Wave–Structure Interaction

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Hydraulics and Hydrodynamics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2022) | Viewed by 6266

Special Issue Editors

State Key Laboratory of Coastal and Offshore Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024, China
Interests: mooring; hydrodynamic; floating structures; hybrid model test method; wind and wave energy; motion control
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
State Key Laboratory of Coastal and Offshore Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024, China
Interests: wave energy; sloshing; computational fluid hydrodynamics; floating structures; wave-ice interaction
State Key Laboratory of Coastal and Offshore Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024, China
Interests: hydrodynamics; nonlinear wave–structure interaction; computational fluid dynamics (CFD); green water; microplastics; ocean renewable energy
School of Hydraulic Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023, China
Interests: wave nonlinearities; wave interaction with coastal and offshore structures; wave and current interactions; freak waves and their interaction with current/wind; wave energy technology; sloshing and its mitigation
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Wave is the most common yet important environmental loading that needs to be considered properly in designing safe and cost-effective ocean and coastal structures. With the rapid development of the industry projects toward more violent and deeper waters, the accurate consideration of wave–structure interaction is experiencing new challenges when attempting to reduce the costs during the process of the design, operation, and maintenance while still ensuring safety. The aim of this Special Issue is to provide an overview of these new challenges arising from a wide range of ocean infrastructures, including the oil and gas platform, renewable energy devices, ships, marine aquaculture facilities, coastal protection structures, etc. Topics will concern new findings and developments for phenomenon mechanism analysis and/or engineering design guidance through numerical simulation or scaled model testing.

Dr. Dongsheng Qiao
Dr. Chongwei Zhang
Dr. Lifen Chen
Prof. Dr. Dezhi Ning
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • wave–structure interaction
  • fixed and floating structures
  • oil and gas platform
  • renewable energy device
  • ships
  • marine aquaculture
  • coastal protection engineering

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

23 pages, 8040 KiB  
Article
Numerical Investigation of Wave Run-Up and Load on Fixed Truncated Cylinder Subjected to Regular Waves Using OpenFOAM
Water 2022, 14(18), 2830; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14182830 - 11 Sep 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1734
Abstract
In the interaction between waves and structures, the maximum wave run-up height on the surface of the structure and the wave field distribution around the cylinder are important factors to be considered in the design of marine structures. In this paper, the open [...] Read more.
In the interaction between waves and structures, the maximum wave run-up height on the surface of the structure and the wave field distribution around the cylinder are important factors to be considered in the design of marine structures. In this paper, the open source software OpenFOAM is used to simulate the wave run-up phenomenon of a truncated cylinder under regular waves by solving the Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes equation. The established numerical model is verified with the experimental data, and the good consistency demonstrates the accuracy in simulating the interaction between waves and fixed truncated cylinders. The numerical results show that the draft of the cylinder under regular waves has little effect on its maximum wave run-up height, but has a significant effect on the horizontal wave force. At the same wave steepness, the radial dimensionless run-up height increases with the increase of scattering parameters ka, where k is the wave number and a is the cylinder radius. The radial run-up height decreases gradually along the radial direction in the upstream, and increases gradually along the radial direction in the downstream. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wave–Structure Interaction)
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15 pages, 2363 KiB  
Article
Numerical Investigation of the Scaling Effects for a Point Absorber
Water 2022, 14(14), 2156; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14142156 - 07 Jul 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1785
Abstract
In order to design and evaluate the behaviour of a numerically optimised wave energy converter (WEC), a recommended procedure is to initially study small scale models in controlled laboratory conditions and then progress further up until the full-scale is reached. At any point, [...] Read more.
In order to design and evaluate the behaviour of a numerically optimised wave energy converter (WEC), a recommended procedure is to initially study small scale models in controlled laboratory conditions and then progress further up until the full-scale is reached. At any point, an important step is the correct selection of the wave theory to model the dynamical behaviour of the WEC. Most authors recommend the selection of a wave theory based on dimensional parameters, which usually does not consider the model scale. In this work, the scale effects for a point absorber are studied based on numerical simulations for three different regular waves conditions. Furthermore, three different wave theories are used to simulate two scales 1:1 and 1:50. The WEC-wave interaction is modelled by using a numerical wave tank implemented in ANSYS-Fluent with a floating object representing the WEC. Results show that the normalised difference between 1:1 and 1:50 models, keeping the same wave theory fluctuate between 30% and 58% of the WEC heave motion and that a wrong selection of the wave theory can lead to differences up to 138% for the same variable. It is also found that the limits for the use of wave theories depends on the particular model and that the range of applicability of different theories can be extended. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wave–Structure Interaction)
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11 pages, 3214 KiB  
Article
Motion Responses of a Berthed Tank under Resonance Coupling Effect of Internal Sloshing and Gap Flow
Water 2021, 13(24), 3625; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13243625 - 17 Dec 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2072
Abstract
The growth of global energy transportation has promoted the rapid increase of large-scale LNG (liquefied natural gas) carriers, and concerns around the safety of LNG ships has attracted significant attention. Such a floating structure is affected by the external wave excitation and internal [...] Read more.
The growth of global energy transportation has promoted the rapid increase of large-scale LNG (liquefied natural gas) carriers, and concerns around the safety of LNG ships has attracted significant attention. Such a floating structure is affected by the external wave excitation and internal liquid sloshing. The interaction between the structure’s motion and the internal sloshing under wave actions may lead to the ship experiencing an unexpected accident. In this research, a hydrodynamic experiment is conducted to investigate the motion responses of a floating tank mooring, both close to and away from a dock. The resonance coupling effect of the internal sloshing and gap flow on the tank’s motion is considered. Based on the measured motion trajectory of the floating tank, the stability and safety of the floating tank are estimated. The results show that the sloshing resonance and narrow gap resonance are beneficial to the stability of the ship. This is helpful for controlling the motion of a berthed ship under wave action with a reasonable selection of the gap distance and the liquid level. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wave–Structure Interaction)
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