Smart Nanotechnology to Enhancing Drug Delivery and Bioavailability

A special issue of Pharmaceutics (ISSN 1999-4923). This special issue belongs to the section "Nanomedicine and Nanotechnology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2024) | Viewed by 1354

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Laboratory of Nanostructured Formulations, Department of Pharmacy, Universidade Estadual do Centro-Oeste, Guarapuava 85040-167, Brazil
Interests: nanotechnology in drug delivery; bioavailability enhancement; nanostructured drug formulations; pharmacokinetics of nanoparticles; nanomedicine

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the dynamic landscape of pharmaceuticals, enhancing drug bioavailability remains a pivotal challenge, often addressed through innovative nanotechnology applications. This Special Issue delves into the cutting-edge strategies utilizing diverse nanostructures to revolutionize drug delivery systems. We are particularly interested in submissions that demonstrate how these nanostructures facilitate targeted delivery, improve pharmacokinetic profiles and overcome biological barriers, thereby enhancing the therapeutic effectiveness and safety profiles of drugs. The issue aims to highlight advancements in nanocarrier design that optimize the release and absorption of active pharmaceutical ingredients, addressing the critical aspects of solubility, stability and controlled release in drug delivery.

We encourage contributions that showcase novel methodologies and practical aspects of smart nanotechnology in enhancing drug delivery systems and improving bioavailability. Submissions may include, but are not limited to, studies on formulation strategies, in vivo and in vitro evaluations, and the impact of nanotechnology on the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of drugs. We welcome research that bridges the gap between nanotechnology and practical pharmaceutical applications, offering insights into the future of drug delivery and bioavailability enhancement. We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Dr. Rubiana Mara Mainardes
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nanotechnology
  • drug bioavailability
  • nanostructures
  • targeted drug delivery
  • pharmacokinetics
  • pharmacodynamics

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

16 pages, 2242 KiB  
Article
Oral Delivery of Liraglutide-Loaded Zein/Eudragit-Chitosan Nanoparticles Provides Pharmacokinetic and Glycemic Outcomes Comparable to Its Subcutaneous Injection in Rats
by Jeferson Ziebarth, Letícia Marina da Silva, Ariane Krause Padilha Lorenzett, Ingrid Delbone Figueiredo, Paulo Fernando Carlstrom, Felipe Nunes Cardoso, André Luiz Ferreira de Freitas, Amanda Martins Baviera and Rubiana Mara Mainardes
Pharmaceutics 2024, 16(5), 634; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics16050634 - 9 May 2024
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Abstract
Liraglutide (LIRA) is a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist renowned for its efficacy in treating type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and is typically administered via subcutaneous injections. Oral delivery, although more desirable for being painless and potentially enhancing patient adherence, is challenged by [...] Read more.
Liraglutide (LIRA) is a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist renowned for its efficacy in treating type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and is typically administered via subcutaneous injections. Oral delivery, although more desirable for being painless and potentially enhancing patient adherence, is challenged by the peptide’s low bioavailability and vulnerability to digestive enzymes. This study aimed to develop LIRA-containing zein-based nanoparticles stabilized with eudragit RS100 and chitosan for oral use (Z-ERS-CS/LIRA). These nanoparticles demonstrated a spherical shape, with a mean diameter of 238.6 nm, a polydispersity index of 0.099, a zeta potential of +40.9 mV, and an encapsulation efficiency of 41%. In vitro release studies indicated a prolonged release, with up to 61% of LIRA released over 24 h. Notably, the nanoparticles showed considerable resistance and stability in simulated gastric and intestinal fluids, suggesting protection from pH and enzymatic degradation. Pharmacokinetic analysis revealed that orally administered Z-ERS-CS/LIRA paralleled the pharmacokinetic profile seen with subcutaneously delivered LIRA. Furthermore, in vivo tests on a diabetic rat model showed that Z-ERS-CS/LIRA significantly controlled glucose levels, comparable to the results observed with free LIRA. The findings underscore Z-ERS-CS/LIRA nanoparticles as a promising approach for oral LIRA delivery in T2DM management. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Smart Nanotechnology to Enhancing Drug Delivery and Bioavailability)
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23 pages, 13914 KiB  
Article
Shape Matters: Impact of Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticle Morphology on Anti-Tumor Efficacy
by Weixiang Fang, Kailing Yu, Songhan Zhang, Lai Jiang, Hongyue Zheng, Qiaoling Huang and Fanzhu Li
Pharmaceutics 2024, 16(5), 632; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics16050632 - 8 May 2024
Viewed by 509
Abstract
A nanoparticle’s shape is a critical determinant of its biological interactions and therapeutic effectiveness. This study investigates the influence of shape on the performance of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) in anticancer therapy. MSNs with spherical, rod-like, and hexagonal-plate-like shapes were synthesized, with particle [...] Read more.
A nanoparticle’s shape is a critical determinant of its biological interactions and therapeutic effectiveness. This study investigates the influence of shape on the performance of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) in anticancer therapy. MSNs with spherical, rod-like, and hexagonal-plate-like shapes were synthesized, with particle sizes of around 240 nm, and their other surface properties were characterized. The drug loading capacities of the three shapes were controlled to be 47.46%, 49.41%, and 46.65%, respectively. The effects of shape on the release behaviors, cellular uptake mechanisms, and pharmacological behaviors of MSNs were systematically investigated. Through a series of in vitro studies using 4T1 cells and in vivo evaluations in 4T1 tumor-bearing mice, the release kinetics, cellular behaviors, pharmacological effects, circulation profiles, and therapeutic efficacy of MSNs were comprehensively assessed. Notably, hexagonal-plate-shaped MSNs loaded with PTX exhibited a prolonged circulation time (t1/2 = 13.59 ± 0.96 h), which was approximately 1.3 times that of spherical MSNs (t1/2 = 10.16 ± 0.38 h) and 1.5 times that of rod-shaped MSNs (t1/2 = 8.76 ± 1.37 h). This research underscores the significance of nanoparticles’ shapes in dictating their biological interactions and therapeutic outcomes, providing valuable insights for the rational design of targeted drug delivery systems in cancer therapy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Smart Nanotechnology to Enhancing Drug Delivery and Bioavailability)
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