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Fluorine in Imaging toward Biological and Medical Applications

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Medicinal Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2023) | Viewed by 8915

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Laboratoire de Chimie de Coordionation, CNRS UPR 8241, Université de Toulouse, 205 Route de Narbonne, 31077 Toulouse, CEDEX 4, France
Interests: organic synthesis; fluorination and radiofluorination; method development; molecular probe synthesis; multimodal approaches

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Guest Editor
Director of PET Radiochemistry, IDP Faculty in Medicinal Chemistry, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA
Interests: positron emission tomography; PET imaging; radiochemistry; fluorine chemistry; molecular imaging

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Obtaining a detailed understanding of the living represents a continual and potentially everlasting research effort that reflects mankind’s unwavering pursuit for improvements in the quality of life. This pursuit requires numerous investigations based on an array of tools among which imaging, in its different modalities, is providing clear views of biological processes in their environment, from the cellular level to the whole body. Molecular imaging is especially well-suited for these investigations and fluorine appears as a key element for its different modalities. Indeed, its peculiar chemical properties, nuclear spin, and availability of corresponding radioactive isotopes enable its use in a range of imaging techniques of interest, such as MRI and PET. It is also commonly found in fluorescent probes. Thus, by taking advantage of all its physical chemistry properties one can envisage its efficient involvement in multimodal imaging. This Special Issue aims to gather manuscripts illustrating the state of the art in the use of fluorine in imaging with applications in biology and medicine, including authoritative reviews from leaders in these fields, as well as original research articles and communications.

Dr. Emmanuel Gras
Dr. Peter J. H. Scott
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • positron emission tomography
  • magnetic resonance imaging
  • fluorescence imaging
  • theranostics
  • multimodal imaging
  • radiofluorination
  • biologically active fluorinated probes

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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20 pages, 3938 KiB  
Article
Fluorinated Human Serum Albumin as Potential 19F Magnetic Resonance Imaging Probe
by Dmitry E. Mitin and Alexey S. Chubarov
Molecules 2023, 28(4), 1695; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules28041695 - 10 Feb 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1546
Abstract
Fluorinated human serum albumin conjugates were prepared and tested as potential metal-free probes for 19F magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Each protein molecule was modified by several fluorine-containing compounds via the N-substituted natural acylating reagent homocysteine thiolactone. Albumin conjugates retain the protein’s physical [...] Read more.
Fluorinated human serum albumin conjugates were prepared and tested as potential metal-free probes for 19F magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Each protein molecule was modified by several fluorine-containing compounds via the N-substituted natural acylating reagent homocysteine thiolactone. Albumin conjugates retain the protein’s physical and biological properties, such as its 3D dimensional structure, aggregation ability, good solubility, proteolysis efficiency, biocompatibility, and low cytotoxicity. A dual-labeled with cyanine 7 fluorescence dye and fluorine reporter group albumin were synthesized for simultaneous fluorescence imaging and 19F MRI. The preliminary in vitro studies show the prospects of albumin carriers for multimodal imaging. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fluorine in Imaging toward Biological and Medical Applications)
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11 pages, 1208 KiB  
Article
Optimization of Direct Aromatic 18F-Labeling of Tetrazines
by Ida Vang Andersen, Rocío García-Vázquez, Umberto Maria Battisti and Matthias M. Herth
Molecules 2022, 27(13), 4022; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules27134022 - 22 Jun 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1708
Abstract
Radiolabeling of tetrazines has gained increasing attention due to their important role in pretargeted imaging or therapy. The most commonly used radionuclide in PET imaging is fluorine-18. For this reason, we have recently developed a method which enables the direct aromatic 18F-fluorination [...] Read more.
Radiolabeling of tetrazines has gained increasing attention due to their important role in pretargeted imaging or therapy. The most commonly used radionuclide in PET imaging is fluorine-18. For this reason, we have recently developed a method which enables the direct aromatic 18F-fluorination of tetrazines using stannane precursors through copper-mediated fluorinations. Herein, we further optimized this labeling procedure. 3-(3-fluorophenyl)-1,2,4,5-tetrazine was chosen for this purpose because of its high reactivity and respective limited stability during the labeling process. By optimizing parameters such as elution conditions, precursor amount, catalyst, time or temperature, the radiochemical yield (RCY) could be increased by approximately 30%. These conditions were then applied to optimize the RCY of a recently successfully developed and promising pretargeting imaging agent. This agent could be isolated in a decay corrected RCY of 14 ± 3% and Am of 201 ± 30 GBq/µmol in a synthesis time of 70 min. Consequently, the RCY increased by 27%. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fluorine in Imaging toward Biological and Medical Applications)
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Review

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24 pages, 2869 KiB  
Review
Fluorine-18-Labeled Fluorescent Dyes for Dual-Mode Molecular Imaging
by Maxime Munch, Benjamin H. Rotstein and Gilles Ulrich
Molecules 2020, 25(24), 6042; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25246042 - 21 Dec 2020
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 4117
Abstract
Recent progress realized in the development of optical imaging (OPI) probes and devices has made this technique more and more affordable for imaging studies and fluorescence-guided surgery procedures. However, this imaging modality still suffers from a low depth of penetration, thus limiting its [...] Read more.
Recent progress realized in the development of optical imaging (OPI) probes and devices has made this technique more and more affordable for imaging studies and fluorescence-guided surgery procedures. However, this imaging modality still suffers from a low depth of penetration, thus limiting its use to shallow tissues or endoscopy-based procedures. In contrast, positron emission tomography (PET) presents a high depth of penetration and the resulting signal is less attenuated, allowing for imaging in-depth tissues. Thus, association of these imaging techniques has the potential to push back the limits of each single modality. Recently, several research groups have been involved in the development of radiolabeled fluorophores with the aim of affording dual-mode PET/OPI probes used in preclinical imaging studies of diverse pathological conditions such as cancer, Alzheimer’s disease, or cardiovascular diseases. Among all the available PET-active radionuclides, 18F stands out as the most widely used for clinical imaging thanks to its advantageous characteristics (t1/2 = 109.77 min; 97% β+ emitter). This review focuses on the recent efforts in the synthesis and radiofluorination of fluorescent scaffolds such as 4,4-difluoro-4-bora-diazaindacenes (BODIPYs), cyanines, and xanthene derivatives and their use in preclinical imaging studies using both PET and OPI technologies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fluorine in Imaging toward Biological and Medical Applications)
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