Enzyme-Based Drug Delivery Systems

A special issue of Pharmaceuticals (ISSN 1424-8247). This special issue belongs to the section "Pharmaceutical Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2022) | Viewed by 10775

Special Issue Editors

Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China
Interests: nanozyme; ferritin; drug delivery; tumor theranostics; cardiovascular disease
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
School of Biomedical Engineering, Research and Engineering Center of Biomedical Materials, Anhui Provincial Institute of Translational Medicine, Anhui Medical University, Hefei 230032, China
Interests: nanozyme; cancer theranostics; sonodynamic therapy; antibacterial treatment
Department of Urology, Guangzhou Institute of Urology, Guangdong Key Laboratory of Urology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou 510230, China
Interests: nanozyme; theranostics; urinary tumor; selenium nanoparticles; sonodynamic therapy
The Sixth People's Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China
Interests: prussian blue; nanomedicine; nanozyme; bioactive materials; molecular imaging

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Enzyme-based drug delivery systems usually refer to a specific drug delivery strategy, which can be catalytically activated at the lesion to achieve more efficient on-demand drug delivery. With the rapid development of precise drug delivery systems contributed by doctors, pharmacists, and scientists from biology, physics, chemistry, material, electrical engineering, mechanical engineering, etc., many efforts have been made in the design and construction, therapeutic efficacy, and detailed therapeutic mechanism of this promising field to promote the clinical translation of enzyme-based drug delivery systems.

In the Special Issue, the articles, reviews, and perspectives are included but are not limited to the following two topics:

  1. Artificial-enzyme-based (including but not limited to nanozyme) drug delivery systems;
  2. Natural-enzyme-based drug delivery systems.

Prof. Dr. Kelong Fan
Prof. Dr. Xianwen Wang
Prof. Dr. Hong-Xing Liu
Prof. Dr. Xiaojun Cai
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Pharmaceuticals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • drug delivery
  • nanozyme
  • natural enzyme
  • theranostics
  • nanomedicine

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

9 pages, 7576 KiB  
Article
Albumin-Based Zn (II)-Quercetin Enzyme Mimic Scavenging ROS for Protection against Cardiotoxicity Induced by Doxorubicin
Pharmaceuticals 2022, 15(12), 1524; https://doi.org/10.3390/ph15121524 - 08 Dec 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1054
Abstract
Doxorubicin (DOX) is a chemotherapeutic agent that can cause cardiotoxicity leading to progressive, chronic, life-threatening cardiomyopathy, called DOX-induced cardiomyopathy (DIC). DIC is a fatal cardiomyopathy with a worse prognosis compared to other cardiomyopathies and limits the use of DOX in malignancies due to [...] Read more.
Doxorubicin (DOX) is a chemotherapeutic agent that can cause cardiotoxicity leading to progressive, chronic, life-threatening cardiomyopathy, called DOX-induced cardiomyopathy (DIC). DIC is a fatal cardiomyopathy with a worse prognosis compared to other cardiomyopathies and limits the use of DOX in malignancies due to its cardiotoxicity. DIC has been proven to be associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced side effect damage in cardiac myocytes. Currently, scavenging of reactive oxygen species is a practical strategy to reduce chemotherapy-associated DIC. Although quercetin has already been reported to have superior antioxidant activity, its clinical application is severely limited due to its rapid degradation and poor tissue absorption. Herein, we reported the preparation of a novel enzyme mimic via coordinated albumin, Zinc Ion (Zn2+) and quercetin. The enzyme mimics were capable of simultaneously increasing the biocompatibility and efficiently overcame the drawbacks of free quercetin, and were achieved by long circulation in vivo. Most importantly, these quercetin-based enzyme mimics had no effect on the antioxidant activity of quercetin. These beneficial therapeutic properties, together with high drug-carrying capacity and redox stimuli, will significantly improve quercetin’s alleviation of chemotherapeutic cardiotoxicity without causing significant side effects. Therefore, nanoparticles of albumin-based Zn (II)-Quercetin have a promising clinical application as an effective agent for mitigating the cardiotoxicity of chemotherapy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Enzyme-Based Drug Delivery Systems)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

12 pages, 2580 KiB  
Article
Enzyme-Enhanced Codelivery of Doxorubicin and Bcl-2 Inhibitor by Electrospun Nanofibers for Synergistic Inhibition of Prostate Cancer Recurrence
Pharmaceuticals 2022, 15(10), 1244; https://doi.org/10.3390/ph15101244 - 10 Oct 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1615
Abstract
One of the great challenges of postoperative prostate cancer management is tumor recurrence. Although postoperative chemotherapy presents benefits to inhibit unexpected recurrence, it is still limited due to the drug resistance or intolerable complications of some patients. Electrospun nanofiber, as a promising drug [...] Read more.
One of the great challenges of postoperative prostate cancer management is tumor recurrence. Although postoperative chemotherapy presents benefits to inhibit unexpected recurrence, it is still limited due to the drug resistance or intolerable complications of some patients. Electrospun nanofiber, as a promising drug carrier, demonstrating sustained drug release behavior, can be implanted into the tumor resection site during surgery and is conductive to tumor inhibition. Herein, we fabricated electrospun nanofibers loaded with doxorubicin (DOX) and ABT199 to synergistically prevent postoperative tumor recurrence. Enzymatic degradation of the biodegradable electrospun nanofibers facilitated the release of the two drugs. The primarily released DOX from the electrospun nanofibers effectively inhibited tumor recurrence. However, the sustained release of DOX led to drug resistance of the tumor cells, yielding unsatisfactory eradication of the residual tumor. Remarkably, the combined administration of DOX and ABT199, simultaneously released from the nanofibers, not only prolonged the chemotherapy by DOX but also overcame the drug resistance via inhibiting the Bcl-2 activation and thereby enhancing the apoptosis of tumor cells by ABT199. This dual-drug-loaded implant system, combining efficient chemotherapy and anti-drug resistance, offers a prospective strategy for the potent inhibition of postoperative tumor recurrence. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Enzyme-Based Drug Delivery Systems)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

28 pages, 8473 KiB  
Review
Smart Biomimetic Nanozymes for Precise Molecular Imaging: Application and Challenges
Pharmaceuticals 2023, 16(2), 249; https://doi.org/10.3390/ph16020249 - 07 Feb 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1973
Abstract
New nanotechnologies for imaging molecules are widely being applied to visualize the expression of specific molecules (e.g., ions, biomarkers) for disease diagnosis. Among various nanoplatforms, nanozymes, which exhibit enzyme-like catalytic activities in vivo, have gained tremendously increasing attention in molecular imaging due to [...] Read more.
New nanotechnologies for imaging molecules are widely being applied to visualize the expression of specific molecules (e.g., ions, biomarkers) for disease diagnosis. Among various nanoplatforms, nanozymes, which exhibit enzyme-like catalytic activities in vivo, have gained tremendously increasing attention in molecular imaging due to their unique properties such as diverse enzyme-mimicking activities, excellent biocompatibility, ease of surface tenability, and low cost. In addition, by integrating different nanoparticles with superparamagnetic, photoacoustic, fluorescence, and photothermal properties, the nanoenzymes are able to increase the imaging sensitivity and accuracy for better understanding the complexity and the biological process of disease. Moreover, these functions encourage the utilization of nanozymes as therapeutic agents to assist in treatment. In this review, we focus on the applications of nanozymes in molecular imaging and discuss the use of peroxidase (POD), oxidase (OXD), catalase (CAT), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) with different imaging modalities. Further, the applications of nanozymes for cancer treatment, bacterial infection, and inflammation image-guided therapy are discussed. Overall, this review aims to provide a complete reference for research in the interdisciplinary fields of nanotechnology and molecular imaging to promote the advancement and clinical translation of novel biomimetic nanozymes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Enzyme-Based Drug Delivery Systems)
Show Figures

Figure 1

23 pages, 7560 KiB  
Review
Synthesis of Prussian Blue Nanoparticles and Their Antibacterial, Antiinflammation and Antitumor Applications
Pharmaceuticals 2022, 15(7), 769; https://doi.org/10.3390/ph15070769 - 21 Jun 2022
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 4197
Abstract
In recent years, Prussian blue nanoparticles (PBNPs), also named Prussian blue nano-enzymes, have been shown to demonstrate excellent multi-enzyme simulation activity and anti-inflammatory properties, and can be used as reactive oxygen scavengers. Their good biocompatibility and biodegradability mean that they are ideal candidates [...] Read more.
In recent years, Prussian blue nanoparticles (PBNPs), also named Prussian blue nano-enzymes, have been shown to demonstrate excellent multi-enzyme simulation activity and anti-inflammatory properties, and can be used as reactive oxygen scavengers. Their good biocompatibility and biodegradability mean that they are ideal candidates for in vivo use. PBNPs are highly efficient electron transporters with oxidation and reduction activities. PBNPs also show considerable promise as nano-drug carriers and biological detection sensors owing to their huge specific surface area, good chemical characteristics, and changeable qualities, which might considerably increase the therapeutic impact. More crucially, PBNPs, as therapeutic and diagnostic agents, have made significant advances in biological nanomedicine. This review begins with a brief description of the synthesis methods of PBNPs, then focuses on the applications of PBNPs in tissue regeneration and inflammation according to the different properties of PBNPs. This article will provide a timely reference for further study of PBNPs as therapeutic agents. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Enzyme-Based Drug Delivery Systems)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop