Vaccines and Therapeutic Approaches in Dermatological Diseases

A special issue of Vaccines (ISSN 2076-393X). This special issue belongs to the section "Therapeutic Vaccines and Antibody Therapeutics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2024 | Viewed by 1027

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. Skin Cancer Center, Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Allergology, Ruhr-University Bochum, 44791 Bochum, Germany
2. Department of Dermatology and Phlebology, Christian Hospital Unna, 59423 Unna, Germany
Interests: dermato-oncology; melanoma; immunotherapy; vaccination side effects; skin cancer; skin; psoriasis; clinical dermatology; basal cell carcinoma; squamous cell carcinoma; Merkel cell carcinoma
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Guest Editor Assistant
1. International Centre for Hidradenitis Suppurativa/Acne Inversa, Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Allergology, Ruhr-University Bochum, 44791 Bochum, Germany
2. Skin Cancer Center, Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Allergology, Ruhr-University Bochum, 44791 Bochum, Germany
Interests: hidradenitis suppurativa; inflammation; hormones; Merkel cell carcinoma; melanoma; endocrinology; skin cancer; obesity

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Vaccines are being investigated to treat and prevent skin diseases. Vaccines against solid tumors and skin cancer have recently seen increased development. In allergology, vaccines are also successfully used for hyposensitisation against certain allergens. Noninvasive dermal delivery systems make it easy to apply vaccines to different areas of the body. This method can impact clinical treatment due to many skin diseases with therapeutic targets. Currently, most clinical trials for therapies for skin disorders are conducted through intradermal injection. Combining noninvasive delivery techniques with specific vaccine formulation approaches can improve dermal delivery and achieve better therapeutic results. Recent efforts have been made to overcome the skin's barrier function using various smart delivery systems. By addressing these aspects and combining them with a deeper understanding of cell biology, we can improve the design of bioengineered materials to navigate the skin and enhance preventive and therapeutic outcomes.

This Special Issue aims to advance this field by providing a better understanding of how to safely and effectively deliver various vaccine types to target cells. The translational value of preclinical studies can be increased using human-relevant models or studies on human skin explants, tissue-engineered skin models, and human-based tissues grafted onto mice are welcome. We encourage all articles and reviews.

Prof. Dr. Thilo Gambichler
Guest Editor

Dr. Nessr Abu Rached
Guest Editor Assistant

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Vaccines is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • vaccinations
  • vaccines
  • dermatology
  • tumor therapy
  • immune system
  • side effects
  • skin reactions
  • virus vaccines
  • virus
  • bacteria
  • COVID-19 vaccines
  • mRNA
  • vasculitis
  • angioedema
  • anaphylaxis
  • thrombocytopenia
  • B cells
  • T cells
  • vaccination complication
  • safety
  • target structures

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

13 pages, 1036 KiB  
Review
Current Progress in Vaccines against Merkel Cell Carcinoma: A Narrative Review and Update
by Thilo Gambichler, David Schrama, Riina Käpynen, Sera S. Weyer-Fahlbusch, Jürgen C. Becker, Laura Susok, Florian Kreppel and Nessr Abu Rached
Vaccines 2024, 12(5), 533; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines12050533 - 13 May 2024
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Abstract
Merkel cell carcinoma is a rare, aggressive skin cancer that mainly occurs in elderly and immunocompromised patients. Due to the success of immune checkpoint inhibition in MCC, the importance of immunotherapy and vaccines in MCC has increased in recent years. In this article, [...] Read more.
Merkel cell carcinoma is a rare, aggressive skin cancer that mainly occurs in elderly and immunocompromised patients. Due to the success of immune checkpoint inhibition in MCC, the importance of immunotherapy and vaccines in MCC has increased in recent years. In this article, we aim to present the current progress and perspectives in the development of vaccines for this disease. Here, we summarize and discuss the current literature and ongoing clinical trials investigating vaccines against MCC. We identified 10 articles through a PubMed search investigating a vaccine against MCC. From the international clinical trial database Clinical.Trials.gov, we identified nine studies on vaccines for the management of MCC, of which seven are actively recruiting. Most of the identified studies investigating a vaccine against MCC are preclinical or phase 1/2 trials. The vaccine principles mainly included DNA- and (synthetic) peptide-based vaccines, but RNA-based vaccines, oncolytic viruses, and the combination of vaccines and immunotherapy are also under investigation for the treatment of MCC. Although the management of MCC is changing, when compared to times before the approval of immune checkpoint inhibitors, it will still take some time before the first MCC vaccine is ready for approval. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Vaccines and Therapeutic Approaches in Dermatological Diseases)
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