Novel Materials in Li–Ion Batteries

A special issue of Inorganics (ISSN 2304-6740). This special issue belongs to the section "Inorganic Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2024 | Viewed by 4805

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Guest Editor
School of Materials Science and Engineering, Northeastern University, Shenyang, China
Interests: Li/Na–ion batteries; MOF materials; recycling; life cycle assessment
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Guest Editor
School of Materials Science and Engineering, Northeastern University, Shenyang, China
Interests: Li/Na–ion batteries; aqueous zinc–ion batteries; lithium–air batteries; potassium–ion batteries; supercapacitors

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Lithium–ion batteries (LIBs) play a pivotal role in modern energy storage and supply, making continuous innovation in this technology vital for driving the clean energy revolution. The performance of LIBs is closely tied to the characteristics of their positive and negative electrode materials, as well as the electrolyte. Therefore, significant advancements can be achieved by exploring novel materials for both electrodes, such as oxides, phosphates, and sulfides, and by optimizing electrolyte and separator materials to enhance battery capacity and safety.

Moreover, comprehensive research on the synthesis methods, interface design, and catalyst application of battery materials is crucial for achieving improvements in battery cycle life and energy density. This Special Issue will highlight the latest advances in novel materials for LIBs and provide examples of the outstanding contributions of many scientists and engineers in this emerging field.

The objective of this Special Issue is to act as a valuable resource and inspiration for the academic community, engineering professionals, and policymakers. We aim to collectively advance the development and application of lithium–ion battery technology. Papers on theory, experiments, design, simulation, etc., will be considered for publication, and we expect that many will contain aspects of all of these. 

Topic of interest include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Lithium–ion battery
  • Ionic conductors and electrolytes
  • Computational materials science
  • Finite element analysis
  • Computational fluid dynamics
  • Phase field simulation
  • Molecular dynamics
  • Machine learning
  • Advanced characterization technology
  • Multiscale simulation and optimization
  • Quantum computing
  • Artificial intelligence
  • Emerging battery technologies
  • Battery recycling
  • Environmentally friendly materials. 

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Dr. Pengwei Li
Prof. Dr. Shaohua Luo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Inorganics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Lithium–ion battery
  • new material
  • solid electrolyte
  • lithium-air battery
  • computational materials science
  • molecular dynamics
  • machine learning
  • multiscale simulation and optimization
  • artificial intelligence

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

14 pages, 6264 KiB  
Article
Facile Synthesis of Hollow V2O5 Microspheres for Lithium-Ion Batteries with Improved Performance
by Hailong Fei, Peng Wu, Liqing He and Haiwen Li
Inorganics 2024, 12(2), 37; https://doi.org/10.3390/inorganics12020037 - 24 Jan 2024
Viewed by 1320
Abstract
Micro-nanostructured electrode materials are characterized by excellent performance in various secondary batteries. In this study, a facile and green hydrothermal method was developed to prepare amorphous vanadium-based microspheres on a large scale. Hollow V2O5 microspheres were achieved, with controllable size, [...] Read more.
Micro-nanostructured electrode materials are characterized by excellent performance in various secondary batteries. In this study, a facile and green hydrothermal method was developed to prepare amorphous vanadium-based microspheres on a large scale. Hollow V2O5 microspheres were achieved, with controllable size, after the calcination of amorphous vanadium-based microspheres and were used as cathode materials for lithium-ion batteries. As the quantity of V2O5 microspheres increased, the electrode performance improved, which was ascribed to the smaller charge transfer impedance. The discharge capacity of hollow V2O5 microspheres could be up to 196.4 mAhg−1 at a current density of 50 mAg−1 between 2.0 and 3.5 V voltage limits. This sheds light on the synthesis and application of spherical electrode materials for energy storage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Materials in Li–Ion Batteries)
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12 pages, 9378 KiB  
Article
Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Matrix to Optimize Cycling Stability of Lithium Ion Battery Anode from SiOx Materials
by Xuan Bie, Yawei Dong, Man Xiong, Ben Wang, Zhongxue Chen, Qunchao Zhang, Yi Liu and Ronghua Huang
Inorganics 2024, 12(1), 9; https://doi.org/10.3390/inorganics12010009 - 25 Dec 2023
Viewed by 1472
Abstract
This study prepared silicon oxide anode materials with nitrogen-doped carbon matrices (SiOx/C–N) through silicon-containing polyester thermal carbonization. Melamine was introduced as a nitrogen source during the experiment. This nitrogen doping process resulted in a porous structure in the carbon matrices, a [...] Read more.
This study prepared silicon oxide anode materials with nitrogen-doped carbon matrices (SiOx/C–N) through silicon-containing polyester thermal carbonization. Melamine was introduced as a nitrogen source during the experiment. This nitrogen doping process resulted in a porous structure in the carbon matrices, a fact confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Pyridinic and quaternary nitrogen, but mainly tertiary nitrogen, were generated, as shown via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Electrochemical tests confirmed that, as anode materials for a lithium-ion battery, SiOx/C–N provided better cycle stability, improved rate capability, and lower Li+ diffusion resistance. The best performance showed an activated capacity at 493.5 mAh/g, preserved at 432.8 mAh/g after the 100th cycle, with 87.7% total Columbic efficiency. Those without nitrogen doping gave 1126.7 mAh/g, 249.0 mAh/g, and 22.1%, respectively. The most noteworthy point was that, after 100 cycles, anodes without nitrogen doping were pulverized into fine powders (SEM); meanwhile, in the case of anodes with nitrogen doping, powders of a larger size (0.5–1.0 µm) formed, with the accumulation of surrounding cavities. We suggest that the formation of more prominent powders may have resulted from the more substantial nitrogen-doped carbon matrices, which prevented the anode from further breaking down to a smaller size. The volume expansion stress decreased when the powders decreased to nanosize, which is why the nanosized silicon anode materials showed better cycling stability. When the anodes were cracked into powders with a determined diameter, the stress from volume expansion decreased to a level at which the powders could preserve their shape, and the breakage of the powders was stopped. Hence, the diameters of the final reserved powders are contingent on the strength of the matrix. As reported, nitrogen-doped carbon matrices are more robust than those not doped with nitrogen. Thus, in our research, anodes with nitrogen-doped carbon matrices presented more large-diameter powders, as SEM confirmed. Anodes with nitrogen doping will not be further broken at a larger diameter. At this point, the SEI film will not show continuous breakage and formation compared to the anode without doping. This was validated by the lower deposition content of the SEI-film-related elements (phosphorous and fluorine) in the cycled anodes with nitrogen doping. The anode without nitrogen doping presented higher content, meaning that the SEI films were broken many times during lithiation/delithiation (EDS mapping). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Materials in Li–Ion Batteries)
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12 pages, 6739 KiB  
Article
Effect of the Annealing Temperature of Lithiophilic Ag–Cu Co-Deposition on the Cycling Performance of Li-Metal Anodes
by Dae Hyun Kim, Seul Gi Kang, Bo Jung Kim, Heegyoun Lee, Jinmo Kim and Chang-Bun Yoon
Inorganics 2023, 11(11), 440; https://doi.org/10.3390/inorganics11110440 - 17 Nov 2023
Viewed by 1151
Abstract
Practical applications of Li-metal anodes are limited by dendrite formation, Li loss, and poor reaction, resulting in a low Coulombic efficiency. In this study, we investigated the effects of island-shaped Ag atoms on the electrochemical behavior of Li-metal anodes. A Ag–Cu film was [...] Read more.
Practical applications of Li-metal anodes are limited by dendrite formation, Li loss, and poor reaction, resulting in a low Coulombic efficiency. In this study, we investigated the effects of island-shaped Ag atoms on the electrochemical behavior of Li-metal anodes. A Ag–Cu film was co-deposited through sputtering and subsequent annealing to anchor the Ag atoms with an island shape on a Cu substrate. The Ag target was co-sputtered with Cu with controlled atomic ratios in the Ag–Cu alloy. The sputtering thickness was set to 100 nm, and various annealing conditions were applied. The embedded island-shaped Ag atoms provided effective nucleation sites for Li deposition during the electrochemical nucleation of Li, increasing the nucleation density and spatial uniformity while decreasing the nucleation size and potential. Compact dendrite-free high-density Li deposition was achieved by annealing the Ag–Cu current collector (CC) at 600 °C. Under repetitive Li plating and stripping for 110 cycles at a current density of 0.5 mAcm−2 and capacity of 1 mAhcm−2, a high Coulombic efficiency of 98.5% was achieved. Conversely, the bare Cu CC had a life of up to 67 cycles under the same test conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Materials in Li–Ion Batteries)
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