Functional and Molecular Imaging of the Abdomen

A special issue of Tomography (ISSN 2379-139X). This special issue belongs to the section "Abdominal Imaging".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2024 | Viewed by 2384

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
1. F.M. Kirby Research Center for Functional Brain Imaging, Kennedy Krieger Institute, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
2. Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
Interests: molecular and cellular imaging; kidney imaging; CEST contrast; contrast agents

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Tomography is pleased to announce that it will be publishing a Special Topics Issue on “Functional and Molecular Imaging of the Abdomen” to demonstrate the emerging importance of in vivo and ex vivo imaging in basic, preclinical and clinical research of the abdomen.

The intent of this Special Issue is to highlight the utility of novel in vivo and ex vivo imaging approaches for characterizing the structure and function of various parts of the abdomen. The goal is to showcase how basic, preclinical and clinical research has been enriched by the development of functional imaging via the use of MRI, nuclear, optical and ultrasound imaging, including new visualization and image-processing tools. Articles can focus on preclinical imaging of the abdomen, including functional and molecular imaging approaches, as well as animal models; or, they may focus on abdominal imaging of patients. This Special Issue will be technology agnostic and will consider any in vivo or ex vivo imaging technique for characterizing the abdomen. Submissions regarding avant-garde imaging methods that are “on the horizon”, multiscale imaging, multidimensional imaging, organ visualization, and special techniques for integrating and/or processing structural or functional abdominal imaging data are especially encouraged.

Prof. Dr. Michael T. McMahon
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Tomography is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • molecular imaging of abdomen
  • functional imaging of abdomen
  • kidney imaging
  • liver imaging
  • pancreas imaging

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

11 pages, 2349 KiB  
Article
The Additional Role of F18-FDG PET/CT in Characterizing MRI-Diagnosed Tumor Deposits in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer
by Mark J. Roef, Kim van den Berg, Harm J. T. Rutten, Jacobus Burger and Joost Nederend
Tomography 2024, 10(4), 632-642; https://doi.org/10.3390/tomography10040048 - 22 Apr 2024
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Abstract
Rationale: F18-FDG PET/CT may be helpful in baseline staging of patients with high-risk LARC presenting with vascular tumor deposits (TDs), in addition to standard pelvic MRI and CT staging. Methods: All patients with locally advanced rectal cancer that had TDs on their baseline [...] Read more.
Rationale: F18-FDG PET/CT may be helpful in baseline staging of patients with high-risk LARC presenting with vascular tumor deposits (TDs), in addition to standard pelvic MRI and CT staging. Methods: All patients with locally advanced rectal cancer that had TDs on their baseline MRI of the pelvis and had a baseline F18-FDG PET/CT between May 2016 and December 2020 were included in this retrospective study. TDs as well as lymph nodes identified on pelvic MRI were correlated to the corresponding nodular structures on a standard F18-FDG PET/CT, including measurements of nodular SUVmax and SUVmean. In addition, the effects of partial volume and spill-in on SUV measurements were studied. Results: A total number of 62 patients were included, in which 198 TDs were identified as well as 106 lymph nodes (both normal and metastatic). After ruling out partial volume effects and spill-in, 23 nodular structures remained that allowed for reliable measurement of SUVmax: 19 TDs and 4 LNs. The median SUVmax between TDs and LNs was not significantly different (p = 0.096): 4.6 (range 0.8 to 11.3) versus 2.8 (range 1.9 to 3.9). For the median SUVmean, there was a trend towards a significant difference (p = 0.08): 3.9 (range 0.7 to 7.8) versus 2.3 (range 1.5 to 3.4). Most nodular structures showing either an SUVmax or SUVmean ≥ 4 were characterized as TDs on MRI, while only two were characterized as LNs. Conclusions: SUV measurements may help in separating TDs from lymph node metastases or normal lymph nodes in patients with high-risk LARC. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functional and Molecular Imaging of the Abdomen)
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11 pages, 4942 KiB  
Article
Systematic Evaluation of Imaging Features of Early Bladder Cancer Using Computed Tomography Performed before Pathologic Diagnosis
by Rubab F. Malik, Renu Berry, Brandyn D. Lau, Kiran R. Busireddy, Prasan Patel, Sunil H. Patel, Elliot K. Fishman, Trinity J. Bivalacqua, Pamela T. Johnson and Farzad Sedaghat
Tomography 2023, 9(5), 1734-1744; https://doi.org/10.3390/tomography9050138 - 11 Sep 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1329
Abstract
Background: Bladder cancer is the sixth most common malignancy in the United States (US). Despite its high prevalence and the significant potential benefits of early detection, no reliable, cost-effective screening algorithm exists for asymptomatic patients at risk. Nonetheless, reports of incidentally identified early [...] Read more.
Background: Bladder cancer is the sixth most common malignancy in the United States (US). Despite its high prevalence and the significant potential benefits of early detection, no reliable, cost-effective screening algorithm exists for asymptomatic patients at risk. Nonetheless, reports of incidentally identified early bladder cancer on CT/MRI scans performed for other indications are emerging in the literature. This represents a new opportunity for early detection, with over 80 million CT scans performed in the US yearly, 40% of which are abdominopelvic CTs. This investigation aims to define the imaging features of early bladder cancer, with the mission of facilitating early diagnosis. Methods: Following IRB approval with a waiver of informed consent, a retrospective review was performed, identifying 624 patients with non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer diagnosed at Johns Hopkins Hospital between 2000 and 2019. Of these patients, 99 patients underwent pelvic CT within the 5 years preceding pathologic diagnosis. These imaging studies were reviewed retrospectively to evaluate for the presence and features of any focal bladder wall abnormality. Results: Median age at the time of pathologic diagnosis was 70 years (range: 51–88 years), and 82% (81/99) of patients were male. A total of 226 CT studies were reviewed. The number of studies per patient ranged from 1 to 33. Median time interval between all available imaging and pathologic diagnosis was 14 months. A total of 62% (141/226) of the scans reviewed were performed for indications other than suspected urinary tract cancer (UTC). A bladder wall mass was visualized in 67% (66/99) of patients and on 35% (78/226) of scans performed before diagnosis. The majority (84%, 67/80) of masses were intraluminal. Mean transverse long- and short-axis measurements were 24 mm and 17 mm, respectively, with long dimension measurements ranging between 5 and 59 mm. Conclusions: Early bladder cancer was visualized on CT preceding pathologic diagnosis in more than 2/3 of patients, and the majority of scans were performed for indications other than suspected urinary tract cancer/UTC symptoms. These results suggest that cross-sectional imaging performed for other indications can serve as a resource for opportunistic bladder cancer screening, particularly in high-risk patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functional and Molecular Imaging of the Abdomen)
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