Pathogenesis and Treatment of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

A special issue of Medical Sciences (ISSN 2076-3271). This special issue belongs to the section "Hepatic and Gastroenterology Diseases".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2024) | Viewed by 2144

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Laboratory of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Democritus University of Thrace, Dragana, 68100 Alexandroupolis, Greece
Interests: mucosal immunology; intestinal inflammation; gut fibrosis; microbiome; stem cell biology
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Co-Guest Editor
Laboratory of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Democritus University of Thrace, Dragana, 68100 Alexandroupolis, Greece
Interests: stem cells; bioengineering; biotechnology; regenerative medicine

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Co-Guest Editor
Laboratory of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Democritus University of Thrace, Dragana, 68100 Alexandroupolis, Greece
Interests: microbiota; mucosal immunology; inflammatory bowel disease; host-pathogen interactions; infectious diseases

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is the term used to describe ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease, both chronic inflammatory disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. Although much  research has been completed to partially elucidate the pathogenetic mechanisms of this disease by implicating various immunological, genetic, environmental, and microbial factors, its pathogenesis is not yet fully understood. Regarding treatment, current options include a variety of pharmacological agents such as aminosalicylates, corticosteroids, immunomodulators, Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitors, and recently, biologics; the latter has revolutionized the field of IBD pharmacotherapy by targeting specific molecular pathways. Nonetheless, it should be noted that some patients do not respond to current treatments, whereas others may lose the therapeutic benefit as the disease progresses. This Special Issue aims to highlight the latest findings on the pathogenetic mechanisms involved in IBD, along with potential new theapeutic targets that could serve as possible future treatments. 

Dr. Eirini Filidou
Dr. Leonidas Kandilogiannakis
Dr. Michail Spathakis
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • inflammatory bowel disease
  • Crohn’s disease
  • ulcerative colitis
  • pathogenesis
  • intestinal inflammation
  • fibrosis
  • microbiome
  • therapeutic treatment

Published Papers (1 paper)

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9 pages, 2570 KiB  
Case Report
Recurrent Multidrug-Resistant Clostridium difficile Infection Secondary to Ulcerative Colitis a Case Report
by Arturo P. Jaramillo, Javier Castells, Sabina Ibrahimli and Steven Siegel
Med. Sci. 2023, 11(3), 52; https://doi.org/10.3390/medsci11030052 - 16 Aug 2023
Viewed by 1691
Abstract
IBD consists of two diseases—CD and UC—that affect the digestive tract, with a greater affinity for the large bowel. In this case report, we focus on one of its most common complications. CDI is a pathology that is mostly secondary to UC. Another [...] Read more.
IBD consists of two diseases—CD and UC—that affect the digestive tract, with a greater affinity for the large bowel. In this case report, we focus on one of its most common complications. CDI is a pathology that is mostly secondary to UC. Another cause of this bacterial infection is established after the use of antibiotics, most commonly at the hospital level. Around 20 percent of CDI persists because of a chronic dysbiosis of the microbiota and low levels of antibodies against CD toxins. In this case report, we demonstrated mdCDI in a young woman after treatment with multiple drug therapies as well as with semi-invasive procedures as follows: antibiotics (vancomycin, fidaxomicin), anti-inflammatory agents (mesalamine, sulfasalazine), corticosteroids (budesonide, prednisone), integrin receptor antagonists (vedolizumab), several semi-invasive procedures such as fecal transplant microbiota (FMT), aminosalicylates (5-ASA), treatment with tumor necrosis factor (TNF) blockers (adalimumab, golimumab), and immunomodulators (upadcitinib, tofacitinib). This leads us to establish how rCDI and its resistance to different treatments make this a challenge for the health system, both for hospitals and for outpatients, as well as how time-consuming each treatment is from the first intake of the drug until its total efficacy or until patients reach a dose-response and time-response to the disease. Accordingly, this case report and other similar cases reflect the need for randomized control trials or meta-analyses to establish therapeutic guidelines for cases of mdCDI in the near future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pathogenesis and Treatment of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases)
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