Advances in Coastal Hydrodynamics and Morphodynamics

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Oceans and Coastal Zones".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2022) | Viewed by 3966

Special Issue Editors

Department of Hydraulic Engineering, Faculty of Civil Engineering and Geosciences, Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands
Interests: ocean and coastal wave dynamics; coastal morphodynamics; numerical modelling and field experimentation
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Deltares and IHE, Delft, The Netherlands
Interests: coastal and reef wave dynamics; coastal morphodynamics; numerical modelling and laboratory experimentation
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The inspiration for this Special Issue on Advances in Coastal Hydrodynamics and Morphodynamics was the Coastal Dynamics 2021 Conference, held in Delft from 29 June to 2 July 2021. The conference theme was “Shaping the Future of our Coasts”, and scientists and practitioners from all over the world were invited to contribute their insights and research results on how nature and humans are shaping our coasts, now and in the future. Participants were invited to submit their manuscripts for possible publication in this Special Issue. Their submissions are pre-screened by the conference’s local organizing committee. However, we expect that there is a wider interest in submitting manuscripts on these topics and the issue editors are very much welcoming submissions from authors who did not participate in the conference.

Dr. Ad J.H.M. Reniers
Dr. Ap van Dongeren
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Manuscripts will be pre-screened by the Special Issue Editors and forwarded for peer-review to the Journal’s review procedure. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • estuarine and reef hydrodynamics
  • coastal and estuarine morphodynamics
  • dune dynamics
  • risk and hazard assessment
  • climate change impacts
  • nearshore waves and currents
  • observations of coastal hydrodynamics and morphodynamics

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

19 pages, 7422 KiB  
Article
Understanding Coastal Resilience of the Belgian West Coast
Water 2022, 14(13), 2104; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14132104 - 30 Jun 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1836
Abstract
Topobathymetric monitoring carried out in the past 30 years revealed that the amount of sand in the active zone of the Belgian West Coast increased substantially. Correcting for sand works carried out, the rate of natural feeding of the area was estimated to [...] Read more.
Topobathymetric monitoring carried out in the past 30 years revealed that the amount of sand in the active zone of the Belgian West Coast increased substantially. Correcting for sand works carried out, the rate of natural feeding of the area was estimated to be 10 mm/year, which is significantly more than the local sea level rise rate of 2 to 3 mm/year. One concludes that this coastal zone, with a length of ca. 16 km, has shown a natural resilience against sea level rise. The question remains which processes govern this behavior and where natural input of sand to the system occurs. Using available coastal monitoring data for the Belgian coast, as well as a state-of-the-art sand transport model, revealed that different processes drive a cross-shore natural feeding from offshore to the coastline. The spatial distribution of this cross-shore natural feeding is determined by the existence of a gully-sand bank system. The outcome of this research was a conceptual model for the large-scale sand exchange in the study area which is implemented in an 1D coastline model. The most important element in these models was the cross-shore natural feeding of the active zone via a shoreface connected ridge amounting to 95,000 m3/year in the period 2000–2020. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Coastal Hydrodynamics and Morphodynamics)
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21 pages, 1995 KiB  
Article
Roughness Effects of Subaquaeous Ripples and Dunes
Water 2022, 14(13), 2024; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14132024 - 24 Jun 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1622
Abstract
Numerous questions and problems on Earth and questions with respect to other planets arise from morphodynamic processes caused by sediment movements driven by flows of fluids, such as water, air and other gases. A sediment surface opposes the current with a resistance that [...] Read more.
Numerous questions and problems on Earth and questions with respect to other planets arise from morphodynamic processes caused by sediment movements driven by flows of fluids, such as water, air and other gases. A sediment surface opposes the current with a resistance that is determined by its skin or grain roughness. As soon as sand waves, such as ripples and/or dunes, are formed, these bedforms cause a further resistance to the flow, the so-called form roughness. Dependent on the dimensions of the ripples and dunes, the form roughness can be much more pronounced than the skin roughness. The relevant literature provides a large number of solution approaches based on different basic ideas and different result quality. The aim of this paper is a comparative analysis of solution approaches from the literature. For this purpose, 14 approaches to bedform-related friction in the subaqueous case are evaluated using 637 measurements from laboratory and natural settings. We found that all approaches were significantly more accurate for ripples than for dunes. Since this was equally the case for all approaches tested, it is reasonable to assume that this is caused by measurement inaccuracies for dunes in the natural case rather than due to the approaches themselves. The approach of Engelund 1977 proved to be most accurate among all approaches investigated here. It is based on the Borda–Carnot formulation and an additional empirical term. An analytical derivation and justification is provided for this additional term. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Coastal Hydrodynamics and Morphodynamics)
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