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Cannabigerolic Acid (CBGA) from Processing to Application in Food and Life-Changing Therapeutic Medicine

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Medicinal Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2022) | Viewed by 2546

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
School of Science, RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC 3083, Australia
Interests: food chemistry; processing technologies; encapsulation; plant proteins; bioactives
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Science, RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC 3083, Australia
Interests: biochemistry; natural plant extract; formula development; synergic effect; medicinal herbs; antibiotics; post-harvest technology and food safety

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Recently, there has been increased interest in Cannabis sativa containing hundreds of cannabinoids such as cannabigerol (CBG), cannabidiol (CBD), tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), and noncannabinoid (phenols, flavonoids, terpenes, and alkaloids) compounds to be used in cosmetics, food, and the pharmaceutical industry. Cannabinoids and terpenoids are produced and stored in the secretory cells of glandular trichomes.

Two precursors for cannabinoids are olivetolic acid and geranyl diphosphate. However, terpenoids are derived from the mevalonate or methyl-erythritol phosphate pathway. Cannabinoids appear to be of therapeutic value as antidepressive, antiepileptic, antispasticity, and anti-inflammatory, stroke, rheumatoid arthritis, and for various types of cancer. However, THC is well-documented to have anti-inflammatory effects, treating Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s, and diabetes. Cannabigerol (CBG) and cannabichromene (CBC) have antibacterial and antifungal effects and act as antidepressants. However, terpenes are the primary constituents of essential oils and are responsible for the aroma characteristics of cannabis. Many factors control the quality of the cannabinoids and volatile compounds, including climate conditions, propagation and cultivation practices, and postharvest processing, including drying and extraction. Cannabis is a source of scientific discoveries translated into practical applications in the food, pharmaceutical, and medicine fields.

This present Special Issue welcomes the submission of compelling scientific unpublished manuscripts (review and original research papers) concerning the properties of C. Sativa, with the potential for new in vitro and in vivo studies for novel life-changing medicinal cannabis. Additionally, the application of the instrumental analysis (volatile compounds) and sensory analysis as tools for quality control of foods as affected by optimized growing conditions, postharvest processing conditions, and food manufacture methods is essential for the success of food production.

Dr. Jayani Chandrapala
Dr. Hebah M.S. AL Ubeed
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • cannabinoids
  • volatile compositions
  • extraction and isolation active phytochemicals
  • novel drugs
  • sustainable diets
  • food processing and preservation
  • postharvest technology
  • in vitro experiment
  • in vivo experiment

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

16 pages, 3629 KiB  
Article
Natural Hemp-Ginger Extract and Its Biological and Therapeutic Efficacy
by Taja Žitek, Dragana Bjelić, Petra Kotnik, Andrej Golle, Staša Jurgec, Uroš Potočnik, Željko Knez, Matjaž Finšgar, Ivan Krajnc, Igor Krajnc and Maša Knez Marevci
Molecules 2022, 27(22), 7694; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules27227694 - 09 Nov 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1552
Abstract
The prevention and treatment of skin diseases remains a major challenge in medicine. The search for natural active ingredients that can be used to prevent the development of the disease and complement treatment is on the rise. Natural extracts of ginger and hemp [...] Read more.
The prevention and treatment of skin diseases remains a major challenge in medicine. The search for natural active ingredients that can be used to prevent the development of the disease and complement treatment is on the rise. Natural extracts of ginger and hemp offer a wide range of bioactive compounds with potential health benefits. This study evaluates the effectiveness of hemp and ginger extract as a supportive treatment for skin diseases. It reports a synergistic effect of hemp and ginger extract. The contents of cannabinoids and components of ginger are determined, with the highest being CBD (587.17 ± 8.32 µg/g) and 6-gingerol (60.07 ± 0.40 µg/g). The minimum inhibitory concentration for Staphylococcus aureus (156.5 µg/mL), Escherichia coli (625.2 µg/mL) and Candida albicans (78.3 µg/mL) was also analyzed. Analysis of WM-266-4 cells revealed the greatest decrease in metabolic activity in cells exposed to the extract at a concentration of 1.00 µg/mL. Regarding the expression of genes associated with cellular processes, melanoma aggressiveness, resistance and cell survival, a significant difference was found in the expression of ABCB5, CAV1 and S100A9 compared with the control (cells not exposed to the extract). Full article
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