Reclaiming Voices: Women's Contributions to Baptist History

A special issue of Religions (ISSN 2077-1444).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2024 | Viewed by 1501

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Associate Professor of Christian History, Acadia Divinity College, Wolfville, NS, Canada
Interests: women in mission; women’s ordination; Southern Baptist women; Canadian Baptist women

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Women make up more than half of Baptist church members globally, yet many histories of Baptists have neglected women, focusing instead on men and the institutions they lead. This Special Issue of Religions seeks to fill this lacuna. It will amplify women’s voices in the Baptist story, from the early seventeenth century to the early twenty-first century. By highlighting women’s contributions, the Special Issue will provide a fuller understanding of Baptist history as it actually happened.

We are pleased to invite you to contribute to this Special Issue. Original research articles and reviews are welcome. Contributions are welcome from scholars at all stages of their careers. 

Research areas may include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • Baptist women pursuing ministry
  • Baptist women and missions
  • Baptist women in the Majority World
  • Baptist women’s writings
  • Biographies of Baptist women

We request that, prior to submitting a manuscript, interested authors initially submit a proposed title and an abstract of 150–200 words summarizing their intended contribution. Please send it to the Guest Editor, Dr. Maxwell (melody.maxwell@acadiau.ca), and CC the Assistant Editor, Ms. Violet Li (violet.li@mdpi.com). Abstracts will be reviewed by the Guest Editor for the purposes of ensuring proper fit within the scope of the Special Issue. Full manuscripts will undergo double-blind peer review.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Dr. Melody Maxwell
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Religions is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Baptist
  • woman
  • gender
  • church
  • Christianity
  • Protestant
  • history

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

13 pages, 266 KiB  
Article
“She Is the Seminary”: The Life and Ministry of Dr. Olive L. Clark (1894–1989), Canadian Fundamentalist Educator
by Taylor Murray
Religions 2024, 15(4), 490; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel15040490 - 16 Apr 2024
Viewed by 666
Abstract
This article explores the life and contributions of Dr. Olive L. Clark (1894–1989), a long-time faculty member at the fundamentalist Toronto Baptist Seminary (TBS). In the 1920s, Clark sided with the fundamentalists and became a vocal critic of the Baptist Convention of Ontario [...] Read more.
This article explores the life and contributions of Dr. Olive L. Clark (1894–1989), a long-time faculty member at the fundamentalist Toronto Baptist Seminary (TBS). In the 1920s, Clark sided with the fundamentalists and became a vocal critic of the Baptist Convention of Ontario and Quebec. As the first person to receive a PhD in Classics from the University of Toronto, she was a gifted scholar. In 1928, she became one of the first faculty members at the newly-minted Toronto Baptist Seminary—operated by the prominent fundamentalist leader T. T. Shields—and remained there until her retirement thirty-eight years later. Through those years and even into retirement, she took an active role in the fundamentalist community by training pastors, publishing lesson plans and articles, speaking in various churches, and serving as co-editor of The Gospel Witness newspaper. In the process, she helped guide and shape the movement, both behind the scenes and in visible ways. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Reclaiming Voices: Women's Contributions to Baptist History)
13 pages, 223 KiB  
Article
General Baptist Women in Orissa, India: Initiatives in Female Education, 1860s–1880s
by Ian Randall
Religions 2024, 15(4), 450; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel15040450 - 2 Apr 2024
Viewed by 522
Abstract
This article looks at the General Baptist mission in Orissa, India, from the 1860s to the 1880s, with particular reference to the way women who served within the mission fulfilled a role in teaching and encouraging girls and women, especially by setting up [...] Read more.
This article looks at the General Baptist mission in Orissa, India, from the 1860s to the 1880s, with particular reference to the way women who served within the mission fulfilled a role in teaching and encouraging girls and women, especially by setting up schooling. The challenges of a time of desperate famine, with many orphans being cared for, are examined. The General Baptist mission worked with other bodies, notably and crucially with the interdenominational Female Education Society. A major aim was that, through the work of the female teachers, local teachers would be equipped. The argument here is that there was integrity in what was performed, and thus, this article offers an alternative to interpretations that dismiss the validity of the mission endeavours. The Orissa mission continued on beyond the 1880s, with wider fellowship eventually happening through the Church of North India. This study does not go beyond the 1880s as that would introduce a new phase with the amalgamation in 1891 of the General and Particular Baptists and their overseas missionary societies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Reclaiming Voices: Women's Contributions to Baptist History)
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