Modern Statistical and Machine Learning Techniques for Financial Data

A special issue of Risks (ISSN 2227-9091).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2024 | Viewed by 1922

Special Issue Editor


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Statistics and Actuarial Science, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL 60115, USA
Interests: dependence modeling; copula; quantitative finance; quantitative risk management

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Modern statistical and machine learning methods have provided powerful tools with which to tackle large amounts of financial data, either for financial risk management or for investment and trading strategies.

The Special Issue aims to collect research work on innovative applications of modern statistical and machine learning methods related to financial data, including, but not limited to, the following topics:

  1. Explanatory/interpretable machine learning methods for financial data.
  2. Tail risks, tail dependence, and extreme value modeling for financial data.
  3. Systemic risk, liquidity risk, anomaly detection, and financial stability.
  4. Behavioral finance, sentiment analysis, and news as well as social network analysis.
  5. Market microstructure analysis and high-frequency trading strategies.

Prof. Dr. Lei (Larry) Hua
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Risks is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • high-frequency financial data
  • limit order book data
  • alternative data
  • explanatory machine learning/deep learning
  • multivariate non-Gaussian and extreme values
  • copula and dependence modeling
  • financial time series
  • volatility modeling
  • statistical arbitrage
  • futures, stocks, ETFs, forex, and cryptos

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

16 pages, 668 KiB  
Article
A Hybrid Model for Forecasting Realized Volatility Based on Heterogeneous Autoregressive Model and Support Vector Regression
by Yue Zhuo and Takayuki Morimoto
Risks 2024, 12(1), 12; https://doi.org/10.3390/risks12010012 - 16 Jan 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1711
Abstract
In this study, we proposed two types of hybrid models based on the heterogeneous autoregressive (HAR) model and support vector regression (SVR) model to forecast realized volatility (RV). The first model is a residual-type model, where the RV is first predicted using the [...] Read more.
In this study, we proposed two types of hybrid models based on the heterogeneous autoregressive (HAR) model and support vector regression (SVR) model to forecast realized volatility (RV). The first model is a residual-type model, where the RV is first predicted using the HAR model, and the residuals are used to train the SVR model. The residual component is then predicted using the SVR model, and the results from both the HAR and SVR models are combined to obtain the final prediction. The second model is a weight-based model, which is a combination of the HAR and SVR models and uses the same independent variables and dependent variables as the HAR model; we adjust the contribution of the two models to the predicted values by giving different weights to each model. In particular, four volatility models are used in RV forecasting as basic models. For empirical analysis, the RV of returns of the Tokyo stock price index and five individual stocks of TOPIX 30 is used as the dataset. The empirical results reveal that according to the model confidence set test, the weight-type model outperforms the HAR model and the residual-type HAR–SVR model. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Modern Statistical and Machine Learning Techniques for Financial Data)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop