhou University of Finance and Economics, Guiyang 550025, China

Consumer Psychology and Business Applications

Abstract submission deadline
31 August 2024
Manuscript submission deadline
31 October 2024
Viewed by
6014

Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

Consumer psychology, drawing on multi-disciplines including social psychology, marketing, behavioral economics, and other areas, is a science that understands consumers’ perceptions, beliefs, feelings, motivations, and thoughts as well as personality and social factors that influence their purchasing and consumption behavior. In the digital era, platforms change the consumer’s journey because consumers actively engage in the value co-creation process through social media platforms and omni-channels (Lim, 2023, Wang, 2021). Thus, interactive marketing becomes the new normal in contemporary consumer participatory culture with a wide application in business practices (Lim, 2023, Wang, 2023). Such knowledge helps marketers to develop marketing strategies, including product design and development, integrative and interactive marketing communications, and consumer activities on social media platforms.

Since every individual is a consumer, consumer psychology can be applied in every aspect of human life and every stage of the consumption process. Therefore, this special topic emphasizes the managerial implications and practical applications of psychological principles to business practices. We welcome submissions, including empirical, methodological, or conceptual papers that demonstrate innovative thinking, rigorous methodologies, and insightful contributions (Wang, 2022) with a focus on real-world decision making and practical implications. In particular, the focus of this special topic is on the application of consumer psychology (consumer perception, attitude, emotion and motivation, personality and psychographics, etc.) in the following suggested (but limited) topic areas:

  • Consumer behavior in the digital age;
  • E-commerce and E-word of mouth;
  • Consumer experience and experiential marketing;
  • Behavioral economics and decision making;
  • Applied behavior analysis and predictive campaign analytics;
  • Social media and interactive marketing;
  • Value-concretion for brand management;
  • Brand extension and new branding strategies;
  • Artificial intelligence and generative ChatGPT application in business;
  • Big data, predictive analysis, and customization;
  • Virtual reality and augmented reality in marketing applications;
  • Smart technology and Internet of Things in consumer life and business applications;
  • Green marketing and sustainable consumption;
  • Collaborative consumption in shared economy;
  • Consumer experience and new retailing strategies;
  • Positive psychology and social marketing applications;
  • Consumer happiness and well-being;
  • Brand community and fandom management;
  • Consumer behavior in private vs. public situations;
  • Social influences and peer impact on consumer behavior;
  • Brand loyalty, brand engagement, and brand co-creation;
  • New media and communications;
  • Livestreaming and short-video marketing campaigns;
  • Key opinion leaders and influencer marketing;
  • Consumer behavior in social media platforms;
  • Consumer involvement and risk taking;
  • Defensive mechanism and consumption;
  • Leisure activities, entertainment, and hedonic consumption;
  • Tourism, hospitality, and travel management;
  • Consumer experience in service industries;
  • Stereotype-based expectations and consumer behavior;
  • Consumer nostalgic feeling and business strategies;
  • Emotions and impulsive consumption;
  • Novelty-seeking behavior and brand switching;
  • Luxury consumption and buying behavior;
  • Fashion-consciousness and fashion marketing management;
  • Organizational and B2B buying behavior;
  • Buying and selling behavior in supply chain management and omni-channel marketing;
  • Advertising and sales promotions;
  • Customer engagement and service management;
  • Emerging consumption patterns of millennials;
  • Social change and consumer values;
  • Product development and design in contemporary consumer culture;
  • International and cross-cultural consumer behavior and consumption patterns;
  • Methodological advancement and applications;
  • Ethical considerations of consumer behavior and business practice.

Prof. Dr. Chenglu Wang
Prof. Dr. Henry F. L. Chung
Prof. Dr. Jin Sun
Prof. Dr. Yongge Niu
Dr. Liying Zhou
Topic Editors

Keywords

  • consumer behavior and business strategies
  • applied psychology in e-commerce and social media platforms
  • predictive analytics and communications
  • buying and selling behaviors in supply chains
  • tourism and travel marketing
  • sustainable consumption
  • consumer happiness and well-being

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Administrative Sciences
admsci
3.0 3.9 2011 20.6 Days CHF 1400 Submit
Behavioral Sciences
behavsci
2.6 3.0 2011 21.5 Days CHF 2200 Submit
Journal of Theoretical and Applied Electronic Commerce Research
jtaer
5.6 6.2 2006 38.4 Days CHF 1000 Submit

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Published Papers (4 papers)

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18 pages, 1108 KiB  
Article
How Social Presence Influences Consumer Well-Being in Live Video Commerce: The Mediating Role of Shopping Enjoyment and the Moderating Role of Familiarity
by Zhen Huang, Xue Yan and Jia Deng
J. Theor. Appl. Electron. Commer. Res. 2024, 19(2), 725-742; https://doi.org/10.3390/jtaer19020039 - 29 Mar 2024
Viewed by 548
Abstract
In recent years, with the rapid development of live-streaming commerce, the social dynamics and psychological impact of such online activities merit further discussion. In this study, we investigate the sensory experiences of viewers watching live streaming and examine how these online experiences influence [...] Read more.
In recent years, with the rapid development of live-streaming commerce, the social dynamics and psychological impact of such online activities merit further discussion. In this study, we investigate the sensory experiences of viewers watching live streaming and examine how these online experiences influence consumer well-being. We developed a conceptual model to understand this mechanism based on the relationship between social presence, shopping enjoyment, familiarity, and consumer well-being. The results of 410 samples indicate that (1) social presence in live-streaming commerce has a significant positive effect on consumer well-being; (2) shopping enjoyment plays a mediating role in the process of social presence predicting consumer well-being; and (3) familiarity plays a moderating role in the second half of the indirect effect of social presence on well-being. This study examines the relationship between social presence and consumer well-being in the context of live-streaming marketing, expanding the research scenario of consumer well-being and clarifying the psychological mechanisms and boundary conditions of the effect of social presence on consumers well-being, which has important implications for online interactive marketing enterprises to enhance social presence and promote consumers long-term well-being. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Consumer Psychology and Business Applications)
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22 pages, 1293 KiB  
Article
Values in Action: Unveiling the Impact of Self-Transcendence and Self-Enhancement on Domestic Consumption Choices
by Zerui Zhao and Lu Huang
Behav. Sci. 2024, 14(3), 203; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs14030203 - 04 Mar 2024
Viewed by 973
Abstract
Against the backdrop of a global emphasis on supporting local businesses and fostering domestic consumption, this study aims to shed light on the influence of personal values on the intentions behind domestic-product consumption. Drawing from the Schwartz value theory, we explore how values [...] Read more.
Against the backdrop of a global emphasis on supporting local businesses and fostering domestic consumption, this study aims to shed light on the influence of personal values on the intentions behind domestic-product consumption. Drawing from the Schwartz value theory, we explore how values of self-transcendence, which embody benevolence and universalism, versus self-enhancement, characterized by a focus on power and achievement, influence consumer behavior. Utilizing data from the Chinese Social Survey (CSS2021) and a survey of 316 participants, structural equation modeling and Dematel analysis are employed to reveal causal relationships between values and consumption intentions. We reveal a dichotomous impact of these value orientations. Self-transcendence values are found to positively affect domestic consumption intentions by enhancing awareness of consequence and ascription of responsibility, thereby strengthening personal norms. In contrast, self-enhancement values tend to impede these intentions. By integrating the Norm-Activation Model (NAM), this study comprehensively uncovers the unique mechanism through which values activate personal norms and subsequently encourage the consumption of domestic products. It enriches the body of research related to values and domestic consumption and offers pertinent recommendations for promoting local enterprises’ products. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Consumer Psychology and Business Applications)
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19 pages, 2221 KiB  
Article
The Impact of Recommendation System on User Satisfaction: A Moderated Mediation Approach
by Xinyue He, Qi Liu and Sunho Jung
J. Theor. Appl. Electron. Commer. Res. 2024, 19(1), 448-466; https://doi.org/10.3390/jtaer19010024 - 27 Feb 2024
Viewed by 937
Abstract
A recommendation system serves as a key factor for improving e-commerce users’ satisfaction by providing them with more accurate and diverse suggestions. A significant body of research has examined the accuracy and diversity of a variety of recommendation systems. However, little is known [...] Read more.
A recommendation system serves as a key factor for improving e-commerce users’ satisfaction by providing them with more accurate and diverse suggestions. A significant body of research has examined the accuracy and diversity of a variety of recommendation systems. However, little is known about the psychological mechanisms through which the recommendation system influences the user satisfaction. Thus, the purpose of this study is to contribute to this gap by examining the mediating and moderating processes underlying this relationship. Drawing from the traditional task-technology fit literature, the study developed a moderated mediation model, simultaneously considering the roles of a user’s feeling state and shopping goal. We adopted a scenario-based experimental approach to test three hypotheses contained in the model. The results showed that there is an interaction effect between shopping goals and types of recommendation (diversity and accuracy) on user satisfaction. Specifically, when a user’s shopping goal aligns with recommendation results in terms of accuracy and diversity, the user satisfaction is enhanced. Furthermore, this study evaluated the mediating role of feeling right and psychological reactance for a better understanding of this interactive relationship. We tested the moderated mediation effect of feeling right and the psychological reactance moderated by the user shopping goal. For goal-directed users, accurate recommendations trigger the activation of feeling right, consequently increasing the user satisfaction. Conversely, when exploratory users face accurate recommendations, they activate psychological reactance, which leads to a reduction in user satisfaction. Finally, we discuss the implications for the study of recommendation systems, and for how marketers/online retailers can implement them to improve online customers’ shopping experience. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Consumer Psychology and Business Applications)
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15 pages, 463 KiB  
Article
Temporal Landmarks and Nostalgic Consumption: The Role of the Need to Belong
by Sigen Song, Min Tian, Qingji Fan and Yi Zhang
Behav. Sci. 2024, 14(2), 123; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs14020123 - 08 Feb 2024
Viewed by 1120
Abstract
This study investigates the influence of temporal landmarks on nostalgic consumption through the mediating role of the need to belong. In particular, the study identifies end landmarks as one of the triggers of landmarks, a phenomenon that has not been studied in the [...] Read more.
This study investigates the influence of temporal landmarks on nostalgic consumption through the mediating role of the need to belong. In particular, the study identifies end landmarks as one of the triggers of landmarks, a phenomenon that has not been studied in the existing nostalgic consumption literature. The research is composed of one pilot study and three experiments to test our research hypotheses. The results show that end temporal landmarks trigger feelings of nostalgia, which leads to nostalgic consumption through the need to belong. This study underscores the mediating role of the need to belong, which plays an important role in leading to nostalgic consumption. Building upon theoretical perspectives on the need to belong, our study enriches the research literature by linking extreme consumer emotional statuses, such as social anxiety, to the consumer need to belong, showing that consumer nostalgic consumption can become a coping strategy that counteracts these negative feelings and helps in regaining connection and supporting social relationship networks. Marketers may use the signs of end temporal landmarks to increase consumers’ nostalgia, which, in turn, will enhance consumers’ need to belong and thus lead to the purchasing and consumption of nostalgic products. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Consumer Psychology and Business Applications)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: The Positive Potential of Deepfake Technology: Evidence from a Study on Female Chinese College Students
Authors: Mengjiao Yin
Affiliation: Taihu University of Wuxi
Abstract: The advent of GAN has given rise to concerns within the academic community regarding the ethics of deepfake advertising. Existing studies on consumer perceptions of generative AI advertisements indicate a negative attitude towards the falsity inherent in deepfake advertising. This study adopts a novel perspective. We recruited 200 female university students from the university to which the authors are affiliated and divided them into three experimental groups and one control group. The participants were invited to either watch or engage in the production of deepfake advertisements themselves. Participants in the "Idol Experimental Group" used photographs of their idols (celebrities and stars they admire) as raw material, those in the "Relatives Experimental Group" used photographs of their loved ones (family members, partners, friends, etc.), and participants in the "Self Experimental Group" used their own photographs. These images were fed into an open-source deepfake model called “roop” to replace the face of the female protagonist in a Chanel(brand name) advertisement with the faces from the provided photographs. Each experimental group was further divided in half, with one subset just providing photographs and observing the resulting deepfake advertisement created by the researchers, and the other subset actively creating the deepfake work under the guidance of the researchers. The control group, however, did not engage in any deepfake activities. After the deepfake operation, participants from all four groups were asked to verbally express their attitude towards the brand for 30 seconds. Their statements were transcribed and subjected to both qualitative and quantitative content analysis. The quantitative analysis primarily measured the length of the output strings within the specified time. The qualitative analysis categorized attitudes into three components—cognition ("I think"), affect ("I feel"), and behavioral intention ("I intend to")—and deconstructed the length of the strings in these three dimensions, assigning weighted scores (behavioral intention > affect > cognition). The total score for each statement was then calculated and statistically compared. The experimental results showed that the experimental groups exhibited a more positive brand attitude compared to the control group. Participants who actively engaged in creating deepfakes demonstrated a more positive brand attitude than those who only observed. Importantly, the positivity of brand attitude was independent of the participants' subjective perceptions of the generative effect (i.e., the perceived realism). The innovative aspect of this study is the application of a controlled experimental method and the development of novel measurement indicators to substantiate the positive effects of deepfake advertising, Amidst a chorus of critical voices towards deepfake technology. Certainly, the study does have its limitations. Due to constraints in computational resources, as well as difficulties inherent in the use of Google Colab for participants, such as issues with internet accessibility and the necessity for a certain level of technical knowledge, it was not feasible to recruit a large number of test subjects in China. This limitation may raise questions regarding the generalizability of the study's findings. However, we believe that as deepfake technology matures, an increasing number of consumer interactive advertisements will be produced and integrated into social media H5 pages or specific features within apps. Therefore, this study holds practical significance for the future landscape of advertising and consumer interaction. Additionally, to maintain stringent control over variables, the present study temporarily excluded the variable of gender, selecting females—who may possess stronger expressive abilities—as subjects for research. The examination of male responses is pending further experimental investigation to supplement the current findings. Our research has progressed beyond the data analysis phase, and if the editorial office deem the study of significance, we are honored to expedite the submission of the full manuscript.

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